Slang meaning of 5 - 0

5 - 0 means: n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!" 

What is the slang meaning/definition of 5 - 0 ?

5 - 0 means: n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!" 

Slang definition of 5 - 0

5 - 0 means: n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!" 

More meanings / definitions of n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!"  or words, sentences containing n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!" ?

Patrol (v.): t To go the rounds of, as a sentry, guard, or policeman; as, to patrol a frontier; to patrol a beat.

Asper (n.): The rough breathing; a mark (/) placed over an initial vowel sound or over / to show that it is aspirated, that is, pronounced with h before it; thus "ws, pronounced h/s, "rh`twr, pronounced hra"t/r.

Term (n.): The limitation of an estate; or rather, the whole time for which an estate is granted, as for the term of a life or lives, or for a term of years.

Dimension (n.): A literal factor, as numbered in characterizing a term. The term dimensions forms with the cardinal numbers a phrase equivalent to degree with the ordinal; thus, a2b2c is a term of five dimensions, or of the fifth degree.

Term (n.): The time for which anything lasts; any limited time; as, a term of five years; the term of life.

Sentence (n.): In civil and admiralty law, the judgment of a court pronounced in a cause; in criminal and ecclesiastical courts, a judgment passed on a criminal by a court or judge; condemnation pronounced by a judgical tribunal; doom. In common law, the term is exclusively used to denote the judgment in criminal cases.

Policeman (n.): A member of a body of police; a constable.

Degree (n.): State as indicated by sum of exponents; more particularly, the degree of a term is indicated by the sum of the exponents of its literal factors; thus, a2b3c is a term of the sixth degree. The degree of a power, or radical, is denoted by its index, that of an equation by the greatest sum of the exponents of the unknown quantities in any term; thus, ax4 + bx2 = c, and mx2y2 + nyx = p, are both equations of the fourth degree.

Patrol (v. i.): To go the rounds along a chain of sentinels; to traverse a police district or beat.

Univocal (n.): A generic term, or a term applicable in the same sense to all the species it embraces.

Terminus (n.): Hence, any post or stone marking a boundary; a term. See Term, 8.

Sea term (): A term used specifically by seamen; a nautical word or phrase.

Term (n.): A word or expression; specifically, one that has a precisely limited meaning in certain relations and uses, or is peculiar to a science, art, profession, or the like; as, a technical term.

Term (n.): In universities, schools, etc., a definite continuous period during which instruction is regularly given to students; as, the school year is divided into three terms.

Patrol (v. i.): Any perambulation of a particular line or district to guard it; also, the men thus guarding; as, a customs patrol; a fire patrol.

Bobby (n.): A nickname for a policeman; -- from Sir Robert Peel, who remodeled the police force. See Peeler.

Term (n.): To apply a term to; to name; to call; to denominate.

Hawaiian (a.): Belonging to Hawaii or the Sandwich Islands, or to the people of Hawaii.

Marry (interj.): Indeed ! in truth ! -- a term of asseveration said to have been derived from the practice of swearing by the Virgin Mary.

Final (a.): Pertaining to the end or conclusion; last; terminating; ultimate; as, the final day of a school term.

Spice (v. t.): To season with spice, or as with spice; to mix aromatic or pungent substances with; to flavor; to season; as, to spice wine; to spice one's words with wit.

Privative (n.): A term indicating the absence of any quality which might be naturally or rationally expected; -- called also privative term.

Term (n.): A point, line, or superficies, that limits; as, a line is the term of a superficies, and a superficies is the term of a solid.

Termly (adv.): Term by term; every term.

Mufti (n.): Citizen's dress when worn by a naval or military officer; -- a term derived from the British service in India.

Augmentative (n.): A word which expresses with augmented force the idea or the properties of the term from which it is derived; as, dullard, one very dull. Opposed to diminutive.

Concrete (n.): A term designating both a quality and the subject in which it exists; a concrete term.

Negative (n.): A proposition by which something is denied or forbidden; a conception or term formed by prefixing the negative particle to one which is positive; an opposite or contradictory term or conception.

