Slang meaning of dowdled

dowdled means: Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest.

What is the slang meaning/definition of dowdled ?

dowdled means: Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest.

Slang definition of dowdled

dowdled means: Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest.

More meanings / definitions of Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest. or words, sentences containing Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest.?

Ideographical (a.): Of or pertaining to an ideogram; representing ideas by symbols, independently of sounds; as, 9 represents not the word "nine," but the idea of the number itself.

Word (n.): The spoken sign of a conception or an idea; an articulate or vocal sound, or a combination of articulate and vocal sounds, uttered by the human voice, and by custom expressing an idea or ideas; a single component part of human speech or language; a constituent part of a sentence; a term; a vocable.

Solve (v. t.): To explain; to resolve; to unfold; to clear up (what is obscure or difficult to be understood); to work out to a result or conclusion; as, to solve a doubt; to solve difficulties; to solve a problem.

Mont de piete (): One of certain public pawnbroking establishments which originated in Italy in the 15th century, the object of which was to lend money at a low rate of interest to poor people in need; -- called also mount of piety. The institution has been adopted in other countries, as in Spain and France. See Lombard-house.

Nice (superl.): Pleasing; agreeable; gratifying; delightful; good; as, a nice party; a nice excursion; a nice person; a nice day; a nice sauce, etc.

Harquebuse (n.): A firearm with match holder, trigger, and tumbler, made in the second half of the 15th century. the barrel was about forty inches long. A form of the harquebus was subsequently called arquebus with matchlock.

Nice (superl.): Done or made with careful labor; suited to excite admiration on account of exactness; evidencing great skill; exact; fine; finished; as, nice proportions, nice workmanship, a nice application; exactly or fastidiously discriminated; requiring close discrimination; as, a nice point of law, a nice distinction in philosophy.

Falconet (n.): One of the smaller cannon used in the 15th century and later.

Nice (superl.): Foolish; silly; simple; ignorant; also, weak; effeminate.

Ideas (pl. ): of Idea

Own (a.): Belonging to; belonging exclusively or especially to; peculiar; -- most frequently following a possessive pronoun, as my, our, thy, your, his, her, its, their, in order to emphasize or intensify the idea of property, peculiar interest, or exclusive ownership; as, my own father; my own composition; my own idea; at my own price.

Sallet (n.): A light kind of helmet, with or without a visor, introduced during the 15th century.

Stammel (n.): A red dye, used in England in the 15th and 16th centuries.

Paracelsian (a.): Of, pertaining to, or in conformity with, the practice of Paracelsus, a Swiss physician of the 15th century.

Petronel (n.): A sort of hand cannon, or portable firearm, used in France in the 15th century.

Sikhs (n. pl.): A religious sect noted for warlike traits, founded in the Punjab at the end of the 15th century.

Utraquist (n.): One who receives the eucharist in both kinds; esp., one of a body of Hussites who in the 15th century fought for the right to do this. Called also Calixtines.

Minim (n.): One of an austere order of mendicant hermits of friars founded in the 15th century by St. Francis of Paola.

Usbeks (n. pl.): A Turkish tribe which about the close of the 15th century conquered, and settled in, that part of Asia now called Turkestan.

Flamboyant (a.): Characterized by waving or flamelike curves, as in the tracery of windows, etc.; -- said of the later (15th century) French Gothic style.

Espauliere (n.): A defense for the shoulder, composed of flexible overlapping plates of metal, used in the 15th century; -- the origin of the modern epaulette.

Doublet (a.): A close-fitting garment for men, covering the body from the neck to the waist or a little below. It was worn in Western Europe from the 15th to the 17th century.

Silly (n.): Proceeding from want of understanding or common judgment; characterized by weakness or folly; unwise; absurd; stupid; as, silly conduct; a silly question.

Trope (n.): The use of a word or expression in a different sense from that which properly belongs to it; the use of a word or expression as changed from the original signification to another, for the sake of giving life or emphasis to an idea; a figure of speech.

