Slang meaning of BELT AND BRACES

BELT AND BRACES means: Belt and braces is London Cockney rhyming slang for races.

What is the slang meaning/definition of BELT AND BRACES ?

BELT AND BRACES means: Belt and braces is London Cockney rhyming slang for races.

Slang definition of BELT AND BRACES

BELT AND BRACES means: Belt and braces is London Cockney rhyming slang for races.

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More meanings / definitions of Belt and braces is London Cockney rhyming slang for races. or words, sentences containing Belt and braces is London Cockney rhyming slang for races.?

Cockney (n.): A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Belt (n.): Anything that resembles a belt, or that encircles or crosses like a belt; a strip or stripe; as, a belt of trees; a belt of sand.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Elastic (n.): An elastic woven fabric, as a belt, braces or suspenders, etc., made in part of India rubber.

Belt (n.): That which engirdles a person or thing; a band or girdle; as, a lady's belt; a sword belt.

Belt (n.): A narrow passage or strait; as, the Great Belt and the Lesser Belt, leading to the Baltic Sea.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Baldric (n.): A broad belt, sometimes richly ornamented, worn over one shoulder, across the breast, and under the opposite arm; less properly, any belt.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Bracing (n.): Any system of braces; braces, collectively; as, the bracing of a truss.

Girdle (n.): That which girds, encircles, or incloses; a circumference; a belt; esp., a belt, sash, or article of dress encircling the body usually at the waist; a cestus.

Belt (v. t.): To encircle with, or as with, a belt; to encompass; to surround.

Bandolier (n.): A broad leather belt formerly worn by soldiers over the right shoulder and across the breast under the left arm. Originally it was used for supporting the musket and twelve cases for charges, but later only as a cartridge belt.

Flat-cap (n.): A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

Belted (a.): Encircled by, or secured with, a belt; as, a belted plaid; girt with a belt, as an honorary distinction; as, a belted knight; a belted earl.

Belt (n.): Same as Band, n., 2. A very broad band is more properly termed a belt.

Rhyming (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Rhyme

Triplet (n.): Three verses rhyming together.

Cockneys (pl. ): of Cockney

Cokenay (n.): A cockney.

Cockney (a.): Of or relating to, or like, cockneys.

Quatrain (n.): A stanza of four lines rhyming alternately.

Rhymery (n.): The art or habit of making rhymes; rhyming; -- in contempt.

Cockneyism (n.): The characteristics, manners, or dialect, of a cockney.

Cockneyfy (v. t.): To form with the manners or character of a cockney.

Cockney (n.): An effeminate person; a spoilt child.

Chime (n.): To make a rude correspondence of sounds; to jingle, as in rhyming.

Bowbell (n.): One born within hearing distance of Bow-bells; a cockney.

Coupling (n.): A device or contrivance which serves to couple or connect adjacent parts or objects; as, a belt coupling, which connects the ends of a belt; a car coupling, which connects the cars in a train; a shaft coupling, which connects the ends of shafts.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Belt and braces is London Cockney rhyming slang for races.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Belt and braces is London Cockney rhyming slang for races.

Meaning of BELT AND BRACES

BELT AND BRACES means: Belt and braces is London Cockney rhyming slang for races.

Meaning of EPSOM RACES

EPSOM RACES means: Epsom races is London Cockney rhyming slang for braces.Epsom races is London Cockney rhyming slang for a group of friends (faces).

Meaning of ASCOT RACES

ASCOT RACES means: Ascot races is London Cockney rhyming slang for braces.

Meaning of BELT AND BRACES MAN

BELT AND BRACES MAN means: Belt and braces man is slang for an overly cautious person.

Meaning of BLAYDON RACES

BLAYDON RACES means: Blaydon races is North−East British rhyming slang for braces.

Meaning of BRACES AND BITS

BRACES AND BITS means: Braces and bits is London Cockney rhyming slang for breasts (tits).

Meaning of AIRS AND GRACES

AIRS AND GRACES means: Airs and graces is London cockney rhyming slang for faces (people). Airs and graces was London cockney rhyming slang for bracesAirs and graces was London cockney rhyming slang for races.

Meaning of IN AND OUT

IN AND OUT means: In and out is British slang for sexual intercourse.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for snout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for spout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for sprout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for stout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for tout.

Meaning of Ascot Races

Ascot Races means: Braces

Meaning of BUBBLE AND SQUEAK

BUBBLE AND SQUEAK means: Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for beak (a magistrate). Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Greek.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for speak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for weak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a week.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for to urinate (leak).

