Slang meaning of bent as a nine bob note

bent as a nine bob note means: Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'.

What is the slang meaning/definition of bent as a nine bob note ?

bent as a nine bob note means: Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'.

Slang definition of bent as a nine bob note

bent as a nine bob note means: Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'.

More meanings / definitions of Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'. or words, sentences containing Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'.?

Bent (a. & p. p.): Changed by pressure so as to be no longer straight; crooked; as, a bent pin; a bent lever.

Thebaic (a.): Of or pertaining to Thebes in Egypt; specifically, designating a version of the Bible preserved by the Copts, and esteemed of great value by biblical scholars. This version is also called the Sahidic version.

Version (n.): A condition of the uterus in which its axis is deflected from its normal position without being bent upon itself. See Anteversion, and Retroversion.

Version (n.): A translation; that which is rendered from another language; as, the Common, or Authorized, Version of the Scriptures (see under Authorized); the Septuagint Version of the Old Testament.

Palmcrist (n.): The palma Christi. (Jonah iv. 6, margin, and Douay version, note.)

Bent (v.): The state of being curved, crooked, or inclined from a straight line; flexure; curvity; as, the bent of a bow.

Trombone (n.): A powerful brass instrument of the trumpet kind, thought by some to be the ancient sackbut, consisting of a tube in three parts, bent twice upon itself and ending in a bell. The middle part, bent double, slips into the outer parts, as in a telescope, so that by change of the vibrating length any tone within the compass of the instrument (which may be bass or tenor or alto or even, in rare instances, soprano) is commanded. It is the only member of the family of wind instruments whose scale, both diatonic and chromatic, is complete without the aid of keys or pistons, and which can slide from note to note as smoothly as the human voice or a violin. Softly blown, it has a rich and mellow sound, which becomes harsh and blatant when the tones are forced; used with discretion, its effect is often solemn and majestic.

Itala (n.): An early Latin version of the Scriptures (the Old Testament was translated from the Septuagint, and was also called the Italic version).

Ericius (n.): The Vulgate rendering of the Hebrew word qip/d, which in the "Authorized Version" is translated bittern, and in the Revised Version, porcupine.

Bent (a. & p. p.): Strongly inclined toward something, so as to be resolved, determined, set, etc.; -- said of the mind, character, disposition, desires, etc., and used with on; as, to be bent on going to college; he is bent on mischief.

Note (n.): A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt, and promising payment; as, a promissory note; a note of hand; a negotiable note.

Version (n.): An account or description from a particular point of view, especially as contrasted with another account; as, he gave another version of the affair.

Fitch (n.): A word found in the Authorized Version of the Bible, representing different Hebrew originals. In Isaiah xxviii. 25, 27, it means the black aromatic seeds of Nigella sativa, still used as a flavoring in the East. In Ezekiel iv. 9, the Revised Version now reads spelt.

Shilling (n.): A silver coin, and money of account, of Great Britain and its dependencies, equal to twelve pence, or the twentieth part of a pound, equivalent to about twenty-four cents of the United States currency.

Near (adv.): Close to anything followed or imitated; not free, loose, or rambling; as, a version near to the original.

Turn (n.): An embellishment or grace (marked thus, /), commonly consisting of the principal note, or that on which the turn is made, with the note above, and the semitone below, the note above being sounded first, the principal note next, and the semitone below last, the three being performed quickly, as a triplet preceding the marked note. The turn may be inverted so as to begin with the lower note, in which case the sign is either placed on end thus /, or drawn thus /.

Bank bill (): In America (and formerly in England), a promissory note of a bank payable to the bearer on demand, and used as currency; a bank note.

Vulgate (a.): An ancient Latin version of the Scripture, and the only version which the Roman Church admits to be authentic; -- so called from its common use in the Latin Church.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Crump (a.): Crooked; bent.

Kimbo (a.): Crooked; arched; bent.

Incurvate (a.): Curved; bent; crooked.

