Slang meaning of Tube

Tube means: n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate.

What is the slang meaning/definition of Tube ?

Tube means: n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate.

Slang definition of Tube

Tube means: n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate.

More meanings / definitions of n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate. or words, sentences containing n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate.?

Call (v. t.): To utter in a loud or distinct voice; -- often with off; as, to call, or call off, the items of an account; to call the roll of a military company.

Call (n.): The act of calling; -- usually with the voice, but often otherwise, as by signs, the sound of some instrument, or by writing; a summons; an entreaty; an invitation; as, a call for help; the bugle's call.

Invocation (n.): A call or summons; especially, a judicial call, demand, or order; as, the invocation of papers or evidence into court.

Reclaim (v. t.): To call back, as a hawk to the wrist in falconry, by a certain customary call.

Reclaim (v. t.): To call back from flight or disorderly action; to call to, for the purpose of subduing or quieting.

Hem (n.): An utterance or sound of the voice, hem or hm, often indicative of hesitation or doubt, sometimes used to call attention.

Hunt's-up (n.): A tune played on the horn very early in the morning to call out the hunters; hence, any arousing sound or call.

Call (n.): A short visit; as, to make a call on a neighbor; also, the daily coming of a tradesman to solicit orders.

Challenge (n.): To call to a contest of any kind; to call to answer; to defy.

Call (v. t.): To command or request to come or be present; to summon; as, to call a servant.

Cry (v. i.): To make a loud call or cry; to call or exclaim vehemently or earnestly; to shout; to vociferate; to proclaim; to pray; to implore.

Call (v. t.): To invite or command to meet; to convoke; -- often with together; as, the President called Congress together; to appoint and summon; as, to call a meeting of the Board of Aldermen.

Call (v. t.): To state, or estimate, approximately or loosely; to characterize without strict regard to fact; as, they call the distance ten miles; he called it a full day's work.

Cluck (v. t.): To call together, or call to follow, as a hen does her chickens.

Call (v. t.): To summon to the discharge of a particular duty; to designate for an office, or employment, especially of a religious character; -- often used of a divine summons; as, to be called to the ministry; sometimes, to invite; as, to call a minister to be the pastor of a church.

Appeal (v. t.): A call upon a person or an authority for proof or decision, in one's favor; reference to another as witness; a call for help or a favor; entreaty.

Londonism (n.): A characteristic of Londoners; a mode of speaking peculiar to London.

Appeal (v. t.): To call upon another to decide a question controverted, to corroborate a statement, to vindicate one's rights, etc.; as, I appeal to all mankind for the truth of what is alleged. Hence: To call on one for aid; to make earnest request.

Call (n.): The cry of a bird; also a noise or cry in imitation of a bird; or a pipe to call birds by imitating their note or cry.

Array (n.): To set in order, as a jury, for the trial of a cause; that is, to call them man by man.

Provoke (v. t.): To call forth; to call into being or action; esp., to incense to action, a faculty or passion, as love, hate, or ambition; hence, commonly, to incite, as a person, to action by a challenge, by taunts, or by defiance; to exasperate; to irritate; to offend intolerably; to cause to retaliate.

Nudge (v. t.): To touch gently, as with the elbow, in order to call attention or convey intimation.

Re- (): A prefix signifying back, against, again, anew; as, recline, to lean back; recall, to call back; recede; remove; reclaim, to call out against; repugn, to fight against; recognition, a knowing again; rejoin, to join again; reiterate; reassure. Combinations containing the prefix re- are readily formed, and are for the most part of obvious signification.

Calling (n.): A naming, or inviting; a reading over or reciting in order, or a call of names with a view to obtaining an answer, as in legislative bodies.

Deathwatch (n.): A small beetle (Anobium tessellatum and other allied species). By forcibly striking its head against woodwork it makes a ticking sound, which is a call of the sexes to each other, but has been imagined by superstitious people to presage death.

Demand (v. t.): To ask or call for with authority; to claim or seek from, as by authority or right; to claim, as something due; to call for urgently or peremptorily; as, to demand a debt; to demand obedience.

Inspired (a.): Moved or animated by, or as by, a supernatural influence; affected by divine inspiration; as, the inspired prophets; the inspired writers.

Longitudinal (n.): A railway sleeper lying parallel with the rail.

Drunk (a.): Intoxicated with, or as with, strong drink; inebriated; drunken; -- never used attributively, but always predicatively; as, the man is drunk (not, a drunk man).