Meaning of JACK AND JILL

JACK AND JILL means: Jack and Jill is British slang for a male and female police officer working as a partnership. Jack andJill is London Cockney rhyming slang for hill.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for bill.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for till.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for pill.

Meaning of HARRY TATE

HARRY TATE means: Harry Tate is bingo slang for eight.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for late.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for plate.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for a state of agitation or nervousness (state). HarryTate is London Cockney rhyming slang for weight.Harry Tate is British merchant navy slang for mate.

Meaning of DUKE OF YORK

DUKE OF YORK means: Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for chalk. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for cork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for fork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for pork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for talk. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for walk.

Meaning of DAILY MAIL

DAILY MAIL means: Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for tale. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for ale. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for bail. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for nail.Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for the backside, buttocks (tail). Daily Mail is British slang for the sex.

Meaning of TEAPOT LID

TEAPOT LID means: Tewapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for a child (kid).Teapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for one pound sterling (quid).Teapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Jew (Yid).

Meaning of BREAD AND BUTTER

BREAD AND BUTTER means: Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for gutter. Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for nutter. Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for putter. Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for shutter. Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for stutter.

Meaning of SAUSAGE ROLL

SAUSAGE ROLL means: Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for unemployment (dole). Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for a pole.Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Polish person (Pole). Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for poll.Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for the head (poll).

Meaning of NOAH'S ARK

NOAH'S ARK means: Noah's ark is London Cockney rhyming slang for park. Noah's ark is London Cockney rhyming slang for nark. Noah's ark is London Cockney rhyming slang for dark. Noah's ark is London Cockney rhyming slang for lark.

Meaning of RORY O'MORE

RORY O'MORE means: Rory O'More is London Cockney rhyming slang for floor. Rory O'More is London Cockney rhyming slang for door. Rory O'More is London Cockney rhyming slang for poor. Rory O'More is London Cockney rhyming slang for whorer.

Meaning of LOLLIPOP

LOLLIPOP means: Lollipop is British slang for the penis.Lollipop is London Cockney rhyming slang for to inform on someone (shop).Lollipop is London Cockney rhyming slang for drop.Lollipop is London Cockney rhyming slang for the police (cop).

Meaning of Cockney

Cockney means: A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Meaning of Belt

Belt means: Anything that resembles a belt, or that encircles or crosses like a belt; a strip or stripe; as, a belt of trees; a belt of sand.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Elastic

Elastic means: An elastic woven fabric, as a belt, braces or suspenders, etc., made in part of India rubber.

Meaning of Belt

Belt means: That which engirdles a person or thing; a band or girdle; as, a lady's belt; a sword belt.

Meaning of Belt

Belt means: A narrow passage or strait; as, the Great Belt and the Lesser Belt, leading to the Baltic Sea.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Meaning of Baldric

Baldric means: A broad belt, sometimes richly ornamented, worn over one shoulder, across the breast, and under the opposite arm; less properly, any belt.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Meaning of Bracing

Bracing means: Any system of braces; braces, collectively; as, the bracing of a truss.

Meaning of Girdle

Girdle means: That which girds, encircles, or incloses; a circumference; a belt; esp., a belt, sash, or article of dress encircling the body usually at the waist; a cestus.

Meaning of Belt

Belt means: To encircle with, or as with, a belt; to encompass; to surround.

Meaning of Bandolier

Bandolier means: A broad leather belt formerly worn by soldiers over the right shoulder and across the breast under the left arm. Originally it was used for supporting the musket and twelve cases for charges, but later only as a cartridge belt.

Meaning of Flat-cap

Flat-cap means: A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Impasting

Impasting means: The laying on of colors to produce impasto.

Meaning of Rentered

Rentered means: of Renter

Meaning of Septum

Septum means: A wall separating two cavities; a partition; as, the nasal septum.

Meaning of Slighting

Slighting means: of Slight

Meaning of Woodenly

Woodenly means: Clumsily; stupidly; blockishly.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of GOOF

GOOF means: Goof is slang for a stupid blunder.Goof is slang for someone who makes stupid blunders.Goof is American slang for to spend time idly or irresponsibly.

Meaning of shoot!

shoot! means: Exclam. A euphemism for 'shit'. [Orig. U.S.]

Meaning of pimpin

pimpin means: Managing prostitutes. What a pimp does.

Meaning of on the make

on the make means: Looking for profit or advantage. His words with me suggested that he is on the make for a promotion.

Meaning of Niglige

Niglige means: This describes the snow that piles up on the side of the street that turns black. To make a black snowman, you use niglige.

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