Anadiplosis (n.): A repetition of the last word or any prominent word in a sentence or clause, at the beginning of the next, with an adjunct idea; as, "He retained his virtues amidst all his misfortunes -- misfortunes which no prudence could foresee or prevent."

Annotation (n.): A note, added by way of comment, or explanation; -- usually in the plural; as, annotations on ancient authors, or on a word or a passage.

Cunabula (n. pl.): The extant copies of the first or earliest printed books, or of such as were printed in the 15th century.

Carving (n.): The whole body of decorative sculpture of any kind or epoch, or in any material; as, the Italian carving of the 15th century.

North (a.): Lying toward the north; situated at the north, or in a northern direction from the point of observation or reckoning; proceeding toward the north, or coming from the north.

Note (n.): A brief remark; a marginal comment or explanation; hence, an annotation on a text or author; a comment; a critical, explanatory, or illustrative observation.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest.

Meaning of dowdled

dowdled means: Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest.

Meaning of alvida

alvida means: Used when saying goodbye (ed: I had NO idea what it meant when adding it, but it sounded nice. Since then we've had lots of comment!) The first contributor wrote thusly: It would appear that this word for good-bye is a slang for the German 'auf wiedersehen'. Phonetically, it sounds like 'al vee der zane. Hence, 'alvida'.(ed: wasn't right of course, and then we had more comments??) On the other hand, Sameer (and Anil) wrote, "Alvida is a pure Urdu word which means goodbye. As mentioned on your page it may have some similarity with the german word but that would probably because of the fact that German and Hindi have same origin (Sanskrit) and Urdu is derived from Persian, Hindi and one more language. (ed: so there ya go Bumpuppy (who whinged about one of the previous definitions being in here!!) You live and learn! Yet another comment, this time from Pradeep: "Alvida is a commonly used word in India and it literally means goodbye. It is used in literature quite a lot and is becoming less frequently used word in day to day interaction."

Meaning of form

form means: Noun. 1. A bench. An expression from the north-west/north of England, becoming less frequently used. 2. A criminal record. {Informal}

Meaning of neishk

neishk means: Word to shout in frustration or when other words just don't seem to fit. Contributor said he and his friend use it a lot, and it sounded like a nice word so I threw it in.

Meaning of melvin

melvin means: Another contributor objects to the 'wedgie' definition and sent in the following: In my school described the action of grabbing someone's testicles and twisting (especially when performed by a girl to get revenge over some form of sexual harrasment). One girl, Kim, a couple of years above the contributor, was notorious for giving them, although he personally found her to be a very nice person. Used as "Watch out fer that Kim, she'll melvin yer!!".

Meaning of ladgin

ladgin means: Used to describe something quite unfashionable. i.e. 'Those shoes are ladgin!' and 'he's really ladgin'. Ginger people were often referred to as Ladginners. Got quite trendy in usage - so much so that when the contributor was in the the first year, the fifth years opened a tuck shop called Ladgin Chow. No idea where the term came from, but it has a faint 'chinese' air about it. (ed: Anyone got any ideas?)

Meaning of Bairn

Bairn means: Baby or young child. This word is especially popular in Scotland and the north east of England

Meaning of Port

Port means: Port wine was the drink of the ship’s officers. It is a sweet, fortified wine from the Douro Valley in the northern part of Portugal. Port has been made in Portugal since the mid 15th Century. Port became very popular in England after the Methuen Treaty of 1703, when merchants were permitted to import it at a low duty, while war with France deprived English wine drinkers of French wine.

Meaning of socco

socco means: Contributor says he first came across this word in a juvenile novel entitled "Go Saddle The Sea", by Joan Aiken. It was used by English schoolboys in the earlier part of this century in the same context as "crazy"; as in having a crush/infatuation. Illustration: "I'm quite socco over the new Maths teacher.". He doesn't know if this word is still in use, if it was ever in use at all, outside of that boarding school which might or might not have ever existed. (ed: don't call us and we won't call you - ok??)

