Slang meaning of long-tailed 'un/long-tailed finnip

long-tailed 'un/long-tailed finnip means: high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value.

What is the slang meaning/definition of long-tailed 'un/long-tailed finnip ?

long-tailed 'un/long-tailed finnip means: high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value.

Slang definition of long-tailed 'un/long-tailed finnip

long-tailed 'un/long-tailed finnip means: high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value.

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More meanings / definitions of high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value. or words, sentences containing high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value.?

Cantarro (n.): A weight used in southern Europe and East for heavy articles. It varies in different localities; thus, at Rome it is nearly 75 pounds, in Sardinia nearly 94 pounds, in Cairo it is 95 pounds, in Syria about 503 pounds.

Tapoa tafa (): A small carnivorous marsupial (Phascogale penicillata) having long, soft fur, and a very long tail with a tuft of long hairs at the end; -- called also brush-tailed phascogale.

Motmot (n.): Any one of several species of long-tailed, passerine birds of the genus Momotus, having a strong serrated beak. In most of the species the two long middle tail feathers are racket-shaped at the tip, when mature. The bird itself is said by some writers to trim them into this shape. They feed on insects, reptiles, and fruit, and are found from Mexico to Brazil. The name is derived from its note.

Kalasie (n.): A long-tailed monkey of Borneo (Semnopithecus rubicundus). It has a tuft of long hair on the head.

Long (superl.): Drawn out or extended in time; continued through a considerable tine, or to a great length; as, a long series of events; a long debate; a long drama; a long history; a long book.

Hundredweight (n.): A denomination of weight, containing 100, 112, or 120 pounds avoirdupois, according to differing laws or customs. By the legal standard of England it is 112 pounds. In most of the United States, both in practice and by law, it is 100 pounds avoirdupois, the corresponding ton of 2,000 pounds, sometimes called the short ton, being the legal ton.

Late (v.): Not long past; happening not long ago; recent; as, the late rains; we have received late intelligence.

Rat-tailed (a.): Having a long, tapering tail like that of a rat.

Ragamuffin (n.): The long-tailed titmouse.

Hareld (n.): The long-tailed duck.

Prinpriddle (n.): The long-tailed titmouse.

Sarcelle (n.): The old squaw, or long-tailed duck.

Phatagin (n.): The long-tailed pangolin (Manis tetradactyla); -- called also ipi.

Ovenbird (n.): In England, sometimes applied to the willow warbler, and to the long-tailed titmouse.

Pokebag (n.): The European long-tailed titmouse; -- called also poke-pudding.

Lungoor (n.): A long-tailed monkey (Semnopithecus schislaceus), from the mountainous districts of India.

Guenon (n.): One of several long-tailed Oriental monkeys, of the genus Cercocebus, as the green monkey and grivet.

Wire-tailed (a.): Having some or all of the tail quills terminated in a long, slender, pointed shaft, without a web or barbules.

Margay (n.): An American wild cat (Felis tigrina), ranging from Mexico to Brazil. It is spotted with black. Called also long-tailed cat.

Long (superl.): Extended to any specified measure; of a specified length; as, a span long; a yard long; a mile long, that is, extended to the measure of a mile, etc.

Quarter (n.): The fourth of a hundred-weight, being 25 or 28 pounds, according as the hundredweight is reckoned at 100 or 112 pounds.

Fork-tailed (a.): Having the outer tail feathers longer than the median ones; swallow-tailed; -- said of many birds.

Soulili (n.): A long-tailed, crested Javan monkey (Semnopithecus mitratus). The head, the crest, and the upper surface of the tail, are black.

Daggle-tailed (a.): Having the lower ends of garments defiled by trailing in mire or filth; draggle-tailed.

Candy (n.): A weight, at Madras 500 pounds, at Bombay 560 pounds.

Fan-tailed (a.): Having an expanded, or fan-shaped, tail; as, the fan-tailed pigeon.

Dag-tailed (a.): Daggle-tailed; having the tail clogged with daglocks.

Late (v.): Existing or holding some position not long ago, but not now; lately deceased, departed, or gone out of office; as, the late bishop of London; the late administration.

Patas (n.): A West African long-tailed monkey (Cercopithecus ruber); the red monkey.

Racket-tailed (a.): Having long and spatulate, or racket-shaped, tail feathers.

Like to add another meaning or definition of high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value.

Meaning of long-tailed 'un/long-tailed finnip

long-tailed 'un/long-tailed finnip means: high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value.