Crook (n.): Any implement having a bent or crooked end.

Peshitto (n.): The earliest Syriac version of the Old Testament, translated from Hebrew; also, the incomplete Syriac version of the New Testament.

Semibreve (n.): A note of half the time or duration of the breve; -- now usually called a whole note. It is the longest note in general use.

Money (n.): Any written or stamped promise, certificate, or order, as a government note, a bank note, a certificate of deposit, etc., which is payable in standard coined money and is lawfully current in lieu of it; in a comprehensive sense, any currency usually and lawfully employed in buying and selling.

Bowl-legged (a.): Having crooked legs, esp. with the knees bent outward.

Crooked (a.): Characterized by a crook or curve; not straight; turning; bent; twisted; deformed.

Shilling (n.): The Spanish real, of the value of one eight of a dollar, or 12/ cets; -- formerly so called in New York and some other States. See Note under 2.

Post note (): A note issued by a bank, payable at some future specified time, as distinguished from a note payable on demand.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'.

Meaning of bent as a nine bob note

bent as a nine bob note means: Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'.

Meaning of bent as a nine bob note

bent as a nine bob note means: Positively homosexual. but with decimalization homosexual acts in 1971 became obsolete.

Meaning of queer as a nine bob note

queer as a nine bob note means: Phrs. 1. Very odd, unusual. 2. Undoubtedly homosexual. Cf. 'bent as a nine bob note'.

Meaning of BENT

BENT means: Bent is slang for dishonest; corrupt.Bent is slang for stolen (as applied to goods).Bent is slang for counterfeit.Bent is slang for crazy; mad.Bent is slang for sexually deviant, especially homosexual.

Meaning of Bent as a nine-bob note

Bent as a nine-bob note means:  Metaphor for dishonesty or corruption that references the nine-schilling (bob) note, which does not exist and must therefore be counterfeit.“That street vendor selling watches is bent as a nine-bob note.”

Meaning of bent as a nine pound note

bent as a nine pound note means: Phrs. A modern variation on 'bent as a nine bob note', see above.

Meaning of three ha'pence/three haypence

three ha'pence/three haypence means: 1½d (one and a half old pennies) - this lovely expression (thanks Dean) did not survive decimalisation, despite there being new decimal half-pence coins. In fact the term was obsolete before 1971 decimalisation when the old ha'penny (½d) was removed from the currency in 1969.

Meaning of bob

bob means: n five-pence piece. Before the U.K.’s currency system was decimalised in 1971 and became simply “pounds and pence,” the Brits had “pounds, shillings and pence.” Like all crappy Imperial measures there wasn’t ten or a hundred of anything in anything and good riddance to the lot of it. In order to work out how to pay for anything you had to be able to divide by sixteen and nine tenths, subtracting room temperature. A “bob” was a shilling, and these days it’s still vaguely recognised as meaning five pence. Only vaguely, though.

Meaning of bent as a bottle of chips

bent as a bottle of chips means: Phrs. 1. Homosexual. 2. Crooked, dishonest. See 'bottle of chips'.

Meaning of NINE−BOB NOTE

NINE−BOB NOTE means: Nine−bob note is British slang for a homosexual. Nine−bob note is British slang for a sexual deviant.Nine−bob note is British slang for something fake, counterfeit or crooked.

Meaning of Bent as a Nine-Bob Note

Bent as a Nine-Bob Note means: Homosexual, or very corrupt.

Meaning of bent

bent means: a skewed impression of reality.  "You got me bent, I ain't like that."  2. to be high or drunk.  "Jack got bent last night at that party."  Lyrical reference: ALANIS MORISSETTE LYRICS - Bent 4 U  "I have bent for you and I've deprived..." 

Meaning of camp as a row of pink tents

camp as a row of pink tents means: Phrs. Very 'camp' (see above), or gay. E.g. "He was a camp as a row of pink tents and wouldn't have been out of place in a Mr Gay UK competition." Cf. 'camp as a row of tents'.

