Slang meaning of scarper

scarper means: v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge.

What is the slang meaning/definition of scarper ?

scarper means: v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge.

Slang definition of scarper

scarper means: v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge.

More meanings / definitions of v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge. or words, sentences containing v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge.?

World (n.): In a more restricted sense, that part of the earth and its concerns which is known to any one, or contemplated by any one; a division of the globe, or of its inhabitants; human affairs as seen from a certain position, or from a given point of view; also, state of existence; scene of life and action; as, the Old World; the New World; the religious world; the Catholic world; the upper world; the future world; the heathen world.

Natural (a.): Having to do with existing system to things; dealing with, or derived from, the creation, or the world of matter and mind, as known by man; within the scope of human reason or experience; not supernatural; as, a natural law; natural science; history, theology.

Newfoundland (n.): An island on the coast of British North America, famed for the fishing grounds in its vicinity.

Mufti (n.): Citizen's dress when worn by a naval or military officer; -- a term derived from the British service in India.

View (n.): That which is seen or beheld; sight presented to the natural or intellectual eye; scene; prospect; as, the view from a window.

Spray (v. t.): To throw spray upon; to treat with a liquid in the form of spray; as, to spray a wound, or a surgical instrument, with carbolic acid.

Spray (v. t.): A jet of fine medicated vapor, used either as an application to a diseased part or to charge the air of a room with a disinfectant or a deodorizer.

Continent (a.): One of the grand divisions of land on the globe; the main land; specifically (Phys. Geog.), a large body of land differing from an island, not merely in its size, but in its structure, which is that of a large basin bordered by mountain chains; as, the continent of North America.

Subject (n.): The incident, scene, figure, group, etc., which it is the aim of the artist to represent.

Extra (n.): Something in addition to what is due, expected, or customary; something in addition to the regular charge or compensation, or for which an additional charge is made; as, at European hotels lights are extras.

Extra (a.): Beyond what is due, usual, expected, or necessary; additional; supernumerary; also, extraordinarily good; superior; as, extra work; extra pay.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Equinoctial (a.): Pertaining to the time when the sun enters the equinoctial points; as, an equinoctial gale or storm, that is, one happening at or near the time of the equinox, in any part of the world.

Storeship (n.): A vessel used to carry naval stores for a fleet, garrison, or the like.

Night (n.): That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.

Overtime (n.): Time beyond, or in excess of, a limit; esp., extra working time.

Crees (n. pl.): An Algonquin tribe of Indians, inhabiting a large part of British America east of the Rocky Mountains and south of Hudson's Bay.

Shot-free (a.): Free from charge or expense; hence, unpunished; scot-free.

Watershed (n.): The line of division between two adjacent rivers or lakes with respect to the flow of water by natural channels into them; the natural boundary of a basin.

Sort (n.): A kind or species; any number or collection of individual persons or things characterized by the same or like qualities; a class or order; as, a sort of men; a sort of horses; a sort of trees; a sort of poems.

Inch (n.): An island; -- often used in the names of small islands off the coast of Scotland, as in Inchcolm, Inchkeith, etc.

Britisher (n.): An Englishman; a subject or inhabitant of Great Britain, esp. one in the British military or naval service.

Admiral (n.): A naval officer of the highest rank; a naval officer of high rank, of which there are different grades. The chief gradations in rank are admiral, vice admiral, and rear admiral. The admiral is the commander in chief of a fleet or of fleets.

Rich (superl.): Abounding in humor; exciting amusement; entertaining; as, the scene was a rich one; a rich incident or character.

Paned (a.): Having panes; provided with panes; also, having openings; as, a paned window; paned window sash.

Bunker (n.): A sort of chest or box, as in a window, the lid of which serves for a seat.

Cockade (n.): A badge, usually in the form of a rosette, or knot, and generally worn upon the hat; -- used as an indication of military or naval service, or party allegiance, and in England as a part of the livery to indicate that the wearer is the servant of a military or naval officer.

Fleet (v. i.): A number of vessels in company, especially war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc.

Paint (v. t.): To cover with coloring matter; to apply paint to; as, to paint a house, a signboard, etc.

Spray (n.): A collective body of small branches; as, the tree has a beautiful spray.

Like to add another meaning or definition of v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge.

Meaning of scarper

scarper means: v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge.

