Definition of March

March n. means: Hence: Measured and regular advance or movement, like that of soldiers moving in order; stately or deliberate walk; steady onward movement.

What is the meaning/definition of March ?

March n. means: Hence: Measured and regular advance or movement, like that of soldiers moving in order; stately or deliberate walk; steady onward movement.

Meaning of March

March (n.) means: Hence: Measured and regular advance or movement, like that of soldiers moving in order; stately or deliberate walk; steady onward movement.

More meanings / definitions of March or words, sentences containing March?

March (n.): The distance passed over in marching; as, an hour's march; a march of twenty miles.

Countermarch (v. i.): To march back, or to march in reversed order.

March-mad (a.): Extremely rash; foolhardy. See under March, the month.

March (n.): A piece of music designed or fitted to accompany and guide the movement of troops; a piece of music in the march form.

Straggle (v. t.): To wander from the direct course or way; to rove; to stray; to wander from the line of march or desert the line of battle; as, when troops are on the march, the men should not straggle.

Dismarch (v. i.): To march away.

Marched (imp. & p. p.): of March

Marching (p. pr. & vb. n.): of March

Marching (): a. & n., fr. March, v.

Gait (n.): A going; a walk; a march; a way.

Demarch (n.): March; walk; gait.

Troop (v. i.): To march on; to go forward in haste.

Overmarch (v. t. & i.): To march too far, or too much; to exhaust by marching.

March-ward (n.): A warden of the marches; a marcher.

March (n.): The third month of the year, containing thirty-one days.

Pannel (n.): A carriage for conveying a mortar and its bed, on a march.

Troop (n.): A particular roll of the drum; a quick march.

Trudge (v. i.): To walk or march with labor; to jog along; to move wearily.

Ram (n.): Aries, the sign of the zodiac which the sun enters about the 21st of March.

Outmarch (v. t.): To surpass in marching; to march faster than, or so as to leave behind.

Ides (n. pl.): The fifteenth day of March, May, July, and October, and the thirteenth day of the other months.

Vanguard (n.): The troops who march in front of an army; the advance guard; the van.

Double (a.): To pass around or by; to march or sail round, so as to reverse the direction of motion.

Parade (v. i.): To assemble in military order for evolutions and inspection; to form or march, as in review.

Minuteman (n.): A militiaman who was to be ready to march at a moment's notice; -- a term used in the American Revolution.

Aries (n.): The Ram; the first of the twelve signs in the zodiac, which the sun enters at the vernal equinox, about the 21st of March.

Cavalcade (n.): A procession of persons on horseback; a formal, pompous march of horsemen by way of parade.

Debouch (v. i.): To march out from a wood, defile, or other confined spot, into open ground; to issue.

Haversack (n.): A bag or case, usually of stout cloth, in which a soldier carries his rations when on a march; -- distinguished from knapsack.

Adar (n.): The twelfth month of the Hebrew ecclesiastical year, and the sixth of the civil. It corresponded nearly with March.

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Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to March

Meaning of Heart of Oak

Heart of Oak means: The official march of the Royal Canadian Navy. It is also the official march of several Commonwealth navies including the Royal Navy and the Royal New Zealand Navy. It was once the official march of the Royal Australian Navy, but has now been replaced by a new march. Originally written as an opera, it was composed by Dr. William Boyce. The words were written by the 18th-century English actor David Garrick. It was first performed on New Year's Eve, 1760.

Meaning of Mad as a March Hare

Mad as a March Hare means: Very angry.

Meaning of HR 5452

HR 5452 means: On March 23, 1975 a gay right bill was in the United States Congress, but was not pasted.

Meaning of dipping-time

dipping-time means: the period from March-April when young seals take to water

Meaning of Black Tot Day

Black Tot Day means: The name given to the last day on which the Royal Navy issued sailors with a daily rum ration, which was 31 July 1970. In the RCN, this day came two years later, on 30 March 1972.

Meaning of fair grunt

fair grunt means: n. an expression exclusively used nonchalantly by others to describe a death march, in hopes others will try it, fail, and revere them as bike gods.

Meaning of sticky

sticky means: Noun. A member of the official I.R.A., an Irish republican. E.g."The stickies protested against the proposed march by the Unionists." [Mainly army use/1970s]

Meaning of three-hour tour

three-hour tour means: n. a ride that looks like a piece of cake at the outset but turns out to be a death march. Derived from the theme song to "Gilligan's Island."

Meaning of Tot

Tot means: A rum ration consisting of a half-gill measure of Pusser's Rum. At one time, it was a daily issue on HMC Ships, however that tradition ened on 30 March 1972.