Vying (): a. & n. from Vie. W () the twenty-third letter of the English alphabet, is usually a consonant, but sometimes it is a vowel, forming the second element of certain diphthongs, as in few, how. It takes its written form and its name from the repetition of a V, this being the original form of the Roman capital letter which we call U. Etymologically it is most related to v and u. See V, and U. Some of the uneducated classes in England, especially in London, confuse w and v, substituting the one for the other, as weal for veal, and veal for weal; wine for vine, and vine for wine, etc. See Guide to Pronunciation, // 266-268.

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Like to add another meaning or definition of n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate.?

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Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate.

Meaning of Tube

Tube means: n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate.

Meaning of subway

subway means: n underground pedestrian walkway. Built to enable you to cross the road safely, urinate or inject heroin. Brits do not call the London underground train system the “subway.” They call it the “underground.”

Meaning of dado

dado means: n decorative wooden track that some people think is nice to have around walls at the height of a chair back. Those people are blithering morons. Brits also know such a thing as a “dado rail;” Americans call it “wainscoating” or “chair rail.” It is, perhaps fittingly, more popular in mobile homes than in normal homes. To confuse things slightly, a dado to an American carpenter is a slot in a piece of wood (usually for fitting shelves or cabinets) which Brits call a “rebate” or “housing.”

Meaning of bum

bum means: 1 n posterior; pretty much the British equivalent of “butt.” 2 v mooch: Mind if I bum a ride home? or perhaps more amusingly: Can I bum a fag? What the Americans call “bums” Brits call “tramps.”

Meaning of Patience

Patience means: n Solitaire. A card game played alone. I once wrote that the Brits would no doubt start calling it “solitaire” eventually, and some bastard half my age wrote to me to tell me that “mainly older people” call it “patience.” So, sadly, I have to add here that this term is used by “mainly older people.” This reminds me of the time my mother came home in tears when a boy scout had tried to help her across the road. Rather oddly, we Brits also call another game “Solitaire.” Just go and look it up like a man.

Meaning of jam

jam means: n jelly. Sort of. What Americans call “jelly” (fruit preserve without fruity-bits in it), Brits still call jam. What Americans call “jello,” Brits call “jelly.” Oh yes, and what Americans call “jam” is still also called jam in the U.K. I think that’s the jams pretty much covered.

Meaning of queue

queue means: n, v, pron. “cue” line. This doesn’t really help the definition at all, as a line could be any number of things. A pencil line? A railway line? A line of Charlie? A line dancer? As a result of this potentially dangerous confusion, a word was developed by some British word-scientists to separate this particular line from all the others. A queue is a line of people. To queue is to be one of those queuing in the queue. The word means “tail” in French, and is used in the same context. Americans do in fact use the word, but only in the “you’re third in the queue” type telephone call waiting systems.

Meaning of Jock

Jock means: n Scottish person. Similar to the use of “Paddy” to mean an Irish person. The people that Americans call “Jocks”, Brits would call “rugger buggers”.

Meaning of shop

shop means: n store. What Americans call “shops,” the Brits call “workshops” or “garages.”

Meaning of Toe-Rag

Toe-Rag means: Fag (cigarette). Lend us a sprarsy - I wanna get some toe-rags. Toe-rags refer to the rags people used to wrap around their feet when they didn't have shoes... we used to call our socks toe-rags which is probably the same origin. He also says his old dad used to call some people a toe-rag and suspects it might have been an insult (reference to fag = queer). Toe rag couls also refer to a small time petty thief, in his words "the sort of dirty little toe rag who would live next door and break into your house and nick the Christmas presents", "term is commonly used, at least in Scotland, meaning just a bit stronger than "rascal" and probably spelled without the e: 'You little torag.' I always thought it did come from terms used to refer to travelling people.

Meaning of jumper

jumper means: n sweater. What Americans call a “jumper” (a set of overalls with a skirt instead of trousers), Brits would call a “pinafore.”

Meaning of autumn

autumn means: n season between summer and winter. Americans call it “fall.” Americans, of course, also call it “autumn” which might have you wondering why it’s in here at all. Well, my furry friend, it is in here because Brits never call it “fall.” Think of this entry not so much as “autumn,” but more as “not fall.”

Meaning of pavement

pavement means: n sidewalk. Brits call the part that cars drive on “Tarmac.” I wonder how many holidaymakers have been run over as a result of this confusion. Well, probably none really. I digress. Historically, “sidewalk” is in fact an old, now-unused British English word meaning exactly what the Americans take it to mean.

Meaning of vest

vest means: n undershirt. The item of clothing worn under your shirt. What Americans call a “vest,” Brits call a “waistcoat.”