Cynic (n.): One of a sect or school of philosophers founded by Antisthenes, and of whom Diogenes was a disciple. The first Cynics were noted for austere lives and their scorn for social customs and current philosophical opinions. Hence the term Cynic symbolized, in the popular judgment, moroseness, and contempt for the views of others.

Consequent (n.): The second term of a ratio, as the term b in the ratio a:b, the first a, being the antecedent.

Like to add another meaning or definition of n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!" ?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!" 

Meaning of 5 - 0

5 - 0 means: n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!" 

Meaning of one-time

one-time means: n. a policeman.  "Watch out! One-time!"  2. n. a person who commits one offense and is now watched by the police. This term was derived when laws were passed during the late 80’s and early 90’s for cruising. If the same police officer saw you three times, they could pull you over and cite you for cruising. Thus, the term started when cruisers would cry out when a police was cited the “first time” “Yo, that’s one time!” The term became popularized by Ice Cube, Compton’s Most Wanted, Ice T, and Tupac Shakur in many of their songs. 

Meaning of spice

spice means: A term for sweets or candy. e.g. "Can I have some SPICE please mam?" , I used this term in school around Sheffield in the late 70's/ early 80's, and it seems to be still in use.(term may have spread out into Yorkshire).

Meaning of pig

pig means: Policeman - or woman (let's not be sexist in here eh?) Randy says: "I noticed you don't have any background on the word "pig" meaning the police. Based on hearsay from a friend, this is a code term used by truckers when they see a highway patrol or radar trap and wish to warn their fellow trucker(s) by r adio message, which can be tapped into by police. The example of context I heard was "There's a pig running beside the road". (ed: trouble is it doesn't really explain *where* it came from or how, or why) Keith says it came into common use around the time of the Vietnam War: Re origin of 'pig'. Like fuzz I think this originated during the hippy/anti-Vietnam protest era. The origin is fairly obvious - the most contemptible term anyone could think of for the police.

Meaning of O.G.

O.G. means: Derived from “Orginal Gangsta.” A term referring to a real gangster, not one of the “many wanna-be’s posing” out there. The term was popularized by old school rapper Ice-T in his song "O.G." back in the 90's. The term then gained commercial notoriety.  Lyrical reference: O.G. - ICE-T (Album: O.G. Original Gangster, 1991) 

Meaning of Gat

Gat means: n. A gun (derived from Gatling gun). This term came of age during the late 80’s when rap groups such as NWA used the term for guns. *Although this term is not widely used anymore, it still bears stating as it has had use and could be still in circulation in certain contexts.  "Paul, you didn’t tell me you was strapped! Why you gotta have a Gat?" 

Meaning of five-oh

five-oh means: Police: could be spelled numerically as "50". Five-oh is 50 is like "Hawaii 50", the TV show. It means cops, police, law enforcement. Ghetto slang for the police. I hope the five-oh doesn't read this.

Meaning of fuzz

fuzz means: The police. General term for any law enforcement operatives. (ed: anyone got any idea why the police became known as fuzz) Martin couldn't help with the origins but suggested the word was used to describe the police during the late sixties and seventies but is less common today, in N. America at least. Keith suggests this origin: It originated in the 60s hippies days, when crewcuts/skinhead cuts were de rigeur for the police, as opposed to the flowing locks of those using the word. Normal usage in late 60s/early 70s UK - I think the musical 'Hair' may have popularised it.

Meaning of Bill

Bill means: n the police, in the same sort of a way as “Plod.” There are two possible etymologies: The first, that it’s after William Wilberforce, a Member of Parliament who first proposed a U.K. police service. The second, that all police cars originally had the letters “BYL” in their number plates. The Bill is also a popular U.K. television drama about a police station.

Meaning of apple catchers

apple catchers means: Derogatory term for someone wearing unflattering big underwear. Example: 'that fat old trout had a pair of frilly apple catchers on'. This is a term used in Herefordshire term (west country) and probably comes from this area having a large number of orchards for cider making. Contributor says it must be a old term as his dad and his mates use it and the kids in school used it at school and continue the tradition to this day.