Meaning of Gay right bill

Gay right bill means: HR 5452, On March 23, 1975 a gay right bill was in the United States Congress, but was not pasted.

Meaning of yomp

yomp means: A "forced" march or run. An "army" term that came into use in schools after the Falklands War when the public was told "yomping" part of paratroopers training. In schools it was applied to cross country training.

Meaning of epic

epic means: n. a ride that must last for at least six hours and include at least three mechanicals that add at least an extra hour to the ride time. Epics are usually started with a statement like "the trail is buff, should only take three hours." Similar to death march.

Meaning of YOMP

YOMP means: Yomp is slang for to walk hard and with vigour.Yomp is military slang for march over difficult terrain with heavy equipment.

Meaning of TAB

TAB means: Tab is slang for tablet. Tab is slang for an ear.Tab is slang for a cigarette.Tab is slang for an elderly woman.Tab is Australian slang for a young woman or girl.Tab is theatre slang for a tableau curtain or one of its suspending loops.Tab is military slang for march over difficult terrain with heavy equipment.

Meaning of Equinoctial

Equinoctial means: The great circle on the celestial sphere in the plane of the earth's equator; also called the celestial equator. The sun is on the equinoctial twice a year, on the equinoxes, March 21 and September 23. On these days the sun rises at 6 a.m. and sets at 6 p.m. (local time) at every place on earth.

Meaning of who-wants-to-play

who-wants-to-play means: A small group of people would decide upon a certain game, but realise that they didn't have a large enough group to play it. Someone would say 'Shall we do Who-wants-to-play?' and we would link arms, and march self-importantly around the playground chanting 'Who-wants-to-play (pause) Brit-ish-Bull-dog?' (or whatever). The idea was that whoever else wanted to play would link arms with one end of the row and join in the chanting and walking around, until enough players were recruited. Of course, the usual outcome was that you would spend the whole of playtime recruiting players, and have no time for the actual game at all. We would often be rather selective about who we actually wanted to play with us, so would add various disclaimers at the end of the chant - 'Who-wants-to-play... Char-lies Ang-els... on-ly girls... from Mrs Hopkin's class... ov-er six... and no pik-eys...'

Meaning of plum

plum means: One hundred thousand pounds (£100,000). As referenced by Brewer in 1870. Seemingly no longer used. Origin unknown, although I received an interesting suggestion (thanks Giles Simmons, March 2007) of a possible connection with Jack Horner's plum in the nursery rhyme. The Jack Horner nursery rhyme is seemingly based on the story of Jack Horner, a steward to the Bishop of Glastonbury at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries (16th century), who was sent to Henry VIII with a bribe consisting of the deeds to twelve important properties in the area. Horner, so the story goes, believing the bribe to be a waste of time, kept for himself the best (the 'plum') of these properties, Mells Manor (near Mells, Frome, Somerset), in which apparently Horner's descendents still lived until quite recently. The Bishop was not so fortunate - he was hung drawn and quartered for remaining loyal to the Pope.

Meaning of maggie/brass maggie

maggie/brass maggie means: a pound coin (£1) - apparently used in South Yorkshire UK - the story is that the slang was adopted during the extremely acrimonious and prolonged miners' strike of 1984 which coincided with the introduction of the pound coin. Margaret Thatcher acted firmly and ruthlessly in resisting the efforts of the miners and the unions to save the pit jobs and the British coalmining industry, reinforcing her reputation for exercising the full powers of the state, creating resentment among many. When the pound coin appeared it was immediately christened a 'Maggie', based seemingly on the notion that it was '...a brassy piece that thinks it's a sovereign..." (ack J Jamieson, Sep 2007) If you have more detail about where and when this slang arose and is used, please let me know. I am grateful to J Briggs for confirming (March 2008): "...I live in Penistone, South Yorks (what we call the West Riding) and it was certainly called a 'Brass Maggie' in my area. Typically in a derisive way, such as 'I wouldn't give you a brass maggie for that' for something overpriced but low value. It never really caught on and has died out now..."

