Slang dictionary, find a slang word, phrase and meanings

Definition of Kent bugle

Kent bugle means: A curved bugle, having six finger keys or stops, by means of which the performer can play upon every key in the musical scale; -- called also keyed bugle, and key bugle.

What is the meaning/definition of Kent bugle ?

Kent bugle means: A curved bugle, having six finger keys or stops, by means of which the performer can play upon every key in the musical scale; -- called also keyed bugle, and key bugle.

Meaning of Kent bugle

Kent bugle means: A curved bugle, having six finger keys or stops, by means of which the performer can play upon every key in the musical scale; -- called also keyed bugle, and key bugle.

More meanings / definitions of Kent bugle or words, sentences containing Kent bugle?

Kent bugle (): A curved bugle, having six finger keys or stops, by means of which the performer can play upon every key in the musical scale; -- called also keyed bugle, and key bugle.

Bugle (n.): A copper instrument of the horn quality of tone, shorter and more conical that the trumpet, sometimes keyed; formerly much used in military bands, very rarely in the orchestra; now superseded by the cornet; -- called also the Kent bugle.

Bugle horn (): A bugle.

Turnwrest (n.): Designating a cumbersome style of plow used in England, esp. in Kent.

Gavelet (n.): An ancient special kind of cessavit used in Kent and London for the recovery of rent.

Jutes (n. pl.): Jutlanders; one of the Low German tribes, a portion of which settled in Kent, England, in the 5th century.

Bugle (a.): Jet black.

Bugle (n.): A horn used by hunters.

Bugler (n.): One who plays on a bugle.

Mot (n.): A note or brief strain on a bugle.

Bugle (n.): A sort of wild ox; a buffalo.

Virole (n.): A ring surrounding a bugle or hunting horn.

Foreland (n.): A promontory or cape; a headland; as, the North and South Foreland in Kent, England.

Wealdish (a.): Of or pertaining to a weald, esp. to the weald in the county of Kent, England.

Bugle (n.): An elongated glass bead, of various colors, though commonly black.

Lathe (n.): Formerly, a part or division of a county among the Anglo-Saxons. At present it consists of four or five hundreds, and is confined to the county of Kent.

Bugle (n.): A plant of the genus Ajuga of the Mint family, a native of the Old World.

Assembly (n.): A beat of the drum or sound of the bugle as a signal to troops to assemble.

Recall (n.): A call on the trumpet, bugle, or drum, by which soldiers are recalled from duty, labor, etc.

Call (n.): A signal, as on a drum, bugle, trumpet, or pipe, to summon soldiers or sailors to duty.

Reveille (n.): The beat of drum, or bugle blast, about break of day, to give notice that it is time for the soldiers to rise, and for the sentinels to forbear challenging.

Retreat (n.): A signal given in the army or navy, by the beat of a drum or the sounding of trumpet or bugle, at sunset (when the roll is called), or for retiring from action.

Gavelkind (n.): A tenure by which land descended from the father to all his sons in equal portions, and the land of a brother, dying without issue, descended equally to his brothers. It still prevails in the county of Kent.

Tattoo (n.): A beat of drum, or sound of a trumpet or bugle, at night, giving notice to soldiers to retreat, or to repair to their quarters in garrison, or to their tents in camp.

Retire (n.): A call sounded on a bugle, announcing to skirmishers that they are to retire, or fall back.

Mouthpiece (n.): The part of a musical or other instrument to which the mouth is applied in using it; as, the mouthpiece of a bugle, or of a tobacco pipe.

Viroled (a.): Furnished with a virole or viroles; -- said of a horn or a bugle when the rings are of different tincture from the rest of the horn.

Alert (n.): An alarm from a real or threatened attack; a sudden attack; also, a bugle sound to give warning.

Bugle horn (): A drinking vessel made of horn.

Call (n.): The act of calling; -- usually with the voice, but often otherwise, as by signs, the sound of some instrument, or by writing; a summons; an entreaty; an invitation; as, a call for help; the bugle's call.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Kent bugle?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Kent bugle

Meaning of BUGLE

BUGLE means: Bugle is slang for the nose.

Meaning of BEEF BUGLE

BEEF BUGLE means: Beef bugle is Australian slang for the penis.

Meaning of CLARK KENT

CLARK KENT means: Clark Kent is London Cockney rhyming slang for corrupt (bent).

