Slang meaning of mug up

mug up means: Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s]

What is the slang meaning/definition of mug up ?

mug up means: Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s]

Slang definition of mug up

mug up means: Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s]

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More meanings / definitions of Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s] or words, sentences containing Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s]?

Learn (v. t.): To gain knowledge or information of; to ascertain by inquiry, study, or investigation; to receive instruction concerning; to fix in the mind; to acquire understanding of, or skill; as, to learn the way; to learn a lesson; to learn dancing; to learn to skate; to learn the violin; to learn the truth about something.

Revise (v. t.): To review, alter, and amend; as, to revise statutes; to revise an agreement; to revise a dictionary.

Revise (v. t.): To look at again for the detection of errors; to reexamine; to review; to look over with care for correction; as, to revise a writing; to revise a translation.

Informal (a.): Not in the regular, usual, or established form; not according to official, conventional, prescribed, or customary forms or rules; irregular; hence, without ceremony; as, an informal writting, proceeding, or visit.

Desiderative (n.): A verb formed from another verb by a change of termination, and expressing the desire of doing that which is indicated by the primitive verb.

Voice (n.): A particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs, or a particular form of a verb, by means of which is indicated the relation of the subject of the verb to the action which the verb expresses.

Apt (a.): Ready; especially fitted or qualified (to do something); quick to learn; prompt; expert; as, a pupil apt to learn; an apt scholar.

Lear (v. t.): To learn. See Lere, to learn.

Participle (n.): A part of speech partaking of the nature both verb and adjective; a form of a verb, or verbal adjective, modifying a noun, but taking the adjuncts of the verb from which it is derived. In the sentences: a letter is written; being asleep he did not hear; exhausted by toil he will sleep soundly, -- written, being, and exhaustedare participles.

That (pron., a., conj., & ): To introduce a clause employed as the object of the preceding verb, or as the subject or predicate nominative of a verb.

May (v.): An auxiliary verb qualifyng the meaning of another verb, by expressing: (a) Ability, competency, or possibility; -- now oftener expressed by can.

Verify (v. t.): To make into a verb; to use as a verb; to verbalize.

Objective (a.): Pertaining to, or designating, the case which follows a transitive verb or a preposition, being that case in which the direct object of the verb is placed. See Accusative, n.

Theme (n.): A noun or verb, not modified by inflections; also, that part of a noun or verb which remains unchanged (except by euphonic variations) in declension or conjugation; stem.

Staying (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Stay

Inflect (v. t.): To vary, as a noun or a verb in its terminations; to decline, as a noun or adjective, or to conjugate, as a verb.

Commoration (n.): The act of staying or residing in a place.

Haunt (v. i.): To persist in staying or visiting.

Auxiliary (sing.): A verb which helps to form the voices, modes, and tenses of other verbs; -- called, also, an auxiliary verb; as, have, be, may, can, do, must, shall, and will, in English; etre and avoir, in French; avere and essere, in Italian; estar and haber, in Spanish.

To (prep.): As sign of the infinitive, to had originally the use of last defined, governing the infinitive as a verbal noun, and connecting it as indirect object with a preceding verb or adjective; thus, ready to go, i.e., ready unto going; good to eat, i.e., good for eating; I do my utmost to lead my life pleasantly. But it has come to be the almost constant prefix to the infinitive, even in situations where it has no prepositional meaning, as where the infinitive is direct object or subject; thus, I love to learn, i.e., I love learning; to die for one's country is noble, i.e., the dying for one's country. Where the infinitive denotes the design or purpose, good usage formerly allowed the prefixing of for to the to; as, what went ye out for see? (Matt. xi. 8).

Revising (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Revise

Revisit (v. t.): To revise.

Revised (imp. & p. p.): of Revise

Verbal (a.): Of or pertaining to a verb; as, a verbal group; derived directly from a verb; as, a verbal noun; used in forming verbs; as, a verbal prefix.

Revise (n.): A review; a revision.

Recense (v. t.): To review; to revise.

Rhematic (a.): Having a verb for its base; derived from a verb; as, rhematic adjectives.

Substantive (a.): Betokening or expressing existence; as, the substantive verb, that is, the verb to be.

Persistent (a.): Inclined to persist; having staying qualities; tenacious of position or purpose.

Consistory (n.): Primarily, a place of standing or staying together; hence, any solemn assembly or council.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s]?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s]

Meaning of mug up

mug up means: Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s]

Meaning of swot

swot means: Noun. A person who studies hard. {Informal}Verb. To study hard. E.g."Timmy had been swotting for 3 months, but still failed his exams." {Informal}

Meaning of rubberneck

rubberneck means: Verb. To stare inquisitively, to gawp. Derived from the rarely used noun rubbernecker. {Informal} [Orig. U.S.. Late 1800s]

Meaning of jack

jack means: Verb. To steal, often in relation to mugging. From hijack. E.g."My phone got jacked when I was on my way home."

Meaning of whinge

whinge means: Verb. To persistently complain, in an irritating manner. {Informal}Noun. To act in the manner of the verb. {Informal}.

Meaning of twag

twag means: Verb. To play traunt. E.g."No wonder he failed his exams, he's been twagging for most of the last year." [Hull/Lincolnshire use]

Meaning of learn you

learn you means: to teach someone a lesson.  "Boy, I'm gonna learn you!" 

