Slang meaning of ginge minge

ginge minge means: Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare.

What is the slang meaning/definition of ginge minge ?

ginge minge means: Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare.

Slang definition of ginge minge

ginge minge means: Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare.

More meanings / definitions of Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare. or words, sentences containing Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare.?

Envelop (n.): A set of limits for the performance capabilities of some type of machine, originally used to refer to aircraft. Now also used metaphorically to refer to capabilities of any system in general, including human organizations, esp. in the phrase push the envelope. It is used to refer to the maximum performance available at the current state of the technology, and therefore refers to a class of machines in general, not a specific machine.

Snap (v. t.): A thin, crisp cake, usually small, and flavored with ginger; -- used chiefly in the plural.

School (n.): A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school.

Gingerbread (n.): A kind of plain sweet cake seasoned with ginger, and sometimes made in fanciful shapes.

Sea ginger (): A hydroid coral of the genus Millepora, especially M. alcicornis, of the West Indies and Florida. So called because it stings the tongue like ginger. See Illust. under Millepore.

Phrase (n.): A brief expression, sometimes a single word, but usually two or more words forming an expression by themselves, or being a portion of a sentence; as, an adverbial phrase.

Abbreviation (n.): The form to which a word or phrase is reduced by contraction and omission; a letter or letters, standing for a word or phrase of which they are a part; as, Gen. for Genesis; U.S.A. for United States of America.

Phrasal (a.): Of the nature of a phrase; consisting of a phrase; as, a phrasal adverb.

Phrase (v. i.): To group notes into phrases; as, he phrases well. See Phrase, n., 4.

Vogue (n.): The way or fashion of people at any particular time; temporary mode, custom, or practice; popular reception for the time; -- used now generally in the phrase in vogue.

Fiddledeedee (interj.): An exclamatory word or phrase, equivalent to nonsense!

Translation (n.): A transfer of meaning in a word or phrase, a metaphor; a tralation.

Avaunt (interj.): Begone; depart; -- a word of contempt or abhorrence, equivalent to the phrase "Get thee gone."

Hermeneutical (a.): Unfolding the signification; of or pertaining to interpretation; exegetical; explanatory; as, hermeneutic theology, or the art of expounding the Scriptures; a hermeneutic phrase.

Amphibology (n.): A phrase, discourse, or proposition, susceptible of two interpretations; and hence, of uncertain meaning. It differs from equivocation, which arises from the twofold sense of a single term.

Wanion (n.): A word of uncertain signification, used only in the phrase with a wanion, apparently equivalent to with a vengeance, with a plague, or with misfortune.

Rewel bone (): An obsolete phrase of disputed meaning, -- perhaps, smooth or polished bone.

Modus (n.): A fixed compensation or equivalent given instead of payment of tithes in kind, expressed in full by the phrase modus decimandi.

Literal (a.): According to the letter or verbal expression; real; not figurative or metaphorical; as, the literal meaning of a phrase.

Idiomatical (a.): Of or pertaining to, or conforming to, the mode of expression peculiar to a language; as, an idiomatic meaning; an idiomatic phrase.

Define (v. t.): To determine the precise signification of; to fix the meaning of; to describe accurately; to explain; to expound or interpret; as, to define a word, a phrase, or a scientific term.

Refer (v. t.): Hence: To send or direct away; to send or direct elsewhere, as for treatment, aid, information, decision, etc.; to make over, or pass over, to another; as, to refer a student to an author; to refer a beggar to an officer; to refer a bill to a committee; a court refers a matter of fact to a commissioner for investigation, or refers a question of law to a superior tribunal.

Trice (n.): A very short time; an instant; a moment; -- now used only in the phrase in a trice.

Specie (): abl. of L. species sort, kind. Used in the phrase in specie, that is, in sort, in kind, in (its own) form.

Phrasing (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Phrase

Jar (n.): A turn. [Only in phrase.]

Phrased (imp. & p. p.): of Phrase

Rosalia (n.): A form of melody in which a phrase or passage is successively repeated, each time a step or half step higher; a melodic sequence.

Along (): (Now heard only in the prep. phrase along of.)

Phraseogram (n.): A symbol for a phrase.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare.

Meaning of ginge minge

ginge minge means: Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare.

Meaning of minter

minter means: At school there was a red haired lad who complained that he was being called ginger minger. The teacher, seemingly unaware of what a minge was and slightly hard of hearing, was nevertheless outraged by the upset caused to this boy and held a special assembly n the school hall. He said that it was no longer acceptable to refer to red haired pupils as 'ginger minters'. As a result the word Minter immediately became the most popular word in the school, being used with gay abandon at anyone who had even the merest hint of ginger in their hair. To my knowledge this term of abuse travelled to a number of universities when the boys in that year left school.