Meaning of Duke of Kent

Duke of Kent means: Rent. I can't afford to pay the Duke of Kent this week

Meaning of DUKE OF KENT

DUKE OF KENT means: Duke of Kent is London Cockney rhyming slang for bent. Duke of Kent is London Cockney rhyming slang for rent.

Meaning of bugle

bugle means: Cocaine

Meaning of bugle

bugle means: Noun. Cocaine.

Meaning of Duke Of Kent

Duke Of Kent means: Rent

Meaning of gavver

gavver means: Noun. A policeman/woman. [Kent use/ Orig. Romany]

Meaning of FLORENCE AND DOUGAL

FLORENCE AND DOUGAL means: Florence and Dougal is London Cockney rhyming slang for the nose (bugle).

Meaning of Hopping Pot

Hopping Pot means: Lot (Serving or share). That's your hopping mate. Meaning, that's all you get. this may have originated with Londoners who traveled to Kent and other districts to gather hops for beer

Meaning of duke

duke means: Noun. A homosexual. Rhyming slang on Duke of Kent meaning 'bent'. See 'bent'.

Meaning of pikey *

pikey * means: Noun. 1. A gypsy or traveller. 2. A vagrant. Derog. Adj. Of or relating to a gypsy or vagrant. Derog. * [Orig. South-east England/Kent use. Dialect]

Meaning of kakit squares

kakit squares means: It was only ever at the contributors junior school in Kent, and was named after Karen Kakit. She was the school fleabag, who bizarrely had left several years before he started there! The idea was, that the strange squares you get set into the floor of corridors, with the metal grid around them, were the squares, and if you stood on one you had fleas, unless of course, you had feynites when you were safe! You still felt a bit dirty then though, so it was best to jump over them!

Meaning of barmy

barmy means: adj idiotic. You might describe your father’s plan to pioneer the first civilian moon landing using nothing but stuff he’d collected from a junkyard as “barmy.” Well, unless the junkyard he had in mind was out the back of Cape Kennedy and he had funding from China. It may or may not derive from the fact that there was once a psychiatric hospital in a place called Barming, near Maidstone in Kent, England. It may equally easily come from an Old English word for yeast, “barm,” intended to imply that the brain is fermenting. As these competing etymologies seem equally plausible, it seems only sensible to settle the matter in an old-fashioned fistfight.

Meaning of grundy, 'undie grundy

grundy, 'undie grundy means: For one or more assailants to seize waistband of selected victim's underpants and pull up same (sharply) to cause maximum pain and distress. A horrible craze which briefly swept the secondary schools of northwest Kent The contributor had left school by the time this became "popular" but clearly recalls his mates' little brothers' obsession with the vicious practice. Also he distinctly remembers two of the blighters trying it on his "mucker" Simon, who was "hard and in the army", and getting a sound kicking for their pains. Comment from 'Wayne'who just wanted to add that this was commonplace in Essex (UK) in the earlier eighties. Being of slight build in 1980-1982 he was often the target of the Grundy, or sometimes called 'Undie Grundy'. He's seen people paraded round several feet in the air, only being carried by their pants. Not pleasant!

Meaning of charver, Chava

charver, Chava means: Used as 'He's a right little Charva'. Describes a group of youths usually described as 'townies' or 'kappa slappers' else where. Charvas typically wear things like Kappa tracksuits and Berghaus jackets, smoke Lambert and Butler cigarettes amongst other things, have hooped gold earrings, spit constantly and wear at least one gold sovereign ring (a gold band attached to the bottom of a gold sovereign coin) on each hand. Most people seem to grow out of 'charvadom' by their early twenties, although may still carry a few of the habits through to later life and will by then probably drive a souped-up XR2I, with blacked-out rear windows and a 5000 watt stereo system. Another trait common to the charva is a loud, slightly sarcastic, nasal laugh and slow 'can't really be bothered to talk' speech. Typical slang words that Charvas use are 'belta', 'mint' and 'waxa' all meaning good or great, with the prefix of 'pure' or 'total' this would mean really good (I couldn't be bothered to send seperate entries for these words, sorry). Another submission on this word goes as follows: In current usage here in Kent - primarily by teenagers as a term of abuse - as in "he's a right Chav." Describes someone who wears Reebok or Adidas trainers, gold jewellery and is likely to be a shop lifter. Girl Chavs wear big gold hoop earrings and like pop music (as opposed to rock, metal, grunge etc.) , Would be very interested to hear any feed back on this as this one word has made me feel like a very out of touch parent!! My daughter was bought an Adidas bag which she refused to use for fear of being called a "Chav". She then gave me the above description, and other teenagers I've asked have given the same with little variation. However, my husband (Kent born and bred) says when he was young the term 'Chav' was used as an affectionate term for a younger boy - certainly not as an insult as it is used now. It would appear that even those teenagers who dress as described are deeply offended by the word. (ed: both added verbatim - some feedback *would* be nice! I have the idea it is derived from an Indian/Pakistani word for 'friend' and would like to have some confirmation either way!) (ed: interesting comment from Vic) I followed a link to your site where it was explained that the expression, Charva, was a nineties thing. "Ow ya going, me old charva?" "Not bad. How's life as Cannon-fodder?" And so on. I miss him. He was a good bloke.