Meaning of pony

pony means: twenty-five pounds (£25). From the late 18th century according to most sources, London slang, but the precise origin is not known. Also expressed in cockney rhying slang as 'macaroni'. It is suggested by some that the pony slang for £25 derives from the typical price paid for a small horse, but in those times £25 would have been an unusually high price for a pony. Others have suggested that an Indian twenty-five rupee banknote featured a pony. Another suggestion (Ack P Bessell) is that pony might derive from the Latin words 'legem pone', which (according to the etymology source emtymonline.com) means, "........ 'payment of money, cash down,' [which interpretation apparently first appeared in] 1573, from first two words [and also the subtitle] of the fifth division of Psalm cxix [Psalm 119, verses 33 to 48, from the Bible's Old Testament], which begins the psalms at Matins on the 25th of the month; consequently associated with March 25, a quarter day in the old financial calendar, when payments and debts came due...." The words 'Legem pone' do not translate literally into monetary meaning, in the Psalm they words actully seem to equate to 'Teach me..' which is the corresponding phrase in the King James edition of the Bible. Other suggestions connecting the word pony with money include the Old German word 'poniren' meaning to pay, and a strange expression from the early 1800s, "There's no touching her, even for a poney [sic]," which apparently referred to a widow, Mrs Robinson, both of which appear in a collection of 'answers to correspondents' sent by readers and published by the Daily Mail in the 1990s.

Meaning of bob

bob means: shilling (1/-), although in recent times now means a pound or a dollar in certain regions. Historically bob was slang for a British shilling (Twelve old pence, pre-decimalisation - and twenty shillings to a pound). No plural version; it was 'thirty bob' not 'thirty bobs'. Prior to 1971 bob was one of the most commonly used English slang words. Now sadly gone in the UK for this particular meaning, although lots of other meanings remain (for example the verb or noun meaning of pooh, a haircut, and the verb meaning of cheat). Usage of bob for shilling dates back to the late 1700s. Origin is not known for sure. Possibilities include a connection with the church or bell-ringing since 'bob' meant a set of changes rung on the bells. This would be consistent with one of the possible origins and associations of the root of the word Shilling, (from Proto-Germanic 'skell' meaning to sound or ring). There is possibly an association with plumb-bob, being another symbolic piece of metal, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. Brewer's 1870 Dictionary of Phrase and Fable states that 'bob' could be derived from 'Bawbee', which was 16-19th century slang for a half-penny, in turn derived from: French 'bas billon', meaning debased copper money (coins were commonly cut to make change). Brewer also references the Laird of Sillabawby, a 16th century mintmaster, as a possible origin. Also perhaps a connection with a plumb-bob, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. 'Bob a nob', in the early 1800s meant 'a shilling a head', when estimating costs of meals, etc. In the 18th century 'bobstick' was a shillings-worth of gin. In parts of the US 'bob' was used for the US dollar coin. I am also informed (thanks K Inglott, March 2007) that bob is now slang for a pound in his part of the world (Bath, South-West England), and has also been used as money slang, presumably for Australian dollars, on the Home and Away TV soap series. A popular slang word like bob arguably develops a life of its own. Additionally (ack Martin Symington, Jun 2007) the word 'bob' is still commonly used among the white community of Tanzania in East Africa for the Tanzanian Shilling.

Meaning of March

March means: The distance passed over in marching; as, an hour's march; a march of twenty miles.

Meaning of Countermarch

Countermarch means: To march back, or to march in reversed order.

Meaning of March-mad

March-mad means: Extremely rash; foolhardy. See under March, the month.

Meaning of March

March means: A piece of music designed or fitted to accompany and guide the movement of troops; a piece of music in the march form.

Meaning of Straggle

Straggle means: To wander from the direct course or way; to rove; to stray; to wander from the line of march or desert the line of battle; as, when troops are on the march, the men should not straggle.

Meaning of Dismarch

Dismarch means: To march away.

Meaning of Marched

Marched means: of March

Meaning of Marching

Marching means: of March

Meaning of Marching

Marching means: a. & n., fr. March, v.

Meaning of Gait

Gait means: A going; a walk; a march; a way.

Meaning of Demarch

Demarch means: March; walk; gait.

Meaning of Troop

Troop means: To march on; to go forward in haste.

Meaning of Overmarch

Overmarch means: To march too far, or too much; to exhaust by marching.

Meaning of March-ward

March-ward means: A warden of the marches; a marcher.

Meaning of March

March means: The third month of the year, containing thirty-one days.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Cutty

Cutty means: A short spoon.

Meaning of Esnecy

Esnecy means: A prerogative given to the eldest coparcener to choose first after an inheritance is divided.

Meaning of Pushpin

Pushpin means: A child's game played with pins.

Meaning of Tranquillizing

Tranquillizing means: of Tranquillize

Meaning of Wash-off

Wash-off means: Capable of being washed off; not permanent or durable; -- said of colors not fixed by steaming or otherwise.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of ivories

ivories means: teeth

Meaning of pump it up

pump it up means: v. To engage in sexual intercourse, from the male perspective. 

Meaning of easy

easy means: Sexually consenting with little or no encouragement. [Eric was so easy to get, when I met him he was with his girlfriend, 10 minutes later we were kissing.].

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