Meaning of gormless

gormless means: Derogatory term for an individual of lesser intelligence. Often used in conjunction with the word 'pillock' as in 'Gormless Pillock'. Pillock being another word for a doofus. In Geordieland (North East of England) people say "That blowkie has ner gorm!". (ed: someone mailed in the definition for gorm - but I lost it!)

Meaning of bud

bud means: Dreadful, bad. e.g. "That is so bud" as in something that is really crap. Very big in the eighties in Swindon, England, (ed: if you've ever been to Swindon you'll know why I left that comment in!). Possibly derived from 'bad'. Mark elaborated on this somewhat with the following: The word did originate in Swindow around 1978 by kids from the Haydon Wick/Greenmeadow area of North Swindon. It actually derives from 'bod' as in the children's tv programme, Bod. Example: 'You're fucking bod'. This eventually metamorphosed into 'bud'. This was peculiar to my age group at the time, ages from 11 - 14. Other examples of usage are: 'He's a bud kid'; 'this is so fucking bud'; 'what a bud place' and 'I hate school, it's so bud'. WHen Mark was 25, he was amazed to hear kids as young a 9, saying it. As far as he knows, people still use it in the Haydon Wick/Greenmeadow/Moredon/Rodbourne Cheney areas - aging from schoolchildren to grown ups of 40. It has permeated out to other areas of Swindon as well.

Meaning of tisty tosties

tisty tosties means: Pine cones. Contributor says he has absolutly no idea why the word was used or why we would talk about pine cones.

Meaning of litnoids

litnoids means: (ed: well ok. I have no idea whatsoever what this is about and I need help - though I suspect so does the person who send the words in. If you know what they are, then you are either very clever, or as bad as the original contributor - either way please leet me know and I'll update the definitions) Entered verbatim: No silly, you have litnoids, lefthanded litnoids,a qwatalitz, quatanoid & a halfnoid. This is driving me nuts... I sure hope you can help. I have searched noids till I'm blue! Qwatalitz??? ... quatanoid... halfnoid?????????

Meaning of codswallop

codswallop means: n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse.

Meaning of dosh

dosh means: slang for a reasonable amount of spending money, for instance enough for a 'night-out'. Almost certainly and logically derived from the slang 'doss-house', meaning a very cheap hostel or room, from Elizabethan England when 'doss' was a straw bed, from 'dossel' meaning bundle of straw, in turn from the French 'dossier' meaning bundle. Dosh appears to have originated in this form in the US in the 19th century, and then re-emerged in more popular use in the UK in the mid-20th century.

Meaning of jib (2)

jib (2) means: (1) Describe something that someone does not want to say e.g. a coarse word such as sex or fingering someone. (2) As a word to replace any other word really. An example sentence: did you see that man jibbing along., There are many different forms of the word jibs, including, jibbed, jibbing, jib and jibbified and all of these words are in extensive use in many secondary schools in SE England. Jamie and Adam thought of this word and are proud of how it has been used.

Meaning of bagel bumper

bagel bumper means: Female homosexual, i.e. bagel being the bread role with the hole, bearing some (albeit very little) resemblance to a vagina. Contributor isn't sure if the word dates to school days, and was more likely at sixth form college.

Meaning of rock

rock means: (1) A basketball. This is a very common word for a basketball in US high schools. (2) In The north of England this means strong, good at fighting, i.e. 'hard or 'nails, as in 'Divvent start on him, he’s rock him man'.

Meaning of hait, hate

hait, hate means: Love, be attracted to. Reversed term. Used as "I hait you and you hait me so why dont we go out together?" Term mainly used by teenagers now-a-days to confuse each other and adults. . Hait is a contextual word for The contributor says he usually uses it as a relpacement for 'love' when around parents so they dont know what's being talked about. Hait is pronounced just like hate. But with different meanings. Contributor really likes this word because they think it is really funny to see peoples expressions when you say you hait them... Isn't suggesting saying it to a girl/boy friend. The word has just recently become a popular slang term and is used frequently on the streets.