Meaning of scarper

scarper means: Verb. Go, often hurriedly, to escape. Abb. rhyming slang from Scapa Flow. E.g."He grabbed her handbag and scarpered before anyone had the chance to tackle him."

Meaning of SCOTLAND

SCOTLAND means: Scotland (shortened from Scotland the brave) is London Cockney rhyming slang for shave.

Meaning of cack-handed

cack-handed means: clumsy; ineptly executed. Likely derived from a time when the left hand was used for cleaning one’s posterior after movements, and the right hand reserved for anything else. Therefore anything executed with the left hand is perhaps sub-standard. Almost all scatological etymologies are historically false, but they’re more amusing than the polite ones. The sad truth of life is that more of our language derived from the Viking term for “baking tray” than some sort of acronym which spelled “FUCK.”

Meaning of POP A WINDOW

POP A WINDOW means: Pop a window is criminal slang for to break a window as part of a 'smash and grab' raid.

Meaning of Harbour

Harbour means: A harbour, or haven, is a place where ships may shelter from the weather or are stored. Harbours can be man-made or natural.

Meaning of SCAPA FLOW

SCAPA FLOW means: Scapa flow is London Cockney rhyming slang for go, make a quick exit.

Meaning of SCOTLAND THE BRAVE

SCOTLAND THE BRAVE means: Scotland the brave is London Cockney rhyming slang for shave.

Meaning of CHANNEL FLEET

CHANNEL FLEET means: Channel fleet was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a street.

Meaning of HARBOUR LIGHT

HARBOUR LIGHT means: Harbour light is London Cockney rhyming slang for correct (right).

Meaning of DOVER HARBOUR

DOVER HARBOUR means: Dover harbour is London Cockney rhyming slang for barber.

Meaning of Shore Leave

Shore Leave means: Free time given to officers and crew of a naval vessel when they are off duty and allowed to disembark and spend time on land.

Meaning of berk

berk means: An idiot, someone who does something "stupid", or just an annoying or unpleasant person. Actually this word is derived from the Cockney rhyming slang "Berkshire Hunt" = cunt. And in the words of one Michael Caine, "Not a lot of people know that!"... even though it's now in common use all round the UK!!

Meaning of ONE FOR HIS NOB

ONE FOR HIS NOB means: One for his nob is British slang for an extra payment, a tip.One for his nob was London Cockney rhyming slang for a shilling (bob).

Meaning of North Sea (Mar del Norte) --)

North Sea (Mar del Norte) --) means: While today this often refers to the ocean East of Scotland and north of Denmark. In the Golden Age it could also refer to the North Atlantic Ocean, especially that portion between the Azores and the Caribbean Sea.

Meaning of huff

huff means: to inhale ordinary household products to get high. Users huff directly from the container or from inhalant-soaked rags, socks, or rolls of toilet paper. Inhalants include model airplane glue, nail polish remover, cleaning fluids, hair spray, gasoline, the propellant in aerosol whipped cream, spray paint, fabric protector, air conditioner fluid (freon), cooking spray and correction fluid.

Meaning of CHARGE

CHARGE means: Charge is slang for a thrill.Charge is British slang for marijuana, hashish.Charge is American slang for a heroin injection.

Meaning of Destroyer escort

Destroyer escort means: A smaller, lightly armed warship built in large numbers during World War II. Employed primarily for anti-submarine warfare, but also provided some protection against aircraft and smaller surface ships.

Meaning of bud

bud means: Dreadful, bad. e.g. "That is so bud" as in something that is really crap. Very big in the eighties in Swindon, England, (ed: if you've ever been to Swindon you'll know why I left that comment in!). Possibly derived from 'bad'. Mark elaborated on this somewhat with the following: The word did originate in Swindow around 1978 by kids from the Haydon Wick/Greenmeadow area of North Swindon. It actually derives from 'bod' as in the children's tv programme, Bod. Example: 'You're fucking bod'. This eventually metamorphosed into 'bud'. This was peculiar to my age group at the time, ages from 11 - 14. Other examples of usage are: 'He's a bud kid'; 'this is so fucking bud'; 'what a bud place' and 'I hate school, it's so bud'. WHen Mark was 25, he was amazed to hear kids as young a 9, saying it. As far as he knows, people still use it in the Haydon Wick/Greenmeadow/Moredon/Rodbourne Cheney areas - aging from schoolchildren to grown ups of 40. It has permeated out to other areas of Swindon as well.