Meaning of gool, gools, glue

gool, gools, glue means: These words were used interchangeably as the term meaning "home base" when playing tag. When the game of tag began, someone would specify what Gool or Glue would be, and that object would be the home base where one could be "safe" from being tagged. Similar to 'Base'. Alternative viewpoint: I grew up in New England in the late 70's and the term "gools" was completely ubiquitous as a singular noun. "Glue" was never used to mean "home base", but if "gool" was used, I never noticed. It's possible that "gools" evolved from "gool" through the expression "No gool(s) sticking!" (ie. don't hover around home base because it doesn't give other players a fair chance of reaching it.) Even as an adult, if talk of childhood games ever comes up with peers who grew up in different parts of New England, there's a nostalgic spark if "gools" (and notably not "gool") is mentioned as we all immediately recognize the word and at the same time note what a silly word it really is. (ed: which opened the door as usual for additional input and Arrigo sent the following in!) I am happy to see that the word gools appears in your dictionary. It was the first thing I thought of when I found out about your site, and, sure enough, there it was. It is erroneous to say it originated in the 1970s because the term was around the Phineas Bates elementary school in Roslindale Massachusetts (a neighborhood in Boston) in the 1940s when I was a kid. It was used mostly in the game of "hide and go se ek" similarly to the way in which the dictionary says it was used for "tag". The term "gools sticker" (pronounced "goolsticka") was also used. I have always wondered about its etymology. One of my theories is that it was a corrupt ion of the word "goal" that somehow took on an "s" at the end, perhaps as stated in the dictionary. Another possibility is a much older root from the archaic heraldic word "gules", which means "red" and is derived from the Latin gul a, meaning "throat". Anyhow, if a kid who was hiding touched the gools before the seeker saw him or her and got back to the gools first, then he/she would cry out "my gools 1-2- 3".

Meaning of scrote

scrote means: It is a slang term for scrotum, but used in a derogatory way for when you are pissed off at a man, for whatever reason. Used as, "Give me back my tampon, you friggin scrote!", or "My stepson is such a scrote.", or "That big, hairy scrote is tailgating me in his big scrotemobile!", and "Don't be a scrote; give me a ride to school?". In most cases, this term refers to a man, but can be used for a manish woman. Contributor first heard this term a few years ago when her friend was mad at her step son and called him a "Scrote". She laughed so hard that she almost fell out of my chair and has been using the term ever since! Her female friends in Germany and Austria are using this term now, since she told them about it. They love it because they can insult their male friends and the male friends don't have a clue as to what a scrote is!

Meaning of balls deep

balls deep means: v. A vile term that refers to when you're making a huge commitment to something like a sport or school, or drinking or partying. The term is derived from an obvious explicit sexual description.  "That dude is the best at skateboarding. Yeah man, he's balls deep." 

Meaning of bacon

bacon means: A term for the police. Derived from the earlier reference to police as “pigs.”  "You smell bacon? Oh snap! Here comes 5.0." 

Meaning of camp

camp means: Was for many years the term of choice in the UK for describing the 'characteristic homosexual behaviours' such as assumed effeminacy but was supplanted by the US term 'gay'. Hence the expression to 'camp it up', and the 'hidden' joke in the film title 'Carry on Camping'. The word (and many other underground gay terms) was popularised and brought to general public attention and useage by the late 1950's radio show 'Round the Horne'.

Meaning of swats

swats means: Pronounced like "HATS". A term for sweets and candy.e.g. "Gis' a SWAT!", when the contributor was at school - but seems to have fallen out of favour.

Meaning of APPOINTMENT TELEVISION

APPOINTMENT TELEVISION means: Appointment television is television industry slang for the viewing habits of people who plan in advance to watch only certain television programmes.

Meaning of bacon sarnie

bacon sarnie means: Police car. So called because of white/red/white colouring. Often used inconjunction with the term 'rasher' for policeman (from other slang terms for the police. i.e. 'rozzer' and 'pig). Used as "Look. Two rashers in a bacon sarnie!".

Meaning of sweet

sweet means: adj./adv. (sometimes pronounced "saw-wheat") A late 80's term for very good, excellent.  "His corvette was sweet!" 

