Slang meaning of NURSERY RHYMES

NURSERY RHYMES means: Nursery rhymes is London Cockney rhyming slang for the Times newspaper.

What is the slang meaning/definition of NURSERY RHYMES ?

NURSERY RHYMES means: Nursery rhymes is London Cockney rhyming slang for the Times newspaper.

Slang definition of NURSERY RHYMES

NURSERY RHYMES means: Nursery rhymes is London Cockney rhyming slang for the Times newspaper.

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More meanings / definitions of Nursery rhymes is London Cockney rhyming slang for the Times newspaper. or words, sentences containing Nursery rhymes is London Cockney rhyming slang for the Times newspaper.?

Rhymery (n.): The art or habit of making rhymes; rhyming; -- in contempt.

Female rhymes (): double rhymes, or rhymes (called in French feminine rhymes because they end in e weak, or feminine) in which two syllables, an accented and an unaccented one, correspond at the end of each line.

Cockney (n.): A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Nursery (n.): That which forms and educates; as, commerce is the nursery of seamen.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Triweekly (a.): Occurring or appearing three times a week; thriceweekly; as, a triweekly newspaper.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Journal (a.): A newspaper published daily; by extension, a weekly newspaper or any periodical publication, giving an account of passing events, the proceedings and memoirs of societies, etc.

Plague (n.): An acute malignant contagious fever, that often prevails in Egypt, Syria, and Turkey, and has at times visited the large cities of Europe with frightful mortality; hence, any pestilence; as, the great London plague.

Flat-cap (n.): A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

Installment (n.): A portion of a debt, or sum of money, which is divided into portions that are made payable at different times. Payment by installment is payment by parts at different times, the amounts and times being often definitely stipulated.

Rhyming (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Rhyme

Ancient (a.): Old; that happened or existed in former times, usually at a great distance of time; belonging to times long past; specifically applied to the times before the fall of the Roman empire; -- opposed to modern; as, ancient authors, literature, history; ancient days.

Parlor (n.): In large private houses, a sitting room for the family and for familiar guests, -- a room for less formal uses than the drawing-room. Esp., in modern times, the dining room of a house having few apartments, as a London house, where the dining parlor is usually on the ground floor.

Triplet (n.): Three verses rhyming together.

Cockneys (pl. ): of Cockney

Cokenay (n.): A cockney.

Cockney (a.): Of or relating to, or like, cockneys.

Quatrain (n.): A stanza of four lines rhyming alternately.

Cockneyism (n.): The characteristics, manners, or dialect, of a cockney.

Cockney (n.): An effeminate person; a spoilt child.

Cockneyfy (v. t.): To form with the manners or character of a cockney.

Chime (n.): To make a rude correspondence of sounds; to jingle, as in rhyming.

Bowbell (n.): One born within hearing distance of Bow-bells; a cockney.

Nursery (n.): The act of nursing.

Nurseries (pl. ): of Nursery

Nursery (n.): That which is nursed.

Sevenfold (a.): Repeated seven times; having seven thicknesses; increased to seven times the size or amount.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Nursery rhymes is London Cockney rhyming slang for the Times newspaper.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Nursery rhymes is London Cockney rhyming slang for the Times newspaper.

Meaning of NURSERY RHYMES

NURSERY RHYMES means: Nursery rhymes is London Cockney rhyming slang for the Times newspaper.

Meaning of NURSERY RHYME

NURSERY RHYME means: Nursery rhyme is London Cockney rhyming slang for crime.

Meaning of currant bun

currant bun means: Noun. 1. The sun. Cockney rhyming slang. 2. The Sun newspaper. A tabloid newspaper that adopted the rhyming slang expression for its own use. 3. Son. Rhyming slang. 4. A protestant or commonly also a supporter of Rangers FC. Rhyming slang for 'hun'. See 'hun'. [Mainly Glasgow use]

Meaning of IN AND OUT

IN AND OUT means: In and out is British slang for sexual intercourse.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for snout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for spout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for sprout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for stout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for tout.

Meaning of BUBBLE AND SQUEAK

BUBBLE AND SQUEAK means: Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for beak (a magistrate). Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Greek.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for speak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for weak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a week.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for to urinate (leak).

Meaning of JACK AND JILL

JACK AND JILL means: Jack and Jill is British slang for a male and female police officer working as a partnership. Jack andJill is London Cockney rhyming slang for hill.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for bill.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for till.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for pill.

Meaning of JACK AND VERA

JACK AND VERA means: Jack and Vera is London Cockney rhyming slang for the Daily Mirror newspaper.

Meaning of LINEN DRAPER

LINEN DRAPER means: Linen draper is London Cockney rhyming slang for paper (newspaper).