Meaning of duke

duke means: Noun. A homosexual. Rhyming slang on Duke of Kent meaning 'bent'. See 'bent'.

Meaning of get jiggy

get jiggy means: Vrb phrs. 1. To be cool and with what's happening that's respected. Apparently originates with Will Smith, U.S. rapper and movie star, and came to prominence with his song Gettin' Jiggy Wit' It. [Orig. U.S. 1990s] 2. To be active, often in a sexual sense. An extended meaning from version 1, above, possibly a misinterpretation of how the original expression was used.

Meaning of NICK−BENT

NICK−BENT means: Nick−bent is British slang for to be temporarily homosexual due to, and for the duration of imprisonment.

Meaning of catch some z's

catch some z's means: Noun. Get some sleep. Pronounced catch some zeds. Original U.S. version is pronounced catch some Zees.

Meaning of camp as a row of tents

camp as a row of tents means: Phrs. See 'camp as a row of pink tents' (above).

Meaning of bob

bob means: shilling (1/-), although in recent times now means a pound or a dollar in certain regions. Historically bob was slang for a British shilling (Twelve old pence, pre-decimalisation - and twenty shillings to a pound). No plural version; it was 'thirty bob' not 'thirty bobs'. Prior to 1971 bob was one of the most commonly used English slang words. Now sadly gone in the UK for this particular meaning, although lots of other meanings remain (for example the verb or noun meaning of pooh, a haircut, and the verb meaning of cheat). Usage of bob for shilling dates back to the late 1700s. Origin is not known for sure. Possibilities include a connection with the church or bell-ringing since 'bob' meant a set of changes rung on the bells. This would be consistent with one of the possible origins and associations of the root of the word Shilling, (from Proto-Germanic 'skell' meaning to sound or ring). There is possibly an association with plumb-bob, being another symbolic piece of metal, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. Brewer's 1870 Dictionary of Phrase and Fable states that 'bob' could be derived from 'Bawbee', which was 16-19th century slang for a half-penny, in turn derived from: French 'bas billon', meaning debased copper money (coins were commonly cut to make change). Brewer also references the Laird of Sillabawby, a 16th century mintmaster, as a possible origin. Also perhaps a connection with a plumb-bob, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. 'Bob a nob', in the early 1800s meant 'a shilling a head', when estimating costs of meals, etc. In the 18th century 'bobstick' was a shillings-worth of gin. In parts of the US 'bob' was used for the US dollar coin. I am also informed (thanks K Inglott, March 2007) that bob is now slang for a pound in his part of the world (Bath, South-West England), and has also been used as money slang, presumably for Australian dollars, on the Home and Away TV soap series. A popular slang word like bob arguably develops a life of its own. Additionally (ack Martin Symington, Jun 2007) the word 'bob' is still commonly used among the white community of Tanzania in East Africa for the Tanzanian Shilling.

Meaning of bent

bent means: Adj. 1. Homosexual, as opposed to 'straight'. Derog. [Mid 1900s] 2. Criminal, corrupt. E.g."You can usually buy your freedom; the cops are bent and paid poorly." [Early 1900s] 3. Illegal, stolen. E.g."I'm not touching that video, it's bent." [Early 1900s]

Meaning of Bent

Bent means: Changed by pressure so as to be no longer straight; crooked; as, a bent pin; a bent lever.

Meaning of Thebaic

Thebaic means: Of or pertaining to Thebes in Egypt; specifically, designating a version of the Bible preserved by the Copts, and esteemed of great value by biblical scholars. This version is also called the Sahidic version.

Meaning of Version

Version means: A condition of the uterus in which its axis is deflected from its normal position without being bent upon itself. See Anteversion, and Retroversion.

Meaning of Version

Version means: A translation; that which is rendered from another language; as, the Common, or Authorized, Version of the Scriptures (see under Authorized); the Septuagint Version of the Old Testament.

