Slang meaning of central reservation

central reservation means: n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might.

What is the slang meaning/definition of central reservation ?

central reservation means: n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might.

Slang definition of central reservation

central reservation means: n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might.

More meanings / definitions of n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might. or words, sentences containing n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might.?

Implore (v. t.): To call upon, or for, in supplication; to beseech; to prey to, or for, earnestly; to petition with urency; to entreat; to beg; -- followed directly by the word expressing the thing sought, or the person from whom it is sought.

Call (v. t.): To state, or estimate, approximately or loosely; to characterize without strict regard to fact; as, they call the distance ten miles; he called it a full day's work.

Cafe (n.): A coffeehouse; a restaurant; also, a room in a hotel or restaurant where coffee and liquors are served.

Booking clerk (): A clerk who registers passengers, baggage, etc., for conveyance, as by railway or steamship, or who sells passage tickets at a booking office.

Warm (superl.): In children's games, being near the object sought for; hence, being close to the discovery of some person, thing, or fact concealed.

Farfetched (a.): Studiously sought; not easily or naturally deduced or introduced; forced; strained.

Call (v. t.): To utter in a loud or distinct voice; -- often with off; as, to call, or call off, the items of an account; to call the roll of a military company.

Call (v. i.): To make a brief visit; also, to stop at some place designated, as for orders.

Hollo (interj. & n.): Ho there; stop; attend; hence, a loud cry or a call to attract attention; a halloo.

Mesethmoid (n.): The median vertical plate, or median element, of the ethmoid bone.

Grassy (a.): Covered with grass; abounding with grass; as, a grassy lawn.

Stop-over (a.): Permitting one to stop over; as, a stop-over check or ticket. See To stop over, under Stop, v. i.

Median (a.): Situated in the middle; lying in a plane dividing a bilateral animal into right and left halves; -- said of unpaired organs and parts; as, median coverts.

Collisive (a.): Colliding; clashing.

Monger (v. t.): To deal in; to make merchandise of; to traffic in; -- used chiefly of discreditable traffic.

Fact (n.): Reality; actuality; truth; as, he, in fact, excelled all the rest; the fact is, he was beaten.

Stop (v. t.): To arrest the progress of; to hinder; to impede; to shut in; as, to stop a traveler; to stop the course of a stream, or a flow of blood.

Traffic (v. t.): To exchange in traffic; to effect by a bargain or for a consideration.

Median (n.): A median line or point.

Call (n.): The act of calling; -- usually with the voice, but often otherwise, as by signs, the sound of some instrument, or by writing; a summons; an entreaty; an invitation; as, a call for help; the bugle's call.

Area (n.): Extent; scope; range; as, a wide area of thought.

Area (n.): A spot or small marked space; as, the germinative area.

Arbitrage (n.): A traffic in bills of exchange (see Arbitration of Exchange); also, a traffic in stocks which bear differing values at the same time in different markets.

Easily (adv.): With ease; without difficulty or much effort; as, this task may be easily performed; that event might have been easily foreseen.

Stop (n.): Some part of the articulating organs, as the lips, or the tongue and palate, closed (a) so as to cut off the passage of breath or voice through the mouth and the nose (distinguished as a lip-stop, or a front-stop, etc., as in p, t, d, etc.), or (b) so as to obstruct, but not entirely cut off, the passage, as in l, n, etc.; also, any of the consonants so formed.

Cottise (n.): A diminutive of the bendlet, containing one half its area or one quarter the area of the bend. When a single cottise is used alone it is often called a cost. See also Couple-close.

Area (n.): The superficial contents of any figure; the surface included within any given lines; superficial extent; as, the area of a square or a triangle.

Booking (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Book

Square (n.): An area of four sides, generally with houses on each side; sometimes, a solid block of houses; also, an open place or area for public use, as at the meeting or intersection of two or more streets.

Estoppel (n.): A stop; an obstruction or bar to one's alleging or denying a fact contrary to his own previous action, allegation, or denial; an admission, by words or conduct, which induces another to purchase rights, against which the party making such admission can not take a position inconsistent with the admission.

Like to add another meaning or definition of n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might.