Meaning of Kent bugle

Kent bugle means: A curved bugle, having six finger keys or stops, by means of which the performer can play upon every key in the musical scale; -- called also keyed bugle, and key bugle.

Meaning of Bugle

Bugle means: A copper instrument of the horn quality of tone, shorter and more conical that the trumpet, sometimes keyed; formerly much used in military bands, very rarely in the orchestra; now superseded by the cornet; -- called also the Kent bugle.

Meaning of Bugle horn

Bugle horn means: A bugle.

Meaning of Turnwrest

Turnwrest means: Designating a cumbersome style of plow used in England, esp. in Kent.

Meaning of Gavelet

Gavelet means: An ancient special kind of cessavit used in Kent and London for the recovery of rent.

Meaning of Jutes

Jutes means: Jutlanders; one of the Low German tribes, a portion of which settled in Kent, England, in the 5th century.

Meaning of Bugle

Bugle means: Jet black.

Meaning of Bugle

Bugle means: A horn used by hunters.

Meaning of Bugler

Bugler means: One who plays on a bugle.

Meaning of Mot

Mot means: A note or brief strain on a bugle.

Meaning of Bugle

Bugle means: A sort of wild ox; a buffalo.

Meaning of Virole

Virole means: A ring surrounding a bugle or hunting horn.

Meaning of Foreland

Foreland means: A promontory or cape; a headland; as, the North and South Foreland in Kent, England.

Meaning of Wealdish

Wealdish means: Of or pertaining to a weald, esp. to the weald in the county of Kent, England.

Meaning of Bugle

Bugle means: An elongated glass bead, of various colors, though commonly black.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Lead

Lead means: To guide or conduct one's self in, through, or along (a certain course); hence, to proceed in the way of; to follow the path or course of; to pass; to spend. Also, to cause (one) to proceed or follow in (a certain course).

Meaning of Nasty

Nasty means: Offensively filthy; very dirty, foul, or defiled; disgusting; nauseous.

Meaning of Osmose

Osmose means: The tendency in fluids to mix, or become equably diffused, when in contact. It was first observed between fluids of differing densities, and as taking place through a membrane or an intervening porous structure. The more rapid flow from the thinner to the thicker fluid was then called endosmose, and the opposite, slower current, exosmose. Both are, however, results of the same force. Osmose may be regarded as a form of molecular attraction, allied to that of adhesion.

Meaning of Stretch

Stretch means: A continuous line or surface; a continuous space of time; as, grassy stretches of land.

Meaning of Ululant

Ululant means: Howling; wailing.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of blotto

blotto means: very drunk ‘At that stage I was blotto, mate.’

Meaning of UNOIT

UNOIT means: You Know It

Meaning of LA coke

LA coke means: ketamine. See K

Meaning of bottomboy-son

bottomboy-son means: Son is a term for the younger partner in a intergenerational relationships, the person who prefers a love partner much older than himself. In the leather or S/M community, someone who is usually a masochist or a submissive, relationship, the term "boy" usually translates into "bottom." "Bottom," in anal intercourse the man who penetrated, the term son has no relationship to the age of the person, it is not uncommon for a boy in the relationship to be older than his partner. A top "sons" could be old enough to be parther his father.

Meaning of Dicky Bird

Dicky Bird means: Word. He left without so much as a dicky.

Tags: Slang Meaning of Kent bugle. The slang definition of Kent bugle. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Kent bugle? Please, add a definition of Kent bugle if you did not find one from a search of Kent bugle.

Copyrights © 2016 LingoMash. All Rights Reserved.