Meaning of Palmcrist

Palmcrist means: The palma Christi. (Jonah iv. 6, margin, and Douay version, note.)

Meaning of Bent

Bent means: The state of being curved, crooked, or inclined from a straight line; flexure; curvity; as, the bent of a bow.

Meaning of Trombone

Trombone means: A powerful brass instrument of the trumpet kind, thought by some to be the ancient sackbut, consisting of a tube in three parts, bent twice upon itself and ending in a bell. The middle part, bent double, slips into the outer parts, as in a telescope, so that by change of the vibrating length any tone within the compass of the instrument (which may be bass or tenor or alto or even, in rare instances, soprano) is commanded. It is the only member of the family of wind instruments whose scale, both diatonic and chromatic, is complete without the aid of keys or pistons, and which can slide from note to note as smoothly as the human voice or a violin. Softly blown, it has a rich and mellow sound, which becomes harsh and blatant when the tones are forced; used with discretion, its effect is often solemn and majestic.

Meaning of Itala

Itala means: An early Latin version of the Scriptures (the Old Testament was translated from the Septuagint, and was also called the Italic version).

Meaning of Ericius

Ericius means: The Vulgate rendering of the Hebrew word qip/d, which in the "Authorized Version" is translated bittern, and in the Revised Version, porcupine.

Meaning of Bent

Bent means: Strongly inclined toward something, so as to be resolved, determined, set, etc.; -- said of the mind, character, disposition, desires, etc., and used with on; as, to be bent on going to college; he is bent on mischief.

Meaning of Note

Note means: A written or printed paper acknowledging a debt, and promising payment; as, a promissory note; a note of hand; a negotiable note.

Meaning of Version

Version means: An account or description from a particular point of view, especially as contrasted with another account; as, he gave another version of the affair.

Meaning of Fitch

Fitch means: A word found in the Authorized Version of the Bible, representing different Hebrew originals. In Isaiah xxviii. 25, 27, it means the black aromatic seeds of Nigella sativa, still used as a flavoring in the East. In Ezekiel iv. 9, the Revised Version now reads spelt.

Meaning of Shilling

Shilling means: A silver coin, and money of account, of Great Britain and its dependencies, equal to twelve pence, or the twentieth part of a pound, equivalent to about twenty-four cents of the United States currency.

Meaning of Near

Near means: Close to anything followed or imitated; not free, loose, or rambling; as, a version near to the original.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Bonnet

Bonnet means: A metallic canopy, or projection, over an opening, as a fireplace, or a cowl or hood to increase the draught of a chimney, etc.

Meaning of Foxtail

Foxtail means: The name of several kinds of grass having a soft dense head of flowers, mostly the species of Alopecurus and Setaria.

Meaning of Gaskins

Gaskins means: Loose hose or breeches; galligaskins.

Meaning of Immixture

Immixture means: Freedom from mixture; purity.

Meaning of Serranoid

Serranoid means: Of or pertaining to the Serranidae.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of BUM GRAVY

BUM GRAVY means: Bum gravy is slang for diarrhoea.

Meaning of wood / woody

wood / woody means: Noun. An erect penis.

Meaning of Squiffy

Squiffy means: Boyfriend or girlfriend.

Meaning of WOLF

WOLF means: PCP

Tags: Slang Meaning of Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'. . The slang definition of Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'. . Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'. ? Please, add a definition of Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'. if you did not find one from a search of Phrs. 1. Homosexual. See 'bent'. 2. Crooked, dishonest. A catch-phrase whose original meaning was version 2, but with the onset of 'bent' referring to homosexually has come to be heard more with regard to version 1. In British currency, a bob was a slang expression for a shilling (five pence) but with decimalization in 1971 became obsolete.There was never any such thing as a nine bob note, hence the simile. Cf. 'queer as a nine bob note' and 'camp as a row of tents'. .

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