Meaning of fin/finn/finny/finnif/finnip/finnup/finnio/finnif

fin/finn/finny/finnif/finnip/finnup/finnio/finnif means: five pounds (£5), from the early 1800s. There are other spelling variations based on the same theme, all derived from the German and Yiddish (European/Hebrew mixture) funf, meaning five, more precisely spelled fünf. A 'double-finnif' (or double-fin, etc) means ten pounds; 'half-a-fin' (half-a-finnip, etc) would have been two pounds ten shillings (equal to £2.50).

Meaning of Long-Tailed

Long-Tailed means:     A banknote worth more than 5 pounds is said to be "long tailed"

Meaning of fiver

fiver means: five pounds (£5), from the mid-1800s. More rarely from the early-mid 1900s fiver could also mean five thousand pounds, but arguably it remains today the most widely used slang term for five pounds.

Meaning of oner

oner means: (pronounced 'wunner'), commonly now meaning one hundred pounds; sometimes one thousand pounds, depending on context. In the 1800s a oner was normally a shilling, and in the early 1900s a oner was one pound.

Meaning of bice/byce

bice/byce means: two shillings (2/-) or two pounds or twenty pounds - probably from the French bis, meaning twice, which suggests usage is older than the 1900s first recorded and referenced by dictionary sources. Bice could also occur in conjunction with other shilling slang, where the word bice assumes the meaning 'two', as in 'a bice of deaners', pronounced 'bicerdeaners', and with other money slang, for example bice of tenners, pronounced 'bicertenners', meaning twenty pounds.

Meaning of Broomtail

Broomtail means: A long, bushy-tailed range mare, usually unbroken. Also called a "broomie."

Meaning of carpet

carpet means: three pounds (£3) or three hundred pounds (£300), or sometimes thirty pounds (£30). This has confusing and convoluted origins, from as early as the late 1800s: It seems originally to have been a slang term for a three month prison sentence, based on the following: that 'carpet bag' was cockney rhyming slang for a 'drag', which was generally used to describe a three month sentence; also that in the prison workshops it supposedly took ninety days to produce a certain regulation-size piece of carpet; and there is also a belief that prisoners used to be awarded the luxury of a piece of carpet for their cell after three year's incarceration. The term has since the early 1900s been used by bookmakers and horse-racing, where carpet refers to odds of three-to-one, and in car dealing, where it refers to an amount of £300.

Meaning of cock and hen

cock and hen means: ten pounds (thanks N Shipperley). The ten pound meaning of cock and hen is 20th century rhyming slang. Cock and hen - also cockerel and hen - has carried the rhyming slang meaning for the number ten for longer. Its transfer to ten pounds logically grew more popular through the inflationary 1900s as the ten pound amount and banknote became more common currency in people's wages and wallets, and therefore language. Cock and hen also gave raise to the variations cockeren, cockeren and hen, hen, and the natural rhyming slang short version, cock - all meaning ten pounds.

Meaning of Plates

Plates means: The weights that you put on an Olympic dumbell, specifically a 45 pound weight. Smaller weights are called quarters (25 pounds), dimes (10 pounds), and nickels (5 pounds).

Meaning of quarter

quarter means: five shillings (5/-) from the 1800s, meaning a quarter of a pound. More recently (1900s) the slang 'a quarter' has transfered to twenty-five pounds.

Meaning of smackers/smackeroos

smackers/smackeroos means: pounds (or dollars) - in recent times not usually used in referring to a single £1 or a low amount, instead usually a hundred or several hundreds, but probably not several thousands, when grand would be preferred. Smackers (1920s) and smackeroos (1940s) are probably US extensions of the earlier English slang smack/smacks (1800s) meaning a pound note/notes, which Cassells slang dictionary suggests might be derived from the notion of smacking notes down onto a table.

Meaning of nicker

nicker means: a pound (£1). Not pluralised for a number of pounds, eg., 'It cost me twenty nicker..' From the early 1900s, London slang, precise origin unknown. Possibly connected to the use of nickel in the minting of coins, and to the American slang use of nickel to mean a $5 dollar note, which at the late 1800s was valued not far from a pound. In the US a nickel is more commonly a five cent coin. A nicker bit is a one pound coin, and London cockney rhyming slang uses the expression 'nicker bits' to describe a case of diarrhoea.

Meaning of bar

bar means: a pound, from the late 1800s, and earlier a sovereign, probably from Romany gypsy 'bauro' meaning heavy or big, and also influenced by allusion to the iron bars use as trading currency used with Africans, plus a possible reference to the custom of casting of precious metal in bars.

Meaning of Pipe the Side

Pipe the Side means: A salute performed with a Boatswain's Call when an honoured visitor or a Flag Officer comes aboard the ship. To be done properly it should be 12 seconds long, and is formed by a low note, then a four second high note, and closing with another low note. The transitions between low and high should be very smooth. To accomplish this, the sailor must take a very long deep breath prior to beginning; failure to do so will cause the pipe to be abruptly cut short. The side is also piped for Royalty, the Accused when entering a Court Martial and for the Officer of the Guard (When the Guard is formed up).

