Slang meaning of zit

zit means: A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang.

What is the slang meaning/definition of zit ?

zit means: A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang.

Slang definition of zit

zit means: A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang.

More meanings / definitions of A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang. or words, sentences containing A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang.?

Preposition (n.): A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Th (): In Old English, the article the, when the following word began with a vowel, was often written with elision as if a part of the word. Thus in Chaucer, the forms thabsence, tharray, thegle, thend, thingot, etc., are found for the absence, the array, the eagle, the end, etc.

Abbreviation (n.): The form to which a word or phrase is reduced by contraction and omission; a letter or letters, standing for a word or phrase of which they are a part; as, Gen. for Genesis; U.S.A. for United States of America.

Trochee (n.): A foot of two syllables, the first long and the second short, as in the Latin word ante, or the first accented and the second unaccented, as in the English word motion; a choreus.

Good (superl.): Not small, insignificant, or of no account; considerable; esp., in the phrases a good deal, a good way, a good degree, a good share or part, etc.

Enclitical (v. i.): Affixed; subjoined; -- said of a word or particle which leans back upon the preceding word so as to become a part of it, and to lose its own independent accent, generally varying also the accent of the preceding word.

Laetere Sunday (): The fourth Sunday of Lent; -- so named from the Latin word Laetare (rejoice), the first word in the antiphone of the introit sung that day in the Roman Catholic service.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Initial (n.): The first letter of a word or a name.

Penny (n.): An English coin, formerly of copper, now of bronze, the twelfth part of an English shilling in account value, and equal to four farthings, or about two cents; -- usually indicated by the abbreviation d. (the initial of denarius).

Derivative (n.): A word formed from another word, by a prefix or suffix, an internal modification, or some other change; a word which takes its origin from a root.

Deal (n.): A part or portion; a share; hence, an indefinite quantity, degree, or extent, degree, or extent; as, a deal of time and trouble; a deal of cold.

Par (prep.): By; with; -- used frequently in Early English in phrases taken from the French, being sometimes written as a part of the word which it governs; as, par amour, or paramour; par cas, or parcase; par fay, or parfay.

Standard (a.): Being, affording, or according with, a standard for comparison and judgment; as, standard time; standard weights and measures; a standard authority as to nautical terms; standard gold or silver.

Verbal (a.): Having word answering to word; word for word; literal; as, a verbal translation.

Apocopate (v. t.): To cut off or drop; as, to apocopate a word, or the last letter, syllable, or part of a word.

Syllable (n.): An elementary sound, or a combination of elementary sounds, uttered together, or with a single effort or impulse of the voice, and constituting a word or a part of a word. In other terms, it is a vowel or a diphtong, either by itself or flanked by one or more consonants, the whole produced by a single impulse or utterance. One of the liquids, l, m, n, may fill the place of a vowel in a syllable. Adjoining syllables in a word or phrase need not to be marked off by a pause, but only by such an abatement and renewal, or reenforcement, of the stress as to give the feeling of separate impulses. See Guide to Pronunciation, /275.

Down (prep.): A road for shipping in the English Channel or Straits of Dover, near Deal, employed as a naval rendezvous in time of war.

Number (n.): The distinction of objects, as one, or more than one (in some languages, as one, or two, or more than two), expressed (usually) by a difference in the form of a word; thus, the singular number and the plural number are the names of the forms of a word indicating the objects denoted or referred to by the word as one, or as more than one.

Chickadee (n.): A small bird, the blackcap titmouse (Parus atricapillus), of North America; -- named from its note.

An (conj.): If; -- a word used by old English authors.

Interesting (a.): Engaging the attention; exciting, or adapted to excite, interest, curiosity, or emotion; as, an interesting story; interesting news.

D (): As a numeral D stands for 500. in this use it is not the initial of any word, or even strictly a letter, but one half of the sign / (or / ) the original Tuscan numeral for 1000.

-art (): The termination of many English words; as, coward, reynard, drunkard, mostly from the French, in which language this ending is of German origin, being orig. the same word as English hard. It usually has the sense of one who has to a high or excessive degree the quality expressed by the root; as, braggart, sluggard.

Sans (prep.): Without; deprived or destitute of. Rarely used as an English word.

Anonym (n.): A notion which has no name, or which can not be expressed by a single English word.

Ploughgate (n.): The Scotch equivalent of the English word plowland.

Canyon (n.): The English form of the Spanish word Caon.

Metonymy (n.): A trope in which one word is put for another that suggests it; as, we say, a man keeps a good table instead of good provisions; we read Virgil, that is, his poems; a man has a warm heart, that is, warm affections.

Demisemiquaver (n.): A short note, equal in time to the half of a semiquaver, or the thirty-second part of a whole note.