Meaning of barney

barney means: Noun. An argument. [Late 1800s] {Informal}

Meaning of pong

pong means: Noun. An unpleasant smell. {Informal}Verb. To stink. {Informal}

Meaning of whack

whack means: Verb. 1. To promptly insert or place (something). E.g."Whack the contract in an envelope and send it off first post." 2. Hit or strike. {Informal}Noun. 1. A hard blow. {Informal} 2. When in the expressions 'full whack' or 'top whack', meaning maximum price or rate. {Informal}

Meaning of scoff

scoff means: Verb. To eat. {Informal}Noun. Food. {Informal}

Meaning of waste

waste means: Verb. To kill, to thoroughly beat up. E.g."My mum will waste me for failing my exams for a third time."

Meaning of blub

blub means: Verb. To sob. Possibly onomatopoeic. [Mid 1800s]

Meaning of French letter

French letter means: Noun. A condom. Dated expression and rarely heard. [Mid 1800s] {Informal}

Meaning of shite

shite means: Noun / Verb. See 'shit'. [Orig. Northern use. 1800s]

Meaning of cream

cream means: Verb. 1. To ejaculate. To cream oneself implies great sexual excitement, but often used figuratively. 2. To succeed. E.g."I thought I'd creamed my exams but I failed all but one."

Meaning of row

row means: Noun. 1. A noisy quarrel. {Informal} 2. A loud noise. {Informal}Verb. To have a noisy quarrel. E.g."The neighbours have been rowing all night and I havent slept for the noise." {Informal}

Meaning of slummock

slummock means: Noun. A dirty, untidy or lazy person. {Informal}Verb. To behave in a lazy and unkempt fashion. {Informal}

Meaning of shift

shift means: Verb. 1. To move quickly. E.g."You should have seen him shift when I told him they were giving away free beer downstairs." {Informal} 2. To consume large amounts of drink or food. {Informal}

Meaning of waffle

waffle means: Verb. To talk aimlessly. {Informal}Noun. Aimless talk, nonsense. {Informal}

Meaning of Learn

Learn means: To gain knowledge or information of; to ascertain by inquiry, study, or investigation; to receive instruction concerning; to fix in the mind; to acquire understanding of, or skill; as, to learn the way; to learn a lesson; to learn dancing; to learn to skate; to learn the violin; to learn the truth about something.

Meaning of Revise

Revise means: To review, alter, and amend; as, to revise statutes; to revise an agreement; to revise a dictionary.

Meaning of Revise

Revise means: To look at again for the detection of errors; to reexamine; to review; to look over with care for correction; as, to revise a writing; to revise a translation.

Meaning of Informal

Informal means: Not in the regular, usual, or established form; not according to official, conventional, prescribed, or customary forms or rules; irregular; hence, without ceremony; as, an informal writting, proceeding, or visit.

Meaning of Desiderative

Desiderative means: A verb formed from another verb by a change of termination, and expressing the desire of doing that which is indicated by the primitive verb.

Meaning of Voice

Voice means: A particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs, or a particular form of a verb, by means of which is indicated the relation of the subject of the verb to the action which the verb expresses.

Meaning of Apt

Apt means: Ready; especially fitted or qualified (to do something); quick to learn; prompt; expert; as, a pupil apt to learn; an apt scholar.

Meaning of Lear

Lear means: To learn. See Lere, to learn.

Meaning of Participle

Participle means: A part of speech partaking of the nature both verb and adjective; a form of a verb, or verbal adjective, modifying a noun, but taking the adjuncts of the verb from which it is derived. In the sentences: a letter is written; being asleep he did not hear; exhausted by toil he will sleep soundly, -- written, being, and exhaustedare participles.

Meaning of That

That means: To introduce a clause employed as the object of the preceding verb, or as the subject or predicate nominative of a verb.

Meaning of May

May means: An auxiliary verb qualifyng the meaning of another verb, by expressing: (a) Ability, competency, or possibility; -- now oftener expressed by can.

Meaning of Verify

Verify means: To make into a verb; to use as a verb; to verbalize.

Meaning of Objective

Objective means: Pertaining to, or designating, the case which follows a transitive verb or a preposition, being that case in which the direct object of the verb is placed. See Accusative, n.

Meaning of Theme

Theme means: A noun or verb, not modified by inflections; also, that part of a noun or verb which remains unchanged (except by euphonic variations) in declension or conjugation; stem.

Meaning of Staying

Staying means: of Stay

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Compotator

Compotator means: One who drinks with another.

Meaning of Heel

Heel means: To perform by the use of the heels, as in dancing, running, and the like.

Meaning of Motif

Motif means: Motive.

Meaning of Shad

Shad means: Any one of several species of food fishes of the Herring family. The American species (Clupea sapidissima), which is abundant on the Atlantic coast and ascends the larger rivers in spring to spawn, is an important market fish. The European allice shad, or alose (C. alosa), and the twaite shad. (C. finta), are less important species.

Meaning of Squamella

Squamella means: A diminutive scale or bractlet, such as those found on the receptacle in many composite plants; a palea.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of PAPA OSCAR

PAPA OSCAR means: Papa oscar is British slang for go away! (piss off).

Meaning of SIGGING

SIGGING means: Sigging is Black American slang for comepting in rounds of ritualised mocking.

Meaning of DYNO-PURE

DYNO-PURE means: heroin

Meaning of Nigloo

Nigloo means: In northern Canada, it refers to Blacks living way up north in the cold with the Eskimos.

Tags: Slang Meaning of Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s]. The slang definition of Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s]. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s]? Please, add a definition of Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s] if you did not find one from a search of Verb. To revise, learn. E.g."I've been staying in at the weekends, mugging up for my exams." {Informal} [Mid 1800s].

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