Meaning of LONG UN

LONG UN means: Long un is British slang for pounds sterling. Long un was old British slang for pounds sterling.

Meaning of nevis/neves

nevis/neves means: seven pounds (£7), 20th century backslang, and earlier, 1800s (usually as 'nevis gens') seven shillings (7/-).

Meaning of Long Ton

Long Ton means: 2,240 pounds (1016.05 kilograms)

Meaning of deuce

deuce means: two pounds, and much earlier (from the 1600s) tuppence (two old pence, 2d), from the French deus and Latin duos meaning two (which also give us the deuce term in tennis, meaning two points needed to win).

Meaning of monkey

monkey means: five hundred pounds (£500). Probably London slang from the early 1800s. Origin unknown. Like the 'pony' meaning £25, it is suggested by some that the association derives from Indian rupee banknotes featuring the animal.

Meaning of Cantarro

Cantarro means: A weight used in southern Europe and East for heavy articles. It varies in different localities; thus, at Rome it is nearly 75 pounds, in Sardinia nearly 94 pounds, in Cairo it is 95 pounds, in Syria about 503 pounds.

Meaning of Tapoa tafa

Tapoa tafa means: A small carnivorous marsupial (Phascogale penicillata) having long, soft fur, and a very long tail with a tuft of long hairs at the end; -- called also brush-tailed phascogale.

Meaning of Motmot

Motmot means: Any one of several species of long-tailed, passerine birds of the genus Momotus, having a strong serrated beak. In most of the species the two long middle tail feathers are racket-shaped at the tip, when mature. The bird itself is said by some writers to trim them into this shape. They feed on insects, reptiles, and fruit, and are found from Mexico to Brazil. The name is derived from its note.

Meaning of Kalasie

Kalasie means: A long-tailed monkey of Borneo (Semnopithecus rubicundus). It has a tuft of long hair on the head.

Meaning of Long

Long means: Drawn out or extended in time; continued through a considerable tine, or to a great length; as, a long series of events; a long debate; a long drama; a long history; a long book.

Meaning of Hundredweight

Hundredweight means: A denomination of weight, containing 100, 112, or 120 pounds avoirdupois, according to differing laws or customs. By the legal standard of England it is 112 pounds. In most of the United States, both in practice and by law, it is 100 pounds avoirdupois, the corresponding ton of 2,000 pounds, sometimes called the short ton, being the legal ton.

Meaning of Late

Late means: Not long past; happening not long ago; recent; as, the late rains; we have received late intelligence.

Meaning of Rat-tailed

Rat-tailed means: Having a long, tapering tail like that of a rat.

Meaning of Ragamuffin

Ragamuffin means: The long-tailed titmouse.

Meaning of Hareld

Hareld means: The long-tailed duck.

Meaning of Prinpriddle

Prinpriddle means: The long-tailed titmouse.

Meaning of Sarcelle

Sarcelle means: The old squaw, or long-tailed duck.

Meaning of Phatagin

Phatagin means: The long-tailed pangolin (Manis tetradactyla); -- called also ipi.

Meaning of Ovenbird

Ovenbird means: In England, sometimes applied to the willow warbler, and to the long-tailed titmouse.

Meaning of Pokebag

Pokebag means: The European long-tailed titmouse; -- called also poke-pudding.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Concretional

Concretional means: Concretionary.

Meaning of Groundsel

Groundsel means: Alt. of Groundsill

Meaning of Hennes

Hennes means: Hence.

Meaning of Raff

Raff means: A promiscuous heap; a jumble; a large quantity; lumber; refuse.

Meaning of Sole

Sole means: The bottom of a shoe or boot, or the piece of leather which constitutes the bottom.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of ENFORCER

ENFORCER means: Enforcer is British slang for a sledgehammer, a battering ram.

Meaning of FAT CITY

FAT CITY means: Fat city is Black−American slang for a fine state of affairs.

Meaning of plonker

plonker means: Noun. 1. A penis. 2. Fool, idiot, a despicable person.

Meaning of CHILLUM

CHILLUM means: pipe for smoking cannabis

Meaning of SPOTTER

SPOTTER means: Spy, company man assigned to snoop around and check on employees

Tags: Slang Meaning of high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value.. The slang definition of high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value.? Please, add a definition of high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value. if you did not find one from a search of high value note, from the 1800s and in use to the late 1900s. Earlier 'long-tailed finnip' meant more specifically ten pounds, since a finnip was five pounds (see fin/finny/finnip) from Yiddish funf meaning five. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value..

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