Slang meaning of bring out

bring out means: To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin.

What is the slang meaning/definition of bring out ?

bring out means: To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin.

Slang definition of bring out

bring out means: To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin.

More meanings / definitions of To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin. or words, sentences containing To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin.?

Usage (n.): The act of using; mode of using or treating; treatment; conduct with respect to a person or a thing; as, good usage; ill usage; hard usage.

Authorize (v. t.): To establish by authority, as by usage or public opinion; to sanction; as, idioms authorized by usage.

Custom (n.): Long-established practice, considered as unwritten law, and resting for authority on long consent; usage. See Usage, and Prescription.

Survival (n.): Any habit, usage, or belief, remaining from ancient times, the origin of which is often unknown, or imperfectly known.

Entree (n.): In French usage, a dish served at the beginning of dinner to give zest to the appetite; in English usage, a side dish, served with a joint, or between the courses, as a cutlet, scalloped oysters, etc.

Irregular (a.): Not regular; not conforming to a law, method, or usage recognized as the general rule; not according to common form; not conformable to nature, to the rules of moral rectitude, or to established principles; not normal; unnatural; immethodical; unsymmetrical; erratic; no straight; not uniform; as, an irregular line; an irregular figure; an irregular verse; an irregular physician; an irregular proceeding; irregular motion; irregular conduct, etc. Cf. Regular.

Establish (a.): To secure public recognition in favor of; to prove and cause to be accepted as true; as, to establish a fact, usage, principle, opinion, doctrine, etc.

Interesting (a.): Engaging the attention; exciting, or adapted to excite, interest, curiosity, or emotion; as, an interesting story; interesting news.

Pacinian (a.): Of, pertaining to, or discovered by, Filippo Pacini, an Italian physician of the 19th century.

Habit (n.): Fixed or established custom; ordinary course of conduct; practice; usage; hence, prominently, the involuntary tendency or aptitude to perform certain actions which is acquired by their frequent repetition; as, habit is second nature; also, peculiar ways of acting; characteristic forms of behavior.

Momier (n.): A name given in contempt to strict Calvinists in Switzerland, France, and some parts of Germany, in the early part of the 19th century.

Usage (n.): Experience.

Usurpation (n.): Use; usage; custom.

Unusage (n.): Want or lack of usage.

Usance (v. t.): Use; usage; employment.

Wont (n.): Custom; habit; use; usage.

Usage (n.): Manners; conduct; behavior.

Usance (v. t.): Custom; practice; usage.

Maltreament (n.): Ill treatment; ill usage; abuse.

Consuetude (n.): Custom, habit; usage.

Lady (n.): A wife; -- not now in approved usage.

Moderate (n.): One of a party in the Church of Scotland in the 18th century, and part of the 19th, professing moderation in matters of church government, in discipline, and in doctrine.

Wone (a.): Custom; habit; wont; use; usage.

Diswont (v. t.): To deprive of wonted usage; to disaccustom.

Tack (v. t.): In parliamentary usage, to add (a supplement) to a bill; to append; -- often with on or to.

Batter (v. t.): To wear or impair as if by beating or by hard usage.

Day (n.): Those hours, or the daily recurring period, allotted by usage or law for work.

Formative (n.): A word formed in accordance with some rule or usage, as from a root.

Orthographize (v. t.): To spell correctly or according to usage; to correct in regard to spelling.

Usage (n.): Customary use or employment, as of a word or phrase in a particular sense or signification.

Like to add another meaning or definition of To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin.

Meaning of bring out

bring out means: To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin.

Meaning of out

out means: To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin.

Meaning of Conning Tower

Conning Tower means: 1. The armoured control tower of an iron or steel warship built between the mid-19th and mid-20th century from which the ship was navigated in battle. 2. A tower-like structure on the dorsal (topside) surface of a submarine, serving in submarines built before the mid-20th century as a connecting structure between the bridge and pressure hull and housing instruments and controls from which the periscopes were used to direct the submarine and launch torpedo attacks. Since the mid-20th century, it has been replaced by the sail (United States usage) or fin (European and British Commonwealth usage), a structure similar in appearance which no longer plays a function in directing the submarine.