Meaning of Loose lips sink ships

Loose lips sink ships means: This term originated during World War II by the US military and was meant as a reminder that classified information was never to be discussed as it posed unnecessary risks for naval ships.

Meaning of World

World means: In a more restricted sense, that part of the earth and its concerns which is known to any one, or contemplated by any one; a division of the globe, or of its inhabitants; human affairs as seen from a certain position, or from a given point of view; also, state of existence; scene of life and action; as, the Old World; the New World; the religious world; the Catholic world; the upper world; the future world; the heathen world.

Meaning of Natural

Natural means: Having to do with existing system to things; dealing with, or derived from, the creation, or the world of matter and mind, as known by man; within the scope of human reason or experience; not supernatural; as, a natural law; natural science; history, theology.

Meaning of Newfoundland

Newfoundland means: An island on the coast of British North America, famed for the fishing grounds in its vicinity.

Meaning of Mufti

Mufti means: Citizen's dress when worn by a naval or military officer; -- a term derived from the British service in India.

Meaning of View

View means: That which is seen or beheld; sight presented to the natural or intellectual eye; scene; prospect; as, the view from a window.

Meaning of Spray

Spray means: To throw spray upon; to treat with a liquid in the form of spray; as, to spray a wound, or a surgical instrument, with carbolic acid.

Meaning of Spray

Spray means: A jet of fine medicated vapor, used either as an application to a diseased part or to charge the air of a room with a disinfectant or a deodorizer.

Meaning of Continent

Continent means: One of the grand divisions of land on the globe; the main land; specifically (Phys. Geog.), a large body of land differing from an island, not merely in its size, but in its structure, which is that of a large basin bordered by mountain chains; as, the continent of North America.

Meaning of Subject

Subject means: The incident, scene, figure, group, etc., which it is the aim of the artist to represent.

Meaning of Extra

Extra means: Something in addition to what is due, expected, or customary; something in addition to the regular charge or compensation, or for which an additional charge is made; as, at European hotels lights are extras.

Meaning of Extra

Extra means: Beyond what is due, usual, expected, or necessary; additional; supernumerary; also, extraordinarily good; superior; as, extra work; extra pay.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Equinoctial

Equinoctial means: Pertaining to the time when the sun enters the equinoctial points; as, an equinoctial gale or storm, that is, one happening at or near the time of the equinox, in any part of the world.

Meaning of Storeship

Storeship means: A vessel used to carry naval stores for a fleet, garrison, or the like.

Meaning of Night

Night means: That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Beggar's lice

Beggar's lice means: The prickly fruit or seed of certain plants (as some species of Echinospermum and Cynoglossum) which cling to the clothing of those who brush by them.

Meaning of Disproportion

Disproportion means: To make unsuitable in quantity, form, or fitness to an end; to violate symmetry in; to mismatch; to join unfitly.

Meaning of Engarland

Engarland means: To encircle with a garland, or with garlands.

Meaning of Minikin

Minikin means: Small; diminutive.

Meaning of Romantic

Romantic means: Of or pertaining to romance; involving or resembling romance; hence, fanciful; marvelous; extravagant; unreal; as, a romantic tale; a romantic notion; a romantic undertaking.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of LOOKZEE

LOOKZEE means: Lookzee is Dorset slang for look and understand.

Meaning of ROAD KID

ROAD KID means: Road kid is slang for a young tramp.

Meaning of Engaged

Engaged means: - When you ring someone and they are already on the phone you will get the engaged tone. In other words, they will be engaged. You would say you get the busy signal or the line is busy.

Meaning of Mysteries

Mysteries means: Sausages, called that because many didn't know what they were made of.

Tags: Slang Meaning of v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge.. The slang definition of v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge.? Please, add a definition of v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge. if you did not find one from a search of v run away. Usually from the scene of some sort of unpleasant incident in which you were a part: I saw some kids out the window writing all over my car in spray paint but by the time I got there they’d scarpered. It may be derived from the Cockney rhyming slang “Scappa Flow” / “go.” Scappa Flow is a large natural harbour on an island north of Scotland where the British naval fleet was kept during World War One. All this extra information provided free of charge..

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