Meaning of ginger knob /minge

ginger knob /minge means: Noun. A person with ginger hair. Male being ginger knob (also ginger nob), and female, ginger minge. Derog.

Meaning of ginger

ginger means: Noun. 1. Homosexual. Rhyming slang, from Ginger beer - 'queer'. 2. A ginger or red haired person. Pronounced with hard g's as in goggles. 3. Carbonated drink, such as cola. [Scottish use]

Meaning of got your tatties in

got your tatties in means: The phrase means 'have you got any dried bits of poo on your bum' ('Tatties' pronounced 'tay-tees') Though the contributor has no idea why the phrase was used!. (ed: maybe there was the faint aroma of 'fertiliser' in the air when they were about?)

Meaning of All the way

All the way means: Served with all the toppings For a burger, this usually means "with lettuce, mayonnaise, onion, and butter." This phrase may also refer to chocolate cake with chocolate ice cream.

Meaning of All the way

All the way means: Served with all the toppings For a burger, this usually means "with lettuce, mayonnaise, onion, and butter." This phrase may also refer to chocolate cake with chocolate ice cream.

Meaning of om, om-ertz

om, om-ertz means: Contraction of a contraction of 'homosexual'. Contributor explains it as follows: "By the time I was at school (started primary in 86) 'hom' was out of use and had been bastardised to 'om'(I'm fairly sure that 'hom' must be its origin, but its a cross with 'orrr') and was used when another person had done something really bad/said a rude word or whatever and was an expression of shock - "ooooooommmmmm, I'm telling!". The 'I'm telling' was rarely absent from the phrase. (ed: this seems remarkably similar in form to another entry 'Ah'mer! I'm Telling off you' - I wonder if they're the same thing?) Then a new generation of the word was born in roughly 1990/1. My stepsister and brother were playing with the kids of a family friend, one of whom was called Thomas. Thomas did something wrong and my stepsister came out with 'Ohmas Thomas, I'm telling'. they started using 'omas' at school and now its common in schools across Bolton, usually pronounced 'om-erz',".

Meaning of pecker

pecker means: n penis. A common misconception is that, to Brits, this means “chin” - hence the phrase “keep your pecker up.” Sorry folks, but in the U.K. “pecker” means exactly the same thing as it does in the U.S. The phrase “keep your pecker up” is probably derived from a time when a “pecker” was simply a reference to a bird’s beak and encouraged keeping your head held high. I understand that the word became a euphemism for “penis” after the poet Catullus used it to refer to his love Lesbia’s pet sparrow in a rather suggestive poem which drew some fairly blatant parallels.

Meaning of Bought the farm

Bought the farm means:  ”I didn’t know he wanted to move to the country,” is how a British person might respond to hearing this phrase. At this point ‘bought the farm,’ is a general reference to untimely death. However, the phrase originates from WWII-era military accidents involving unreliable aircraft crashing into rural European countryside properties resulting in damages for which the U.S. government was responsible to pay, thereby, ‘buying the farm,’ so to speak.

Meaning of carrot top

carrot top means: Noun. Nickname for a person with red/ginger hair.

Meaning of Eat My Shorts

Eat My Shorts means: Phrase used as a comeback. Heavily in use in the 80's and also used on TV's 'The Simpsons'. If someone was to put you down in anyway, you can reply with this phrase. Phrase gained earlier popularity from it's use by John Bender (Nelson Judd) in 'The Breakfast Club' (1985) ~Editor

Meaning of gingwah

gingwah means: Person with ginger hair, (the word is pronounced ging-vah.)

Meaning of Ginger Ale

Ginger Ale means: Jail. e's doing time in the ginger.

Meaning of YOUNGIN

YOUNGIN means: An original Hip Hop rhyme/ phrase made popular by MC's (rappers) used to let the crowd no that  "yes. we rockin the spot". A phrase that an MC says before he goes into a written rhyme. Like a prep phrase common with every MC (rapper).

Meaning of YOUNGIN

YOUNGIN means: An original Hip Hop rhyme/ phrase made popular by MC's (rappers) used to let the crowd no that  "yes. we rockin the spot". A phrase that an MC says before he goes into a written rhyme. Like a prep phrase common with every MC (rapper).