Meaning of Midshipman

Midshipman means: 1. During the 17th century, a naval rating for an experienced seaman. 2. From the 18th century, a naval commissioned officer candidate. 3. From the 1790s, an apprentice naval officer. 4. From the 19th century, an officer cadet at a naval academy. 5. In contemporary RCN usage, the term is sometimes used for a second year Naval Cadet.

Meaning of bob

bob means: shilling (1/-), although in recent times now means a pound or a dollar in certain regions. Historically bob was slang for a British shilling (Twelve old pence, pre-decimalisation - and twenty shillings to a pound). No plural version; it was 'thirty bob' not 'thirty bobs'. Prior to 1971 bob was one of the most commonly used English slang words. Now sadly gone in the UK for this particular meaning, although lots of other meanings remain (for example the verb or noun meaning of pooh, a haircut, and the verb meaning of cheat). Usage of bob for shilling dates back to the late 1700s. Origin is not known for sure. Possibilities include a connection with the church or bell-ringing since 'bob' meant a set of changes rung on the bells. This would be consistent with one of the possible origins and associations of the root of the word Shilling, (from Proto-Germanic 'skell' meaning to sound or ring). There is possibly an association with plumb-bob, being another symbolic piece of metal, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. Brewer's 1870 Dictionary of Phrase and Fable states that 'bob' could be derived from 'Bawbee', which was 16-19th century slang for a half-penny, in turn derived from: French 'bas billon', meaning debased copper money (coins were commonly cut to make change). Brewer also references the Laird of Sillabawby, a 16th century mintmaster, as a possible origin. Also perhaps a connection with a plumb-bob, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. 'Bob a nob', in the early 1800s meant 'a shilling a head', when estimating costs of meals, etc. In the 18th century 'bobstick' was a shillings-worth of gin. In parts of the US 'bob' was used for the US dollar coin. I am also informed (thanks K Inglott, March 2007) that bob is now slang for a pound in his part of the world (Bath, South-West England), and has also been used as money slang, presumably for Australian dollars, on the Home and Away TV soap series. A popular slang word like bob arguably develops a life of its own. Additionally (ack Martin Symington, Jun 2007) the word 'bob' is still commonly used among the white community of Tanzania in East Africa for the Tanzanian Shilling.

Meaning of tickey/ticky/tickie/tiki/tikki/tikkie

tickey/ticky/tickie/tiki/tikki/tikkie means: ticky or tickey was an old pre-decimal British silver threepenny piece (3d, equating loosely to 1¼p). The tickey slang was in use in 1950s UK (in Birmingham for example, thanks M Bramich), although the slang is more popular in South Africa, from which the British usage seems derived. In South Africa the various spellings refer to a SA threepenny piece, and now the equivalent SA post-decimalisation 2½ cents coin. South African tickey and variations - also meaning 'small' - are first recorded in the 19th century from uncertain roots (according to Partridge and Cassells) - take your pick: African distorted interpretation of 'ticket' or 'threepenny'; from Romany tikeno and tikno (meaning small); from Dutch stukje (meaning a little bit); from Hindustani taka (a stamped silver coin); and/or from early Portuguese 'pataca' and French 'patac' (meaning what?.. Partridge doesn't say).

Meaning of technicolour yawn

technicolour yawn means: Noun. An act of vomiting. Jocular usage. [Orig Aust. 1960s]

Meaning of absolute code

absolute code means: The absolute code is that you do not expose a fellow homosexual to his straight friends, boss, or to the press. It is considered unfair to bring another gay or lesbian out. Coming out is a individual decision. Exposing that someone is gay. The person could, lost of job or position with straight friends, or family that one is not ready for.

Meaning of Shanty

Shanty means: also spelled "chantey" A song with chorus sung by sailors as an aid to work on a ship. The earliest references to sailors songs date from the 16th century, but most shanties known today (such as Blow the Man Down, Rio Grande and A-rovin') are of 19th-century origin, while the term itself is even more recent.

