Slang meaning of 2/6 heave

2/6 heave means: The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do.

What is the slang meaning/definition of 2/6 heave ?

2/6 heave means: The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do.

Slang definition of 2/6 heave

2/6 heave means: The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do.

Trending & Popular Articles
 Professional liability insurance (PLI)(commonly known as errors & omissions (E&O) in the US) is a type of liability insurance that helps protect...

More meanings / definitions of The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do. or words, sentences containing The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do.?

Heave (v. t.): To throw; to cast; -- obsolete, provincial, or colloquial, except in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the lead; to heave the log.

Heave (v. t.): To raise or force from the breast; to utter with effort; as, to heave a sigh.

Heave (v. t.): To force from, or into, any position; to cause to move; also, to throw off; -- mostly used in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the ship ahead.

Heave (v. i.): To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult.

Heaving (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Heave

Hoven (): of Heave

Heaved (p. p.): of Heave

Hove (): of Heave

Hove (): of Heave

Heaved (imp.): of Heave

Hove (): imp. & p. p. of Heave.

Gag (v. t.): To cause to heave with nausea.

Hoven (): p. p. of Heave.

Underheave (v. i.): To heave or lift from below.

Embillow (v. i.): To swell or heave like a ///// of the sea.

Gag (v. i.): To heave with nausea; to retch.

Keeve (v. t.): To heave; to tilt, as a cart.

Heft (v. t.): To heave up; to raise aloft.

Homocategoric (a.): Belonging to the same category of individuality; -- a morphological term applied to organisms so related.

Wamble (v. i.): To heave; to be disturbed by nausea; -- said of the stomach.

Heave (v. t.): To cause to swell or rise, as the breast or bosom.

Keck (v. i.): To heave or to retch, as in an effort to vomit.

Upheave (v. t.): To heave or lift up from beneath; to raise.

Heave (n.): An effort to raise something, as a weight, or one's self, or to move something heavy.

Heave (v. i.): To make an effort to vomit; to retch; to vomit.

Heave (v. i.): To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound.

Draw (v. t.): To take into the lungs; to inhale; to inspire; hence, also, to utter or produce by an inhalation; to heave.

Clarendon (n.): A style of type having a narrow and heave face. It is made in all sizes.

Dimension (n.): A literal factor, as numbered in characterizing a term. The term dimensions forms with the cardinal numbers a phrase equivalent to degree with the ordinal; thus, a2b2c is a term of five dimensions, or of the fifth degree.

Heave (n.): An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, and the like.

Like to add another meaning or definition of The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do.

Meaning of 2/6 heave

2/6 heave means: The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do.

Meaning of Two Six Heave

Two Six Heave means: Term of encouragement meaning to pull or lift with full force. Originally, a term meant for two members of a gun crew (numbers two and six) who would run out the gun by pulling on the ropes that secured it in place.

Meaning of Heave Out

Heave Out means: to move in a certain direction: Heave the capstan around! Heave up the anchor!

Meaning of Headway

Headway means: The forward motion of a boat through the water. Opposite of sternway. Heave : (1) To throw, as to heave a line ashore. (2) An upward pull on a line; to lift (3) The rise and fall of a vessel in a seaway.

Meaning of heave-ho

heave-ho means: An ejection, throwing out physically. Frothingschloss became so rambunctious in the bar that they gave him the old heave-ho.

Meaning of OLD HEAVE HO

OLD HEAVE HO means: Old heave ho is British slang for dismissal, rejection.

Meaning of HEAVE

HEAVE means: Heave is American slang for to vomit.

Meaning of Heave In Sight

Heave In Sight means: To come in sight, to appear. A nautical phrase that originated with approaching vessels which appeared to raise or heave itself above the horizon.

Meaning of Bowse

Bowse means: To pull downward on a rope or fall in order to provide more tautness. Heave means an upward pull and Haul means a horizontal pull.

Meaning of Not Me Chief, I'm Comm School

Not Me Chief, I'm Comm School means: At recruit school at HMCS/CFB Cornwallis, all new entries were required to double everywhere on base. Anyone not moving at double time would be admonished. A common expression used at the time was "Not me Chief, I'm Comm School." This term has carried forward through the years and is often used by someone that feels they should be exempt from a particular duty or tasking.

