Definition of Venture

Venture n. means: An undertaking of chance or danger; the risking of something upon an event which can not be foreseen with certainty; a hazard; a risk; a speculation.

What is the meaning/definition of Venture ?

Venture n. means: An undertaking of chance or danger; the risking of something upon an event which can not be foreseen with certainty; a hazard; a risk; a speculation.

Meaning of Venture

Venture (n.) means: An undertaking of chance or danger; the risking of something upon an event which can not be foreseen with certainty; a hazard; a risk; a speculation.

More meanings / definitions of Venture or words, sentences containing Venture?

Venture (v. t.): To put or send on a venture or chance; as, to venture a horse to the West Indies.

Venture (v. i.): To make a venture; to run a hazard or risk; to take the chances.

Set (n.): That which is staked; a wager; a venture; a stake; hence, a game at venture.

Presume (v. i.): To venture, go, or act, by an assumption of leave or authority not granted; to go beyond what is warranted by the circumstances of the case; to venture beyond license; to take liberties; -- often with on or upon before the ground of confidence.

Venture (v. t.): To expose to hazard; to risk; to hazard; as, to venture one's person in a balloon.

Ventured (imp. & p. p.): of Venture

Think (v. t.): To presume; to venture.

Venturing (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Venture

Run (v. i.): To put at hazard; to venture; to risk.

Auntre (v. t.): To venture; to dare.

Coadventure (v. i.): To share in a venture.

Undertake (v. i.): To venture; to hazard.

Jump (n.): An effort; an attempt; a venture.

Hazard (n.): To venture to incur, or bring on.

Trust (n.): To risk; to venture confidently.

Adventure (n.): To venture upon; to run the risk of; to dare.

Venture (v. t.): To confide in; to rely on; to trust.

Chance (v. t.): To take the chances of; to venture upon; -- usually with it as object.

Adventure (n.): To risk, or hazard; jeopard; to venture.

Aventre (v. t.): To thrust forward (at a venture), as a spear.

Cast (n.): A throw of dice; hence, a chance or venture.

Venture (v. i.): To hazard one's self; to have the courage or presumption to do, undertake, or say something; to dare.

Pool (n.): Any gambling or commercial venture in which several persons join.

Dare (v. t.): To have courage for; to attempt courageously; to venture to do or to undertake.

Venture (n.): The thing put to hazard; a stake; a risk; especially, something sent to sea in trade.

Enterprise (v. t.): To undertake; to begin and attempt to perform; to venture upon.

Wage (v. t.): To expose one's self to, as a risk; to incur, as a danger; to venture; to hazard.

Venture (n.): An event that is not, or can not be, foreseen; an accident; chance; hap; contingency; luck.

Hazard (n.): To expose to the operation of chance; to put in danger of loss or injury; to venture; to risk.

Dare (v. i.): To have adequate or sufficient courage for any purpose; to be bold or venturesome; not to be afraid; to venture.

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Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Venture

Meaning of VC

VC means: Venture Capital

Meaning of Venture

Venture means: An enterprise in which there is a risk of loss.

Meaning of GO FOR BROKE

GO FOR BROKE means: Go for broke is slang for to risk everything in a gambling or other venture.

Meaning of pissed

pissed means: adj drunk. Brits do not use it alone as a contraction of “pissed off,” which means that Americans saying things like “I was really pissed with my boss at work today” leaves Brits wide-eyed. go out on the - venture out drinking. taking the - poking fun at someone. May well be a throwback to the U.S. use of the word.

Meaning of nut

nut means: n 1. a. A crazy or eccentric person. b. An enthusiast; a buff: a movie nut. 2. The human head. 3. The cost of launching a business venture. 4. A testicle. v. Idioms:bust (one's) nut 1. To eject semen in orgasm. 2. To orgasm.nutted 1. To eject semen in orgasm. 2. To orgasm.

Meaning of Wench

Wench means: The word wench literally means young woman or girl. From today's perspective (and for the most part, even in the 18th century) it was used despairingly. The word wench if often used to describe women who worked in taverns and/or brothels. For the most part modifiers were actually added to the word to specify the woman's profession. A female serving patrons of an establishment were serving wenches. At other times it was used to describe any kind of female of the rustic working class (laborers, the poor). When referring to prostitutes or mistresses the word wench would be modified with a noun such as common wench, light wench, wench of the stews, or wanton wench. The word whore was also commonly used to describe prostitutes. Wench dates back to around 1290 when is word that simply meant a young girl or woman. At times it was used as a term of endearment used chiefly in addressing a daughter, wife, or sweetheart.(Far from today's idea of the word) In most movies and works of literary fiction, the wench is pictured as often pretty, scantily dressed and enjoying her chosen profession. While some did fit this description most serving wenches worked long hours, many were widows or among the lowest class of working poor. Their harsh life usually led to poor health and a short life. Often a serving wench would have no choice but to also venture into prostitution in order to afford food and housing. The life of a prostitute is often glamorized in the movies in reality in often led longer work hours, unspeakable diseases, physical abuse, and an even shorter life. In some case, wanton wenches (prostitutes) were forced into the profession. Female African slaves and in some cases white women were forced into the trade. While "white slavery" or forced prostitution was less common that forced African slavery did occur. Despite the portrayal of prostitution in such movies and Pirates of the Caribbean and older movies such as The Black Swan, the life of a tavern wench or prostitute in the 18th century was a miserable intolerable affair. 18th Century Serving Wench. If she were selling more than ale, she could remove the scarf around her neck to show here "wares" and use her apron from a pillow.