Meaning of HARRY TATE

HARRY TATE means: Harry Tate is bingo slang for eight.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for late.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for plate.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for a state of agitation or nervousness (state). HarryTate is London Cockney rhyming slang for weight.Harry Tate is British merchant navy slang for mate.

Meaning of DUKE OF YORK

DUKE OF YORK means: Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for chalk. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for cork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for fork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for pork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for talk. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for walk.

Meaning of DAILY MAIL

DAILY MAIL means: Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for tale. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for ale. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for bail. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for nail.Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for the backside, buttocks (tail). Daily Mail is British slang for the sex.

Meaning of CAPTAIN GRIMES

CAPTAIN GRIMES means: Captain Grimes is British rhyming slang for the Times newspaper.

Meaning of TEAPOT LID

TEAPOT LID means: Tewapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for a child (kid).Teapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for one pound sterling (quid).Teapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Jew (Yid).

Meaning of BREAD AND BUTTER

BREAD AND BUTTER means: Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for gutter. Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for nutter. Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for putter. Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for shutter. Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for stutter.

Meaning of SAUSAGE ROLL

SAUSAGE ROLL means: Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for unemployment (dole). Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for a pole.Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Polish person (Pole). Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for poll.Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for the head (poll).

Meaning of RORY O'MORE

RORY O'MORE means: Rory O'More is London Cockney rhyming slang for floor. Rory O'More is London Cockney rhyming slang for door. Rory O'More is London Cockney rhyming slang for poor. Rory O'More is London Cockney rhyming slang for whorer.

Meaning of NOAH'S ARK

NOAH'S ARK means: Noah's ark is London Cockney rhyming slang for park. Noah's ark is London Cockney rhyming slang for nark. Noah's ark is London Cockney rhyming slang for dark. Noah's ark is London Cockney rhyming slang for lark.

Meaning of LOLLIPOP

LOLLIPOP means: Lollipop is British slang for the penis.Lollipop is London Cockney rhyming slang for to inform on someone (shop).Lollipop is London Cockney rhyming slang for drop.Lollipop is London Cockney rhyming slang for the police (cop).

Meaning of BAR OF SOAP

BAR OF SOAP means: Bar of soap is London Cockney rhyming slang for drugs (dope). Bar of soap is London Cockney rhyming slang for the Pope.Bar of soap is London Cockney rhyming slang for rope.Bar of soap is London Cockney rhyming slang for an idiot (dope).

Meaning of HOW D'YOU DO

HOW D'YOU DO means: How d'you do is British slang for a commotion or brawl. How d'you do is London Cockney rhyming slang for shoe.How d'you do is London Cockney rhyming slang for trouble, agitation (stew).

Meaning of Rhymery

Rhymery means: The art or habit of making rhymes; rhyming; -- in contempt.

Meaning of Female rhymes

Female rhymes means: double rhymes, or rhymes (called in French feminine rhymes because they end in e weak, or feminine) in which two syllables, an accented and an unaccented one, correspond at the end of each line.

Meaning of Cockney

Cockney means: A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Nursery

Nursery means: That which forms and educates; as, commerce is the nursery of seamen.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Meaning of Triweekly

Triweekly means: Occurring or appearing three times a week; thriceweekly; as, a triweekly newspaper.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Meaning of Journal

Journal means: A newspaper published daily; by extension, a weekly newspaper or any periodical publication, giving an account of passing events, the proceedings and memoirs of societies, etc.

Meaning of Plague

Plague means: An acute malignant contagious fever, that often prevails in Egypt, Syria, and Turkey, and has at times visited the large cities of Europe with frightful mortality; hence, any pestilence; as, the great London plague.

Meaning of Flat-cap

Flat-cap means: A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

Meaning of Installment

Installment means: A portion of a debt, or sum of money, which is divided into portions that are made payable at different times. Payment by installment is payment by parts at different times, the amounts and times being often definitely stipulated.

Meaning of Rhyming

Rhyming means: of Rhyme

Meaning of Ancient

Ancient means: Old; that happened or existed in former times, usually at a great distance of time; belonging to times long past; specifically applied to the times before the fall of the Roman empire; -- opposed to modern; as, ancient authors, literature, history; ancient days.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Breach

Breach means: A breaking out upon; an assault.

Meaning of Farreation

Farreation means: Same as Confarreation.

Meaning of Flippant

Flippant means: Of smooth, fluent, and rapid speech; speaking with ease and rapidity; having a voluble tongue; talkative.

Meaning of Smither

Smither means: Fragments; atoms; finders.

Meaning of Tartronate

Tartronate means: A salt of tartronic acid.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of SPARE−TYRE

SPARE−TYRE means: Spare−tyre is slang for a roll of fat around ones midrift.

Meaning of dolt

dolt means: A stupid or foolish person. Simon is a dolt who though Finland was an aquarium.

Meaning of Switch

Switch means: to turn on someone.

Meaning of can (1)

can (1) means: to reject or criticize something or someone

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