Meaning of Gordon Bennett

Gordon Bennett means: An expression of surprise; an euphemism avoiding the word 'God.', Based on James Gordon Bennett II, a 19th century hot-air balloonist and pilot who supposedly flew a small one-man plane into a barn, whilst lookers-on exclaimed: "Gordon Bennett!" The shortened name contributed to the popularity of the phrase, which died out and then regained usage in the 1980s. More information about Bennett and other famous Gordons, here: http://www.quinion.com/words/articles/gordon.htm

Meaning of So

So means: adv. very much. Traditionally used as intensifying adverb for lone adjectives, usage expanded to intensify whole clauses, predicates, phrases, etc. Usage may have gained popularity on TV's "Friends." (Chandler: "That is so not the opposite of taking somebody's underwear!"...Joey, jokingly: "So didn't know that, but you should have seen your faces")

Meaning of dosh

dosh means: slang for a reasonable amount of spending money, for instance enough for a 'night-out'. Almost certainly and logically derived from the slang 'doss-house', meaning a very cheap hostel or room, from Elizabethan England when 'doss' was a straw bed, from 'dossel' meaning bundle of straw, in turn from the French 'dossier' meaning bundle. Dosh appears to have originated in this form in the US in the 19th century, and then re-emerged in more popular use in the UK in the mid-20th century.

Meaning of innit

innit means: Contracted form of "isn't it?", doesn't it, don't they etc. Origin possible UK Euro-Asian, although I heard it during the 1960's in Italian restaurants in South Wales. Prob. adaptation of earlier "it-int, int-it", London usage similar meaning. Pronounced with stress on 1st and 3rd syll. Example of use: "You goin' wi mi sister, init". May thus be used in interrogative form or may be used rhetorically - init! (ed: many thanks to my friend Kevin Allen for making that totally incomprehensible!)

Meaning of UNO/UNU

UNO/UNU means: you-all. pron. you, plural. In usage close to Afro-American y'awl. From Ibo unu, same meaning

Meaning of way

way means: Used to affirm the positivity of your statment after someone conveys their doubt or disbelief. This was popularized by the characters Wayne and Garth in the "Wayne's World" sequences in the US television show Saturday Night Live. One character would say something, the other would say, "No way!" Then, "Way!" "No way!" "Way!" Back and forth. This has entered common usage to a degree that one can use the expression "Way!" to assert the truthfulness of something, even if the other person doesn't use the exact phrase, i.e., "No way!", "Is that true?", "Way!". (ed: the film Waynes World 1 is still one of the all time greatest weirdo movies!)

Meaning of gollywog

gollywog means: This was a fairly innocuous much loved childrens toy for most of the last century until political correctness stepped in and demanded they be banned. The reason given was that these dolls were created to look more like the 'minstrels' from 'down south' than a true representation of the facial features of black africans! Well ok that might be true true, but racially denigrating?? I think not! A further result of this idiocy was that Robertsons Jams (who had been using the golliwog symbol for a hundred years was subject to repeated attempts to force them to remove the symbol from their jams and marmalades. Trouble is all the fuss did was to draw attention to the negative aspects and the creation of chants such as: get back on your jam jar, get back on your jam jar, la la la la,la la la la, (then repeated once more).

Meaning of What's Your 20?

What's Your 20? means: Derivation of the CB radio term "10-20"--meaning one's present location. In common usage, the phrase "What's your 20?" is someone asking where you are or live.

Meaning of nem tudom

nem tudom means: Word used to describe a person that is unsure of their sexuality. Used initially by the Aboriginies of Australia back in the 19th century. (ed: sounds a bit 'iffy' to me.)

Meaning of hit list

hit list means: These are the riders that have attcked and dropped you when you have been down on form, or comming back from an injury. Usage: "When I get back in form, those pricks are on my hit list."

Meaning of Gun Deck

Gun Deck means: 1. Up through the 19th century, a deck aboard a ship that was primarily used for the mounting of cannons to be fired broadside. 2. On smaller vessels (of frigate size or smaller) up through the 19th century, the completely covered level under the upper deck, even though in such smaller ships it carried none of the ship's guns.

Meaning of Usage

Usage means: The act of using; mode of using or treating; treatment; conduct with respect to a person or a thing; as, good usage; ill usage; hard usage.

Meaning of Authorize

Authorize means: To establish by authority, as by usage or public opinion; to sanction; as, idioms authorized by usage.