Meaning of ginger

ginger means: Male homosexual. From Cockney rhyming slang, ginger beer = queer.

Meaning of GINGER POP

GINGER POP means: Ginger pop is London Cockney rhyming slang for to be arrested (cop).

Meaning of GINGER ALE

GINGER ALE means: Ginger ale is American rhyming slang for gaol

Meaning of Ginger Beer

Ginger Beer means: Queer (odd). I don't know about that - sounds a bit ginger.

Meaning of Envelop

Envelop means: A set of limits for the performance capabilities of some type of machine, originally used to refer to aircraft. Now also used metaphorically to refer to capabilities of any system in general, including human organizations, esp. in the phrase push the envelope. It is used to refer to the maximum performance available at the current state of the technology, and therefore refers to a class of machines in general, not a specific machine.

Meaning of Snap

Snap means: A thin, crisp cake, usually small, and flavored with ginger; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Meaning of School

School means: A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school.

Meaning of Gingerbread

Gingerbread means: A kind of plain sweet cake seasoned with ginger, and sometimes made in fanciful shapes.

Meaning of Sea ginger

Sea ginger means: A hydroid coral of the genus Millepora, especially M. alcicornis, of the West Indies and Florida. So called because it stings the tongue like ginger. See Illust. under Millepore.

Meaning of Phrase

Phrase means: A brief expression, sometimes a single word, but usually two or more words forming an expression by themselves, or being a portion of a sentence; as, an adverbial phrase.

Meaning of Abbreviation

Abbreviation means: The form to which a word or phrase is reduced by contraction and omission; a letter or letters, standing for a word or phrase of which they are a part; as, Gen. for Genesis; U.S.A. for United States of America.

Meaning of Phrasal

Phrasal means: Of the nature of a phrase; consisting of a phrase; as, a phrasal adverb.

Meaning of Phrase

Phrase means: To group notes into phrases; as, he phrases well. See Phrase, n., 4.

Meaning of Vogue

Vogue means: The way or fashion of people at any particular time; temporary mode, custom, or practice; popular reception for the time; -- used now generally in the phrase in vogue.

Meaning of Fiddledeedee

Fiddledeedee means: An exclamatory word or phrase, equivalent to nonsense!

Meaning of Translation

Translation means: A transfer of meaning in a word or phrase, a metaphor; a tralation.

Meaning of Avaunt

Avaunt means: Begone; depart; -- a word of contempt or abhorrence, equivalent to the phrase "Get thee gone."

Meaning of Hermeneutical

Hermeneutical means: Unfolding the signification; of or pertaining to interpretation; exegetical; explanatory; as, hermeneutic theology, or the art of expounding the Scriptures; a hermeneutic phrase.

Meaning of Amphibology

Amphibology means: A phrase, discourse, or proposition, susceptible of two interpretations; and hence, of uncertain meaning. It differs from equivocation, which arises from the twofold sense of a single term.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Croupier

Croupier means: One who, at a public dinner party, sits at the lower end of the table as assistant chairman.

Meaning of Morrice

Morrice means: Same as 1st Morris.

Meaning of Positive

Positive means: That which is capable of being affirmed; reality.

Meaning of Tangalung

Tangalung means: An East Indian civet (Viverra tangalunga).

Meaning of Tawery

Tawery means: A place where skins are tawed.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of DIP

DIP means: Dip is slang for a pickpocket. Dip is slang for a fool.Dip is slang for sexual intercourse.Dip is Black−American slang for a hat.

Meaning of pom-pom

pom-pom means: The sex act fuck.

Meaning of Salting

Salting means: Planting rich ore samples in an unprofitable mine to attract unwary buyers.

Tags: Slang Meaning of Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare.. The slang definition of Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare.? Please, add a definition of Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare. if you did not find one from a search of Self explanatory and was used to refer to people presumed to have ginger coloured pubic hair. The person responsible for this 'crime' was thus referred to as a 'GINGER MINGER'. More interestingly, the phrase survived the trip from Primary to Secondary education, although with a few notable changes. The pronunciation altered so that the phrase was pronounced with French vowels: "gonge monge". Furthermore at Bishop Vesey's Grammar School, the contributor can remember that the phrase was also used to refer to a particular sort of ginger cake available at school dinners. They had a red haired hard of hearing dinner lady in charge of cakes, and so much pleasure was derived by asking for this cake by its nickname. Asking the woman: "Can I have a slice of ginge minge please?" was a phrase so loaded with meaning that at the time it seemed the schoolboy equivalent of Shakespeare..

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