Meaning of Haul

Haul means: To pull in or heave on a line by hand; to pull.

Meaning of tuck in

tuck in means: v eat enthusiastically; dig in: Well, come on, tuck in before it gets cold! This is probably related to the term “tuck shop”, which similarly uses the word “tuck”. Also it might not be related at all.

Meaning of Heave In

Heave In means: The order to haul in on a line, wire, or anchor chain.

Meaning of Smoko

Smoko means: A short break, rest or recess. Usually work related. The original term was derived from taking a few minutes rest to smoke a cigarette

Meaning of Trice Up

Trice Up means: (1) Hoist up or in and lash or secure with a small rope (2)"Heave out and trice up" meant to pull up the bottom-most rack in the compartment so sweepers could get to clean underneath it.(The order or action of tying up hammocks in the morning)

Meaning of Wren

Wren means: Historically, a female member of the WRCNS (Women's Royal Canadian Naval Service) which existed during WWII and continued post-war through to the 1960s. Originated in the Royal Navy where the term Women's Royal Naval Service (WRNS) was shortened to "Wren". The term carried over to the Canadian Navy, however it is out of regular use in today's RCN. Also known as "Jenny Wren".

Meaning of Heave To

Heave To means: to bring the ship to a standstill by setting the sails so as to counteract each other; to make her lie to.

Meaning of chavtacular

chavtacular means: Adj. Of 'chav', see above, or related them in some excessive way or major extent. Another chav related expression created during the chav obsessed early 2000s. Cf. 'chavtastic'.

Meaning of Weigh anchor

Weigh anchor means: Heave up an anchor in preparation for sailing (can be used for to leave port).

Meaning of 4/6 heave

4/6 heave means: See 2/6 heave

Meaning of Heave

Heave means: To throw; to cast; -- obsolete, provincial, or colloquial, except in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the lead; to heave the log.

Meaning of Heave

Heave means: To raise or force from the breast; to utter with effort; as, to heave a sigh.

Meaning of Heave

Heave means: To force from, or into, any position; to cause to move; also, to throw off; -- mostly used in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the ship ahead.

Meaning of Heave

Heave means: To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult.

Meaning of Heaving

Heaving means: of Heave

Meaning of Hoven

Hoven means: of Heave

Meaning of Heaved

Heaved means: of Heave

Meaning of Hove

Hove means: of Heave

Meaning of Hove

Hove means: of Heave

Meaning of Heaved

Heaved means: of Heave

Meaning of Hove

Hove means: imp. & p. p. of Heave.

Meaning of Gag

Gag means: To cause to heave with nausea.

Meaning of Hoven

Hoven means: p. p. of Heave.

Meaning of Underheave

Underheave means: To heave or lift from below.

Meaning of Embillow

Embillow means: To swell or heave like a ///// of the sea.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Awning

Awning means: That part of the poop deck which is continued forward beyond the bulkhead of the cabin.

Meaning of Beef

Beef means: An animal of the genus Bos, especially the common species, B. taurus, including the bull, cow, and ox, in their full grown state; esp., an ox or cow fattened for food.

Meaning of Gush

Gush means: To make a sentimental or untimely exhibition of affection; to display enthusiasm in a silly, demonstrative manner.

Meaning of Neurotome

Neurotome means: A neuromere.

Meaning of Osanne

Osanne means: Hosanna.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of WHITE BREAD

WHITE BREAD means: White bread is American slang for someone virtuous and dull.

Meaning of crumpet

crumpet means: Noun. Sexually desirable person. E.g."The club was bursting its walls with crumpet." {Informal}

Meaning of MOOC

MOOC means: Massive Open Online Course

Meaning of bull session

bull session means: An informal conversation. The boys got together at Raphael's for an all-night bull-session.

Meaning of get

get means: To understand, e.g. to 'get' a joke. (ed: when I was in school in Wales I heard a 'get' was the son of an Irish prostitute!)

Tags: Slang Meaning of The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do.. The slang definition of The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do.? Please, add a definition of The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do. if you did not find one from a search of The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do..

Copyrights © 2016 LingoMash. All Rights Reserved.