Meaning of 18th Century Serving Wench. If she were selling more than ale, she could remove the scarf around her neck to show here "wares" and use her apron from a pillow.

18th Century Serving Wench. If she were selling more than ale, she could remove the scarf around her neck to show here "wares" and use her apron from a pillow. means: Wench: The word wench literally means young woman or girl. From today's perspective (and for the most part, even in the 18th century) it was used despairingly. The word wench if often used to describe women who worked in taverns and/or brothels. For the most part modifiers were actually added to the word to specify the woman's profession. A female serving patrons of an establishment were serving wenches. At other times it was used to describe any kind of female of the rustic working class (laborers, the poor). When referring to prostitutes or mistresses the word wench would be modified with a noun such as common wench, light wench, wench of the stews, or wanton wench. The word whore was also commonly used to describe prostitutes. Wench dates back to around 1290 when is word that simply meant a young girl or woman. At times it was used as a term of endearment used chiefly in addressing a daughter, wife, or sweetheart.(Far from today's idea of the word) In most movies and works of literary fiction, the wench is pictured as often pretty, scantily dressed and enjoying her chosen profession. While some did fit this description most serving wenches worked long hours, many were widows or among the lowest class of working poor. Their harsh life usually led to poor health and a short life. Often a serving wench would have no choice but to also venture into prostitution in order to afford food and housing. The life of a prostitute is often glamorized in the movies in reality in often led longer work hours, unspeakable diseases, physical abuse, and an even shorter life. In some case, wanton wenches (prostitutes) were forced into the profession. Female African slaves and in some cases white women were forced into the trade. While "white slavery" or forced prostitution was less common that forced African slavery did occur. Despite the portrayal of prostitution in such movies and Pirates of the Caribbean and older movies such as The Black Swan, the life of a tavern wench or prostitute in the 18th century was a miserable intolerable affair.

Meaning of Venture

Venture means: To put or send on a venture or chance; as, to venture a horse to the West Indies.

Meaning of Venture

Venture means: To make a venture; to run a hazard or risk; to take the chances.

Meaning of Set

Set means: That which is staked; a wager; a venture; a stake; hence, a game at venture.

Meaning of Presume

Presume means: To venture, go, or act, by an assumption of leave or authority not granted; to go beyond what is warranted by the circumstances of the case; to venture beyond license; to take liberties; -- often with on or upon before the ground of confidence.

Meaning of Venture

Venture means: To expose to hazard; to risk; to hazard; as, to venture one's person in a balloon.

Meaning of Ventured

Ventured means: of Venture

Meaning of Think

Think means: To presume; to venture.

Meaning of Venturing

Venturing means: of Venture

Meaning of Run

Run means: To put at hazard; to venture; to risk.

Meaning of Auntre

Auntre means: To venture; to dare.

Meaning of Coadventure

Coadventure means: To share in a venture.

Meaning of Undertake

Undertake means: To venture; to hazard.

Meaning of Jump

Jump means: An effort; an attempt; a venture.

Meaning of Hazard

Hazard means: To venture to incur, or bring on.

Meaning of Trust

Trust means: To risk; to venture confidently.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Emanatively

Emanatively means: By an emanation.

Meaning of Libel

Libel means: Any defamatory writing; a lampoon; a satire.

Meaning of Organoscopy

Organoscopy means: Phrenology.

Meaning of Pile

Pile means: A vertical series of alternate disks of two dissimilar metals, as copper and zinc, laid up with disks of cloth or paper moistened with acid water between them, for producing a current of electricity; -- commonly called Volta's pile, voltaic pile, or galvanic pile.

Meaning of Twire-pipe

Twire-pipe means: A vagabond musician.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of take the biscuit

take the biscuit means: Vrb phrs. To beat all competition, to take all the honours, usually said ironically or with surprise. {Informal}

Meaning of floozy

floozy means: A woman of loose morals Juan Carlos came to the party with some floozy he picked up at a bar.

Meaning of Frog And Toad

Frog And Toad means: Road

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