Meaning of git

git means: (1) An excessively stupid or unpleasant person. (2) term of abuse misinterpreted at West Lodge Middle School, Pinner, Middlesex in late- '70s, where rumour circulated that it was the proper scientific term for "a pregnant camel". Hence common playground dialogue: "You git!". "Fuck off, I am not a pregnant camel" (ed: strangely enough I grew up under the impression a 'git' was the child of an Irish prostitute. We 'learn' such odd stuff when we are kids!)

Meaning of Patrol

Patrol means: t To go the rounds of, as a sentry, guard, or policeman; as, to patrol a frontier; to patrol a beat.

Meaning of Asper

Asper means: The rough breathing; a mark (/) placed over an initial vowel sound or over / to show that it is aspirated, that is, pronounced with h before it; thus "ws, pronounced h/s, "rh`twr, pronounced hra"t/r.

Meaning of Term

Term means: The limitation of an estate; or rather, the whole time for which an estate is granted, as for the term of a life or lives, or for a term of years.

Meaning of Dimension

Dimension means: A literal factor, as numbered in characterizing a term. The term dimensions forms with the cardinal numbers a phrase equivalent to degree with the ordinal; thus, a2b2c is a term of five dimensions, or of the fifth degree.

Meaning of Term

Term means: The time for which anything lasts; any limited time; as, a term of five years; the term of life.

Meaning of Sentence

Sentence means: In civil and admiralty law, the judgment of a court pronounced in a cause; in criminal and ecclesiastical courts, a judgment passed on a criminal by a court or judge; condemnation pronounced by a judgical tribunal; doom. In common law, the term is exclusively used to denote the judgment in criminal cases.

Meaning of Policeman

Policeman means: A member of a body of police; a constable.

Meaning of Degree

Degree means: State as indicated by sum of exponents; more particularly, the degree of a term is indicated by the sum of the exponents of its literal factors; thus, a2b3c is a term of the sixth degree. The degree of a power, or radical, is denoted by its index, that of an equation by the greatest sum of the exponents of the unknown quantities in any term; thus, ax4 + bx2 = c, and mx2y2 + nyx = p, are both equations of the fourth degree.

Meaning of Patrol

Patrol means: To go the rounds along a chain of sentinels; to traverse a police district or beat.

Meaning of Univocal

Univocal means: A generic term, or a term applicable in the same sense to all the species it embraces.

Meaning of Terminus

Terminus means: Hence, any post or stone marking a boundary; a term. See Term, 8.

Meaning of Sea term

Sea term means: A term used specifically by seamen; a nautical word or phrase.

Meaning of Term

Term means: A word or expression; specifically, one that has a precisely limited meaning in certain relations and uses, or is peculiar to a science, art, profession, or the like; as, a technical term.

Meaning of Term

Term means: In universities, schools, etc., a definite continuous period during which instruction is regularly given to students; as, the school year is divided into three terms.

Meaning of Patrol

Patrol means: Any perambulation of a particular line or district to guard it; also, the men thus guarding; as, a customs patrol; a fire patrol.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Gallin

Gallin means: A substance obtained by the reduction of gallein.

Meaning of Mousing

Mousing means: The act of hunting mice.

Meaning of Raiment

Raiment means: An article of dress.

Meaning of Semele

Semele means: A daughter of Cadmus, and by Zeus mother of Bacchus.

Meaning of Whip

Whip means: To strike with a lash, a cord, a rod, or anything slender and lithe; to lash; to beat; as, to whip a horse, or a carpet.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of Redundancy

Redundancy means: If you are made redundant it means you are laid off.

Meaning of spawney

spawney means: Lucky, jammy, flukey. Usually associated with 'get' as in "That spawney get is so jammy he'd lose 10p and find a fiver!"

Meaning of Roast Pork

Roast Pork means: Fork

Meaning of EGG

EGG means: crack

Meaning of Barefoot

Barefoot means:   unshod horse.

Tags: Slang Meaning of n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!" . The slang definition of n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!" . Did you find the slang meaning/definition of n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!" ? Please, add a definition of n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!"  if you did not find one from a search of n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!" .

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