Meaning of underground

underground means: n subway (specifically underground railway): There’s an underground station two minutes from my house.

Meaning of squash

squash means: n cordial; diluted fruit drink. It’s a little outdated - you’d be more likely to find your grandmother offering you “lemon squash” than you would your children. The vegetable that Americans call a “squash,” Brits call a “marrow.”

Meaning of pants

pants means: 1 n underpants. What Americans call “pants,” Brits call “trousers.” 2 interj crap. A general derogatory word: We went to see Andy playing in his band but to be honest they were pants.

Meaning of suspenders

suspenders means: n garters. The things used by women to hold up their stockings. They are not used by men to hold up their trousers (Brits call those devices “braces”) or their socks (they call those things, umm, “garters”).

Meaning of trolley

trolley means: n 1 shopping cart. The device in which you put your shopping while going around the supermarket. 2 refreshment cart, as seen on trains, planes, in offices and such like. What Americans call “trolleys,” the Brits call “trams.”

Meaning of Duck

Duck means: In and around Leeds you will find older people might call you "duck" in the same way that they might call you "love" or "dear" in other places. Usually pronounced more like "dook", which rhymes with "book".

Meaning of Call

Call means: To utter in a loud or distinct voice; -- often with off; as, to call, or call off, the items of an account; to call the roll of a military company.

Meaning of Call

Call means: The act of calling; -- usually with the voice, but often otherwise, as by signs, the sound of some instrument, or by writing; a summons; an entreaty; an invitation; as, a call for help; the bugle's call.

Meaning of Invocation

Invocation means: A call or summons; especially, a judicial call, demand, or order; as, the invocation of papers or evidence into court.

Meaning of Reclaim

Reclaim means: To call back, as a hawk to the wrist in falconry, by a certain customary call.

Meaning of Reclaim

Reclaim means: To call back from flight or disorderly action; to call to, for the purpose of subduing or quieting.

Meaning of Hem

Hem means: An utterance or sound of the voice, hem or hm, often indicative of hesitation or doubt, sometimes used to call attention.

Meaning of Hunt's-up

Hunt's-up means: A tune played on the horn very early in the morning to call out the hunters; hence, any arousing sound or call.

Meaning of Call

Call means: A short visit; as, to make a call on a neighbor; also, the daily coming of a tradesman to solicit orders.

Meaning of Challenge

Challenge means: To call to a contest of any kind; to call to answer; to defy.

Meaning of Call

Call means: To command or request to come or be present; to summon; as, to call a servant.

Meaning of Cry

Cry means: To make a loud call or cry; to call or exclaim vehemently or earnestly; to shout; to vociferate; to proclaim; to pray; to implore.

Meaning of Call

Call means: To invite or command to meet; to convoke; -- often with together; as, the President called Congress together; to appoint and summon; as, to call a meeting of the Board of Aldermen.

Meaning of Call

Call means: To state, or estimate, approximately or loosely; to characterize without strict regard to fact; as, they call the distance ten miles; he called it a full day's work.

Meaning of Cluck

Cluck means: To call together, or call to follow, as a hen does her chickens.

Meaning of Call

Call means: To summon to the discharge of a particular duty; to designate for an office, or employment, especially of a religious character; -- often used of a divine summons; as, to be called to the ministry; sometimes, to invite; as, to call a minister to be the pastor of a church.

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Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Cancrinite

Cancrinite means: A mineral occurring in hexagonal crystals, also massive, generally of a yellow color, containing silica, alumina, lime, soda, and carbon dioxide.

Meaning of Gummosity

Gummosity means: Gumminess; a viscous or adhesive quality or nature.

Meaning of Puddle

Puddle means: To make impervious to liquids by means of puddle; to apply puddle to.

Meaning of Thionaphthene

Thionaphthene means: A double benzene and thiophene nucleus, C8H6S, analogous to naphthalene, and like it the base of a large series of derivatives.

Meaning of Woodstone

Woodstone means: A striped variety of hornstone, resembling wood in appearance.

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Slang words and meanings

Meaning of LOCKEROOM

LOCKEROOM means: Lockeroom is slang for amyl nitrate (or any associated inhalant drug).

Meaning of tard

tard means: short for "retard", an idiot

Meaning of Polari

Polari means: To urinate (male only)

Meaning of Blue Gums

Blue Gums means: Old myth that if one were bitten by a nigger with blue gums, they would die.

Meaning of Srew

Srew means:   Skeleton Key

Tags: Slang Meaning of n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate.. The slang definition of n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate.? Please, add a definition of n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate. if you did not find one from a search of n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate..

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