Like to add another meaning or definition of A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang.

Meaning of zit

zit means: A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang.

Meaning of plook, pluke

plook, pluke means: Spot, pimple, skin blemish.

Meaning of A.C.E.

A.C.E. means: Used to alienate kids who said "ace". People who originally used "ace" to mean "good" suddenly found that the word had been redefined to mean "crap"., This was used in my part of Sheffield, South Yorkshire during the very early 90s and resulted in the total removal of the word "ace" from the school vocabulary because everyone was confused as to the meaning.

Meaning of Whelk

Whelk means: An old name for a pustule, a pimple. The word is not much used in America.

Meaning of Pants

Pants means: CLOTHING RETAILERS TAKE NOTE: The Brits say ‘trousers’ … The American default word for the article of clothing that covers the legs and pelvic region seems pretty general and innocuous to English speakers in the U.S. To the actual English, however, ‘pants’ is the primary word they use for ‘underwear.’ And while American cinema and television typically writes the word ‘knickers’ for underwear into the vocabulary of British characters

Meaning of socco

socco means: Contributor says he first came across this word in a juvenile novel entitled "Go Saddle The Sea", by Joan Aiken. It was used by English schoolboys in the earlier part of this century in the same context as "crazy"; as in having a crush/infatuation. Illustration: "I'm quite socco over the new Maths teacher.". He doesn't know if this word is still in use, if it was ever in use at all, outside of that boarding school which might or might not have ever existed. (ed: don't call us and we won't call you - ok??)

Meaning of yosser

yosser means: used for anyone with the surname Jones (also apparently Hughes... from the series "Boys from the blackstuff" by Alan Bleasedale - and also for Geoff Hughes dad!).

Meaning of yosser, yozzer

yosser, yozzer means: Used for anyone with the surname Jones (also apparently Hughes... from the series "Boys from the blackstuff" by Alan Bleasedale - and also for Geoff Hughes dad!).

Meaning of ZIT

ZIT means: Zit is slang for a spot, pimple or boil on the skin (acne).

Meaning of gaffe

gaffe means: n home. Rather a London-centric word: Why don’t we go back to my gaffe and skin up? The shorter word “gaff” (to make a foolish error) is the same in both U.K. and U.S. English.

Meaning of frigging

frigging means: More than just a substitute for the word 'fucking', this word has been in use in it's own right for hundreds of years and really doesn't constitute 'slang'. It is just another English language word for the sexual act that has come to be considered 'vulgar'.

Meaning of inabit

inabit means: A replacement for "Goodbye" or "See you later," as in "I will see you in a bit (of time)." e.g. "Inabit kidder!" Contributor claims to have coined this as a word in 1995 at the age of 9, at one "hometime" at Rathbone School (now demolished,). He was told that people were using this word before that time, but would like someone to confirm it please.

Meaning of Damn

Damn means: Stupid, ludicrous or a (popular) word to express mild aggression. However, that the word Damn can be used or spoken in a way that denotes it as a curse or swear word, as generally looked upon in the United States of America. But speaking the word Damn is not considered to be in this category"

Meaning of flag

flag means: five pound note (£5), UK, notably in Manchester (ack Michael Hicks); also a USA one dollar bill; also used as a slang term for a money note in Australia although Cassells is vague about the value (if you know please contact us). The word flag has been used since the 1500s as a slang expression for various types of money, and more recently for certain notes. Originally (16th-19thC) the slang word flag was used for an English fourpenny groat coin, derived possibly from Middle Low German word 'Vleger' meaning a coin worth 'more than a Bremer groat' (Cassells). Derivation in the USA would likely also have been influenced by the slang expression 'Jewish Flag' or 'Jews Flag' for a $1 bill, from early 20th century, being an envious derogatory reference to perceived and stereotypical Jewish success in business and finance.

Meaning of Zonked

Zonked means: A spot, pimple or boil on the skin

Meaning of zit

zit means: Noun. A spot, pimple or boil on the skin. [Orig. U.S.]

Meaning of om, om-ertz

om, om-ertz means: Contraction of a contraction of 'homosexual'. Contributor explains it as follows: "By the time I was at school (started primary in 86) 'hom' was out of use and had been bastardised to 'om'(I'm fairly sure that 'hom' must be its origin, but its a cross with 'orrr') and was used when another person had done something really bad/said a rude word or whatever and was an expression of shock - "ooooooommmmmm, I'm telling!". The 'I'm telling' was rarely absent from the phrase. (ed: this seems remarkably similar in form to another entry 'Ah'mer! I'm Telling off you' - I wonder if they're the same thing?) Then a new generation of the word was born in roughly 1990/1. My stepsister and brother were playing with the kids of a family friend, one of whom was called Thomas. Thomas did something wrong and my stepsister came out with 'Ohmas Thomas, I'm telling'. they started using 'omas' at school and now its common in schools across Bolton, usually pronounced 'om-erz',".

