Slang meaning of TARTAN BANNER

TARTAN BANNER means: Tartan banner was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a sixpence (tanner).

What is the slang meaning/definition of TARTAN BANNER ?

TARTAN BANNER means: Tartan banner was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a sixpence (tanner).

Slang definition of TARTAN BANNER

TARTAN BANNER means: Tartan banner was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a sixpence (tanner).

More meanings / definitions of Tartan banner was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a sixpence (tanner). or words, sentences containing Tartan banner was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a sixpence (tanner).?

Tester (n.): An old French silver coin, originally of the value of about eighteen pence, subsequently reduced to ninepence, and later to sixpence, sterling. Hence, in modern English slang, a sixpence; -- often contracted to tizzy. Called also teston.

Cockney (n.): A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Mill-sixpence (n.): A milled sixpence; -- the sixpence being one of the first English coins milled (1561).

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Tartan (n.): Woolen cloth, checkered or crossbarred with narrow bands of various colors, much worn in the Highlands of Scotland; hence, any pattern of tartan; also, other material of a similar pattern.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Banner (n.): Any flag or standard; as, the star-spangled banner.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Ensign (n.): A flag; a banner; a standard; esp., the national flag, or a banner indicating nationality, carried by a ship or a body of soldiers; -- as distinguished from flags indicating divisions of the army, rank of naval officers, or private signals, and the like.

Flat-cap (n.): A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

Tanner (n.): One whose occupation is to tan hides, or convert them into leather by the use of tan.

Rhyming (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Rhyme

Plaided (a.): Of the material of which plaids are made; tartan.

Triplet (n.): Three verses rhyming together.

Cockneys (pl. ): of Cockney

Cokenay (n.): A cockney.

Cockney (a.): Of or relating to, or like, cockneys.

Bender (n.): A sixpence.

Sixpences (pl. ): of Sixpence

Quatrain (n.): A stanza of four lines rhyming alternately.

Testern (n.): A sixpence; a tester.

Teston (n.): A tester; a sixpence.

Rhymery (n.): The art or habit of making rhymes; rhyming; -- in contempt.

Cockneyfy (v. t.): To form with the manners or character of a cockney.

Cockney (n.): An effeminate person; a spoilt child.

Cockneyism (n.): The characteristics, manners, or dialect, of a cockney.

Chime (n.): To make a rude correspondence of sounds; to jingle, as in rhyming.

Bowbell (n.): One born within hearing distance of Bow-bells; a cockney.

Tartan (n.): A small coasting vessel, used in the Mediterranean, having one mast carrying large leteen sail, and a bowsprit with staysail or jib.

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Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Tartan banner was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a sixpence (tanner).

Meaning of TARTAN BANNER

TARTAN BANNER means: Tartan banner was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a sixpence (tanner).

Meaning of Tartan Banner

Tartan Banner means: Tanner (Sixpence)

Meaning of simon

simon means: sixpence (6d). The sixpenny piece used to be known long ago as a 'simon', possibly (ack L Bamford) through reference to the 17th century engraver at the Royal Mint, Thomas Simon. There has been speculation among etymologists that 'simon' meaning sixpence derives from an old play on words which represented biblical text that St Peter "...lodged with Simon a tanner.." as a description of a banking transaction, although Partridge's esteemed dictionary refutes this, at the same time conceding that the slang 'tanner' for sixpence might have developed or been reinforced by the old joke. See 'tanner' below.

Meaning of tanner

tanner means: sixpence (6d). The slang word 'tanner' meaning sixpence dates from the early 1800s and is derived most probably from Romany gypsy 'tawno' meaning small one, and Italian 'danaro' meaning small change. The 'tanner' slang was later reinforced (Ack L Bamford) via jocular reference to a biblical extract about St Peter lodging with Simon, a tanner (of hides). The biblical text (from Acts chapter 10 verse 6) is: "He (Peter) lodgeth with one Simon a tanner, whose house is by the sea side..", which was construed by jokers as banking transaction instead of a reference to overnight accommodation. Nick Ratnieks suggests the tanner was named after a Master of the Mint of that name. A further suggestion (ack S Kopec) refers to sixpence being connected with pricing in the leather trade. An obscure point of nostalgic trivia about the tanner is apparently (thanks J Veitch) a rhyme, from around the mid-1900s, sung to the tune of Rule Britannia: "Rule Brittania, two tanners make a bob, three make eighteen pence and four two bob…" My limited research suggests this rhyme was not from London.

Meaning of GODDESS DIANA

GODDESS DIANA means: Goddess Diana was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a sixpence (tanner).

Meaning of SUSIE ANNA

SUSIE ANNA means: Susie Anna was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a sixpence (tanner).

Meaning of SPRASI ANNA

SPRASI ANNA means: Sprasi Anna was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a sixpence (tanner).

Meaning of ENGINEER'S SPANNER

ENGINEER'S SPANNER means: Engineer's spanner was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a sixpence (tanner).

Meaning of ELSIE TANNER

ELSIE TANNER means: Elsie Tanner is London Cockney rhyming slang for a spanner.

Meaning of TANNER

TANNER means: Tanner was old British slang for a sixpence.

Meaning of kick

kick means: sixpence (6d), from the early 1700s, derived purely from the lose rhyming with six (not cockney rhyming slang), extending to and possible preceded and prompted by the slang expression 'two and a kick' meaning half a crown, i.e., two shillings and sixpence, commonly expressed as 'two and six', which is a more understandable association.

Meaning of IN AND OUT

IN AND OUT means: In and out is British slang for sexual intercourse.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for snout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for spout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for sprout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for stout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for tout.