Meaning of dirty sanchez

dirty sanchez means: The act of giving your 'intercourse partner' a mustache made of their own feces. Contributor says this is either very sexy and erotic or disgusting and amazing. (ed: I make no comment)

Meaning of Ideographical

Ideographical means: Of or pertaining to an ideogram; representing ideas by symbols, independently of sounds; as, 9 represents not the word "nine," but the idea of the number itself.

Meaning of Word

Word means: The spoken sign of a conception or an idea; an articulate or vocal sound, or a combination of articulate and vocal sounds, uttered by the human voice, and by custom expressing an idea or ideas; a single component part of human speech or language; a constituent part of a sentence; a term; a vocable.

Meaning of Solve

Solve means: To explain; to resolve; to unfold; to clear up (what is obscure or difficult to be understood); to work out to a result or conclusion; as, to solve a doubt; to solve difficulties; to solve a problem.

Meaning of Mont de piete

Mont de piete means: One of certain public pawnbroking establishments which originated in Italy in the 15th century, the object of which was to lend money at a low rate of interest to poor people in need; -- called also mount of piety. The institution has been adopted in other countries, as in Spain and France. See Lombard-house.

Meaning of Nice

Nice means: Pleasing; agreeable; gratifying; delightful; good; as, a nice party; a nice excursion; a nice person; a nice day; a nice sauce, etc.

Meaning of Harquebuse

Harquebuse means: A firearm with match holder, trigger, and tumbler, made in the second half of the 15th century. the barrel was about forty inches long. A form of the harquebus was subsequently called arquebus with matchlock.

Meaning of Nice

Nice means: Done or made with careful labor; suited to excite admiration on account of exactness; evidencing great skill; exact; fine; finished; as, nice proportions, nice workmanship, a nice application; exactly or fastidiously discriminated; requiring close discrimination; as, a nice point of law, a nice distinction in philosophy.

Meaning of Falconet

Falconet means: One of the smaller cannon used in the 15th century and later.

Meaning of Nice

Nice means: Foolish; silly; simple; ignorant; also, weak; effeminate.

Meaning of Ideas

Ideas means: of Idea

Meaning of Own

Own means: Belonging to; belonging exclusively or especially to; peculiar; -- most frequently following a possessive pronoun, as my, our, thy, your, his, her, its, their, in order to emphasize or intensify the idea of property, peculiar interest, or exclusive ownership; as, my own father; my own composition; my own idea; at my own price.

Meaning of Sallet

Sallet means: A light kind of helmet, with or without a visor, introduced during the 15th century.

Meaning of Stammel

Stammel means: A red dye, used in England in the 15th and 16th centuries.

Meaning of Paracelsian

Paracelsian means: Of, pertaining to, or in conformity with, the practice of Paracelsus, a Swiss physician of the 15th century.

Meaning of Petronel

Petronel means: A sort of hand cannon, or portable firearm, used in France in the 15th century.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Claim

Claim means: To ask for, or seek to obtain, by virtue of authority, right, or supposed right; to challenge as a right; to demand as due.

Meaning of Empower

Empower means: To give moral or physical power, faculties, or abilities to.

Meaning of Owl

Owl means: To pry about; to prowl.

Meaning of Tradescantia

Tradescantia means: A genus including spiderwort and Wandering Jew.

Meaning of Unoperative

Unoperative means: Producing no effect; inoperative.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of TENT PEG

TENT PEG means: Tent peg is London Cockney rhyming slang for an egg.

Meaning of smack

smack means: To slap. Note: also pronounced "shmack"; "He got smacked right in the jaw."

Meaning of Uncut

Uncut means: Uncircumcised penis.

Meaning of Off your trolley

Off your trolley means: bonkers, crazy, mad

Meaning of Tea

Tea means: This usually means a cup of tea, but in some parts of the UK it also means the evening meal. How confusing.

Tags: Slang Meaning of Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest.. The slang definition of Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest.? Please, add a definition of Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest. if you did not find one from a search of Nice sounding word but contributor says he has no idea how or why it was used. Could be as old as the 15th century and may be associated with the North of England. If you have any ideas it would solve a dilema for us. We look forward to your help. Of course it could just be another form of 'dawdled' which would be a bit silly, so we await your comment with interest..

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