Meaning of central reservation

central reservation means: n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might.

Meaning of lay-by

lay-by means: n rest area. A little parking area off the side of a main road (usually a motorway), where people generally stop to have a sandwich, let their children vomit, empty the dog or copulate with their work colleagues. Perhaps this is where the name came from.

Meaning of jam

jam means: n jelly. Sort of. What Americans call “jelly” (fruit preserve without fruity-bits in it), Brits still call jam. What Americans call “jello,” Brits call “jelly.” Oh yes, and what Americans call “jam” is still also called jam in the U.K. I think that’s the jams pretty much covered.

Meaning of pavement

pavement means: n sidewalk. Brits call the part that cars drive on “Tarmac.” I wonder how many holidaymakers have been run over as a result of this confusion. Well, probably none really. I digress. Historically, “sidewalk” is in fact an old, now-unused British English word meaning exactly what the Americans take it to mean.

Meaning of Pelican crossing

Pelican crossing means: n pedestrian crossing. An area of the road, marked with black and white stripes, where traffic lights stop cars so that pedestrians can cross. A contraction of “PEdestrian LIght CONtrolled crossing.” Yes, I know that would be “pelicon.” People were stupid back then.

Meaning of full stop

full stop means: n period. The little dot at the end of a sentence, not the part of the menstrual cycle. Brits also use full stop for emphasis the same way that Americans use “period”: And I says to him, I’m not putting up with this any more, full stop.

Meaning of colleague

colleague means: n co-worker. In here because Brits do not use the term “co-worker.” Of no relevance at all is the fact that Brits also do not refer to the hosts of television news programmes as “anchors,” which caused my British boss some confusion when he became convinced that the CNN presenter had handed over to her “co-wanker.”

Meaning of pit stop

pit stop means: Stop for a bathroom. Let's make a pit stop at the next rest area.

Meaning of shop

shop means: n store. What Americans call “shops,” the Brits call “workshops” or “garages.”

Meaning of 'book' Or 'booking'

'book' Or 'booking' means: to run quickly, usually away from something. (ie The cops were after hi so he was booking down the street.)

Meaning of jumper

jumper means: n sweater. What Americans call a “jumper” (a set of overalls with a skirt instead of trousers), Brits would call a “pinafore.”

Meaning of bollard

bollard means: n small concrete or metal post generally used to stop cars from driving into certain places. While used only in a nautical context in the U.S., it is accepted universally in the U.K. When not on boats, Americans call them “pylons,” which to Brits are the giant metal structures used to hold up national grid electricity wires.

Meaning of Patience

Patience means: n Solitaire. A card game played alone. I once wrote that the Brits would no doubt start calling it “solitaire” eventually, and some bastard half my age wrote to me to tell me that “mainly older people” call it “patience.” So, sadly, I have to add here that this term is used by “mainly older people.” This reminds me of the time my mother came home in tears when a boy scout had tried to help her across the road. Rather oddly, we Brits also call another game “Solitaire.” Just go and look it up like a man.

Meaning of bum

bum means: 1 n posterior; pretty much the British equivalent of “butt.” 2 v mooch: Mind if I bum a ride home? or perhaps more amusingly: Can I bum a fag? What the Americans call “bums” Brits call “tramps.”

Meaning of hood

hood means: n convertible top. The part of a convertible car that, well, converts. This only serves to complicate the bonnet/boot confusion. Brits do not use “hood” as an abbreviation of “neighbourhood,” unless they are trying to act like American rap stars. Brits are not very good at that, although it doesn’t stop them trying.

Meaning of roundabout

roundabout means: n traffic circle; rotary. The device put into the road as a snare for learner drivers and foreigners. Everyone has to drive around in a circle until they see their selected exit road, at which point they must fight through the other traffic on the roundabout in a valiant attempt to leave it. Roundabouts do exist in the U.S. (predominantly in Massachusetts) but in the U.K. they’re all over the place - there is no such thing as a four-way-stop.