Meaning of Lord Of The Manor

Lord Of The Manor means: Tanner (Sixpence)

Meaning of LORD OF THE MANOR

LORD OF THE MANOR means: Lord of the manor was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a six pence (tanner).

Meaning of joey

joey means: much debate about this: According to my information (1894 Brewer, and the modern Cassell's, Oxford, Morton, and various other sources) Joey was originally, from 1835 or 1836 a silver fourpenny piece called a groat (Brewer is firm about this), and this meaning subsequently transferred to the silver threepenny piece (Cassell's, Oxford, and Morton). I'm convinced these were the principal and most common usages of the Joey coin slang. Cassell's says Joey was also used for the brass-nickel threepenny bit, which was introduced in 1937, although as a child in South London the 1960s I cannot remember the threepenny bit ever being called a Joey, and neither can my Mum or Dad, who both say a Joey in London was a silver threepence and nothing else (although they'd be too young to remember groats...). I'm informed however (ack Stuart Taylor, Dec 2006) that Joey was indeed slang for the brass-nickel threepenny bit among children of the Worcester area in the period up to decimalisation in 1971, so as ever, slang is subject to regional variation. I personally feel (and think I recall) there was some transference of the Joey slang to the sixpence (tanner) some time after the silver threepenny coin changed to the brass threepenny bit (which was during the 1930-40s), and this would have been understandable because the silver sixpence was similar to the silver threepence, albeit slightly larger. There is also a view that Joey transferred from the threepenny bit to the sixpence when the latter became a more usual minimum fare in London taxi-cabs. So although the fourpenny groat and the silver threepenny coin arguably lay the major claim to the Joey title, usage also seems to have extended to later coins, notably the silver sixpence (tanner) and the brass-nickel threepenny bit. The Joey slang word seems reasonably certainly to have been named after the politician Joseph Hume (1777-1855), who advocated successfully that the fourpenny groat be reintroduced, which it was in 1835 or 1836, chiefly to foil London cab drivers (horse driven ones in those days) in their practice of pretending not to have change, with the intention of extorting a bigger tip, particularly when given two shillings for a two-mile fare, which at the time cost one shilling and eight-pence. The re-introduction of the groat thus enabled many customers to pay the exact fare, and so the cab drivers used the term Joey as a derisory reference for the fourpenny groats.

Meaning of BUBBLE AND SQUEAK

BUBBLE AND SQUEAK means: Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for beak (a magistrate). Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Greek.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for speak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for weak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a week.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for to urinate (leak).

Meaning of JACK AND JILL

JACK AND JILL means: Jack and Jill is British slang for a male and female police officer working as a partnership. Jack andJill is London Cockney rhyming slang for hill.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for bill.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for till.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for pill.

Meaning of HARRY TATE

HARRY TATE means: Harry Tate is bingo slang for eight.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for late.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for plate.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for a state of agitation or nervousness (state). HarryTate is London Cockney rhyming slang for weight.Harry Tate is British merchant navy slang for mate.

Meaning of DUKE OF YORK

DUKE OF YORK means: Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for chalk. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for cork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for fork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for pork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for talk. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for walk.

Meaning of DAILY MAIL

DAILY MAIL means: Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for tale. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for ale. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for bail. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for nail.Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for the backside, buttocks (tail). Daily Mail is British slang for the sex.

Meaning of Tester

Tester means: An old French silver coin, originally of the value of about eighteen pence, subsequently reduced to ninepence, and later to sixpence, sterling. Hence, in modern English slang, a sixpence; -- often contracted to tizzy. Called also teston.

Meaning of Cockney

Cockney means: A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Meaning of Mill-sixpence

Mill-sixpence means: A milled sixpence; -- the sixpence being one of the first English coins milled (1561).

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Tartan

Tartan means: Woolen cloth, checkered or crossbarred with narrow bands of various colors, much worn in the Highlands of Scotland; hence, any pattern of tartan; also, other material of a similar pattern.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Meaning of Banner

Banner means: Any flag or standard; as, the star-spangled banner.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Meaning of Ensign

Ensign means: A flag; a banner; a standard; esp., the national flag, or a banner indicating nationality, carried by a ship or a body of soldiers; -- as distinguished from flags indicating divisions of the army, rank of naval officers, or private signals, and the like.

Meaning of Flat-cap

Flat-cap means: A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

Meaning of Tanner

Tanner means: One whose occupation is to tan hides, or convert them into leather by the use of tan.

Meaning of Rhyming

Rhyming means: of Rhyme

Meaning of Plaided

Plaided means: Of the material of which plaids are made; tartan.

Meaning of Triplet

Triplet means: Three verses rhyming together.

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Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Accident

Accident means: A quality or attribute in distinction from the substance, as sweetness, softness.

Meaning of Convolvulus

Convolvulus means: A large genus of plants having monopetalous flowers, including the common bindweed (C. arwensis), and formerly the morning-glory, but this is now transferred to the genus Ipomaea.

Meaning of Glonoine

Glonoine means: A dilute solution of nitroglycerin used as a neurotic.

Meaning of Insurant

Insurant means: The person insured.

Meaning of Onerated

Onerated means: of Onerate

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Slang words and meanings

Meaning of ALDGATE EAST

ALDGATE EAST means: Aldgate East is London Cockney rhyming slang for a priest.

Meaning of SNOG

SNOG means: Snog is slang for to kiss lengthily, passionately or lustfully.

Meaning of twig

twig means: Verb. To understand, to realise. E.g."Once I saw the look on her face I twigged it was a joke." {Informal}

Meaning of Tin Tack

Tin Tack means: Sack (fired). He got the tin tack the other day.

Meaning of Tornado Juice

Tornado Juice means: Whiskey.

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