Meaning of Custom

Custom means: Long-established practice, considered as unwritten law, and resting for authority on long consent; usage. See Usage, and Prescription.

Meaning of Survival

Survival means: Any habit, usage, or belief, remaining from ancient times, the origin of which is often unknown, or imperfectly known.

Meaning of Entree

Entree means: In French usage, a dish served at the beginning of dinner to give zest to the appetite; in English usage, a side dish, served with a joint, or between the courses, as a cutlet, scalloped oysters, etc.

Meaning of Irregular

Irregular means: Not regular; not conforming to a law, method, or usage recognized as the general rule; not according to common form; not conformable to nature, to the rules of moral rectitude, or to established principles; not normal; unnatural; immethodical; unsymmetrical; erratic; no straight; not uniform; as, an irregular line; an irregular figure; an irregular verse; an irregular physician; an irregular proceeding; irregular motion; irregular conduct, etc. Cf. Regular.

Meaning of Establish

Establish means: To secure public recognition in favor of; to prove and cause to be accepted as true; as, to establish a fact, usage, principle, opinion, doctrine, etc.

Meaning of Interesting

Interesting means: Engaging the attention; exciting, or adapted to excite, interest, curiosity, or emotion; as, an interesting story; interesting news.

Meaning of Pacinian

Pacinian means: Of, pertaining to, or discovered by, Filippo Pacini, an Italian physician of the 19th century.

Meaning of Habit

Habit means: Fixed or established custom; ordinary course of conduct; practice; usage; hence, prominently, the involuntary tendency or aptitude to perform certain actions which is acquired by their frequent repetition; as, habit is second nature; also, peculiar ways of acting; characteristic forms of behavior.

Meaning of Momier

Momier means: A name given in contempt to strict Calvinists in Switzerland, France, and some parts of Germany, in the early part of the 19th century.

Meaning of Usage

Usage means: Experience.

Meaning of Usurpation

Usurpation means: Use; usage; custom.

Meaning of Unusage

Unusage means: Want or lack of usage.

Meaning of Usance

Usance means: Use; usage; employment.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Alto

Alto means: An alto singer.

Meaning of Chain

Chain means: A series of links or rings, usually of metal, connected, or fitted into one another, used for various purposes, as of support, of restraint, of ornament, of the exertion and transmission of mechanical power, etc.

Meaning of Nelumbo

Nelumbo means: A genus of great water lilies. The North American species is Nelumbo lutea, the Asiatic is the sacred lotus, N. speciosa.

Meaning of Olibene

Olibene means: A colorless mobile liquid of a pleasant aromatic odor obtained by the distillation of olibanum, or frankincense, and regarded as a terpene; -- called also conimene.

Meaning of Trinoctial

Trinoctial means: Lasting during three nights; comprising three nights.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of pear-shaped

pear-shaped means: adj gone wrong. Usually it’s meant in a rather jovial sense, in a similar way to the American expression “out of kilter” or “off kilter”: Well, I was supposed to have a civilised dinner with my mates but we had a few drinks and it all went a bit pear-shaped. You would be less likely to see: Well, she went in for the operation but the transplant organ’s been rejected and the doctor says it’s all gone a bit pear-shaped. Possible derivations involve glass-blowing or hot-air ballooning. Separately.

Meaning of tomato sauce

tomato sauce means: n tomato ketchup. In the U.K. these two terms are interchangeable although “tomato ketchup” is in more common use, as tomato sauce could equally easily refer to the pasta-type sauce in a jar or can.

Meaning of fadge

fadge means: to bustle about; to manage. “I got to fadge for myself now”

Meaning of issue

issue means: Problem. There is some major ish going on here.

Tags: Slang Meaning of To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin.. The slang definition of To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin.? Please, add a definition of To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin. if you did not find one from a search of To seduce a (putatively) straight man, thus exposing his true nature and liberating his sublimated, gay orienatation. This usage goes way back--maybe to the 19th century. Interesting that it seems lost now. This was the meaning of "out" in the 1960s. All other gay usage of "out" seem to come from this origin..

Copyrights © 2016 LingoMash. All Rights Reserved.