Meaning of fanny

fanny means: n female genitalia. This is another word which could leave you abroad and in dire straits. In the U.S., your fanny is your posterior and a “fanny pack” is what Brits decided to call a “bum bag” instead. There’s a neoprene belt sold in the U.S. that is designed to stop snow from entering your ski jacket during a fall. It is marketed under the name “Fanny Flaps.” It is not for sale in the U.K.

Meaning of dado

dado means: n decorative wooden track that some people think is nice to have around walls at the height of a chair back. Those people are blithering morons. Brits also know such a thing as a “dado rail;” Americans call it “wainscoating” or “chair rail.” It is, perhaps fittingly, more popular in mobile homes than in normal homes. To confuse things slightly, a dado to an American carpenter is a slot in a piece of wood (usually for fitting shelves or cabinets) which Brits call a “rebate” or “housing.”

Meaning of vest

vest means: n undershirt. The item of clothing worn under your shirt. What Americans call a “vest,” Brits call a “waistcoat.”

Meaning of Jock

Jock means: n Scottish person. Similar to the use of “Paddy” to mean an Irish person. The people that Americans call “Jocks”, Brits would call “rugger buggers”.

Meaning of Implore

Implore means: To call upon, or for, in supplication; to beseech; to prey to, or for, earnestly; to petition with urency; to entreat; to beg; -- followed directly by the word expressing the thing sought, or the person from whom it is sought.

Meaning of Call

Call means: To state, or estimate, approximately or loosely; to characterize without strict regard to fact; as, they call the distance ten miles; he called it a full day's work.

Meaning of Cafe

Cafe means: A coffeehouse; a restaurant; also, a room in a hotel or restaurant where coffee and liquors are served.

Meaning of Booking clerk

Booking clerk means: A clerk who registers passengers, baggage, etc., for conveyance, as by railway or steamship, or who sells passage tickets at a booking office.

Meaning of Warm

Warm means: In children's games, being near the object sought for; hence, being close to the discovery of some person, thing, or fact concealed.

Meaning of Farfetched

Farfetched means: Studiously sought; not easily or naturally deduced or introduced; forced; strained.

Meaning of Call

Call means: To utter in a loud or distinct voice; -- often with off; as, to call, or call off, the items of an account; to call the roll of a military company.

Meaning of Call

Call means: To make a brief visit; also, to stop at some place designated, as for orders.

Meaning of Hollo

Hollo means: Ho there; stop; attend; hence, a loud cry or a call to attract attention; a halloo.

Meaning of Mesethmoid

Mesethmoid means: The median vertical plate, or median element, of the ethmoid bone.

Meaning of Grassy

Grassy means: Covered with grass; abounding with grass; as, a grassy lawn.

Meaning of Stop-over

Stop-over means: Permitting one to stop over; as, a stop-over check or ticket. See To stop over, under Stop, v. i.

Meaning of Median

Median means: Situated in the middle; lying in a plane dividing a bilateral animal into right and left halves; -- said of unpaired organs and parts; as, median coverts.

Meaning of Collisive

Collisive means: Colliding; clashing.

Meaning of Monger

Monger means: To deal in; to make merchandise of; to traffic in; -- used chiefly of discreditable traffic.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Amylobacter

Amylobacter means: A microorganism (Bacillus amylobacter) which develops in vegetable tissue during putrefaction.

Meaning of Approbator

Approbator means: One who approves.

Meaning of Astrogeny

Astrogeny means: The creation or evolution of the stars or the heavens.

Meaning of Nereides

Nereides means: of Nereid

Meaning of Responsible

Responsible means: Involving responsibility; involving a degree of accountability on the part of the person concerned; as, a responsible office.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of take the mickey

take the mickey means: to mock

Meaning of GTH

GTH means: Go To Hell

Meaning of guff

guff means: Bluster, threats. Do what you want to do; don't take any guff from Frankie.

Meaning of huffy

huffy means: Arrogant, rude. I will do it soon so please don't get huffy.

Tags: Slang Meaning of n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might.. The slang definition of n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might.? Please, add a definition of n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might. if you did not find one from a search of n median. Far from being a sought-after restaurant booking, this is in fact what Brits call the grassy area in the centre of a motorway which is there to stop you colliding with oncoming traffic quite as easily as you might..

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