Meaning of mallie

mallie means: Homosexual. Used as term of abuse to describe somebody who was gay (or appeared to be). Also used to describe the act of homosexual intercourse (ie. "He mallied him!") f. Allegedly, the word came into use following an incident with a boy named "Malcolm" and another man, but has since found to be untrue. However, the word remained in use at the contributors school in Durham for many years after the supposed event.

Meaning of fanny (2)

fanny (2) means: Rear end, ass, butt, bottom, bum, situpon (contributors note:) Kind of interesting to see how word meanings can differ so greatly - remind me never to use this one in the UK!

Meaning of chailey

chailey means: Mentally ambiguous. The word 'Chailey' was used to describe a person in exactly the same way as the word 'Joey' or 'Deacon'would have been. The word 'Chailey' was taken from the name of a Special Needs school called Chailey Heritage based about 10 miles from the school. http://www.chaileyheritage.e-sussex.sch.uk

Meaning of Preposition

Preposition means: A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Meaning of Th

Th means: In Old English, the article the, when the following word began with a vowel, was often written with elision as if a part of the word. Thus in Chaucer, the forms thabsence, tharray, thegle, thend, thingot, etc., are found for the absence, the array, the eagle, the end, etc.

Meaning of Abbreviation

Abbreviation means: The form to which a word or phrase is reduced by contraction and omission; a letter or letters, standing for a word or phrase of which they are a part; as, Gen. for Genesis; U.S.A. for United States of America.

Meaning of Trochee

Trochee means: A foot of two syllables, the first long and the second short, as in the Latin word ante, or the first accented and the second unaccented, as in the English word motion; a choreus.

Meaning of Good

Good means: Not small, insignificant, or of no account; considerable; esp., in the phrases a good deal, a good way, a good degree, a good share or part, etc.

Meaning of Enclitical

Enclitical means: Affixed; subjoined; -- said of a word or particle which leans back upon the preceding word so as to become a part of it, and to lose its own independent accent, generally varying also the accent of the preceding word.

Meaning of Laetere Sunday

Laetere Sunday means: The fourth Sunday of Lent; -- so named from the Latin word Laetare (rejoice), the first word in the antiphone of the introit sung that day in the Roman Catholic service.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Meaning of Initial

Initial means: The first letter of a word or a name.

Meaning of Penny

Penny means: An English coin, formerly of copper, now of bronze, the twelfth part of an English shilling in account value, and equal to four farthings, or about two cents; -- usually indicated by the abbreviation d. (the initial of denarius).

Meaning of Derivative

Derivative means: A word formed from another word, by a prefix or suffix, an internal modification, or some other change; a word which takes its origin from a root.

Meaning of Deal

Deal means: A part or portion; a share; hence, an indefinite quantity, degree, or extent, degree, or extent; as, a deal of time and trouble; a deal of cold.

Meaning of Par

Par means: By; with; -- used frequently in Early English in phrases taken from the French, being sometimes written as a part of the word which it governs; as, par amour, or paramour; par cas, or parcase; par fay, or parfay.

Meaning of Standard

Standard means: Being, affording, or according with, a standard for comparison and judgment; as, standard time; standard weights and measures; a standard authority as to nautical terms; standard gold or silver.

Meaning of Verbal

Verbal means: Having word answering to word; word for word; literal; as, a verbal translation.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Bone

Bone means: To withdraw bones from the flesh of, as in cookery.

Meaning of Chantry

Chantry means: A chapel or altar so endowed.

Meaning of Chiromancer

Chiromancer means: One who practices chiromancy.

Meaning of Cremator

Cremator means: One who, or that which, cremates or consumes to ashes.

Meaning of Earthworm

Earthworm means: A mean, sordid person; a niggard.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of JOE BLAKES

JOE BLAKES means: Joe Blakes is London Cockney rhyming slang for shakes.

Meaning of STG

STG means: Shut The F**k Up.

Meaning of Cheddar

Cheddar means: Money, cash, etc.

Meaning of CHINA WHITE

CHINA WHITE means: heroin

Tags: Slang Meaning of A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang.. The slang definition of A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang.? Please, add a definition of A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang. if you did not find one from a search of A pimple, spot, any skin blemish Geoff Hughes remarks, that it's interesting to note that before the 1980's it was unheard of in the UK. However, around that time an English comedian named Jasper Carrott visited America and returned with the word as part of his act. Following a good deal of initial amusement among school-kids the word has become standard slang..

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