Slang meaning of STRIPY

STRIPY means: Stripy is nautical slang for a long−service able seaman with good conduct stripes.

What is the slang meaning/definition of STRIPY ?

STRIPY means: Stripy is nautical slang for a long−service able seaman with good conduct stripes.

Slang definition of STRIPY

STRIPY means: Stripy is nautical slang for a long−service able seaman with good conduct stripes.

More meanings / definitions of / dictionary similarities to Stripy is nautical slang for a long−service able seaman with good conduct stripes. or words, sentences containing Stripy is nautical slang for a long−service able seaman with good conduct stripes.?

Serve (v. i.): To be in service; to do duty; to discharge the requirements of an office or employment. Specifically, to act in the public service, as a soldier, seaman. etc.

Deserter (n.): One who forsakes a duty, a cause or a party, a friend, or any one to whom he owes service; especially, a soldier or a seaman who abandons the service without leave; one guilty of desertion.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Tithingman (n.): A parish officer elected annually to preserve good order in the church during divine service, to make complaint of any disorderly conduct, and to enforce the observance of the Sabbath.

Nautical (a.): Of or pertaining to seamen, to the art of navigation, or to ships; as, nautical skill.

Nautically (adv.): In a nautical manner; with reference to nautical affairs.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Serviceable (a.): Doing service; promoting happiness, interest, advantage, or any good; useful to any end; adapted to any good end use; beneficial; advantageous.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Indecorous (a.): Not decorous; violating good manners; contrary to good breeding or etiquette; unbecoming; improper; out of place; as, indecorous conduct.

Seamanship (n.): The skill of a good seaman; the art, or skill in the art, of working a ship.

Stripe (v. t.): To make stripes upon; to form with lines of different colors or textures; to variegate with stripes.

Chastise (v. t.): To inflict pain upon, by means of stripes, or in any other manner, for the purpose of punishment or reformation; to punish, as with stripes.

Bad (superl.): Wanting good qualities, whether physical or moral; injurious, hurtful, inconvenient, offensive, painful, unfavorable, or defective, either physically or morally; evil; vicious; wicked; -- the opposite of good; as, a bad man; bad conduct; bad habits; bad soil; bad health; bad crop; bad news.

Paling (n.): The act of placing pales or stripes on cloth; also, the stripes themselves.

Frankpledge (n.): A pledge or surety for the good behavior of freemen, -- each freeman who was a member of an ancient decennary, tithing, or friborg, in England, being a pledge for the good conduct of the others, for the preservation of the public peace; a free surety.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Schoolship (n.): A vessel employed as a nautical training school, in which naval apprentices receive their education at the expense of the state, and are trained for service as sailors. Also, a vessel used as a reform school to which boys are committed by the courts to be disciplined, and instructed as mariners.

Good (superl.): Not small, insignificant, or of no account; considerable; esp., in the phrases a good deal, a good way, a good degree, a good share or part, etc.

Doing (n.): Anything done; a deed; an action good or bad; hence, in the plural, conduct; behavior. See Do.

Rubric (n.): The directions and rules for the conduct of service, formerly written or printed in red; hence, also, an ecclesiastical or episcopal injunction; -- usually in the plural.

Profit (n.): To be of service to; to be good to; to help on; to benefit; to advantage; to avail; to aid; as, truth profits all men.

Testimonial (a.): A writing or certificate which bears testimony in favor of one's character, good conduct, ability, etc., or of the value of a thing.

Good (superl.): Not blemished or impeached; fair; honorable; unsullied; as in the phrases a good name, a good report, good repute, etc.

Officiate (v. i.): To act as an officer in performing a duty; to transact the business of an office or public trust; to conduct a public service.

Principle (v. t.): To equip with principles; to establish, or fix, in certain principles; to impress with any tenet, or rule of conduct, good or ill.

Curcuma (n.): A genus of plants of the order Scitamineae, including the turmeric plant (Curcuma longa).

Service (n.): The act and manner of bringing food to the persons who eat it; order of dishes at table; also, a set or number of vessels ordinarily used at table; as, the service was tardy and awkward; a service of plate or glass.

Deserve (v. t.): To earn by service; to be worthy of (something due, either good or evil); to merit; to be entitled to; as, the laborer deserves his wages; a work of value deserves praise.

Reputable (a.): Having, or worthy of, good repute; held in esteem; honorable; praiseworthy; as, a reputable man or character; reputable conduct.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Stripy is nautical slang for a long−service able seaman with good conduct stripes.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Stripy is nautical slang for a long−service able seaman with good conduct stripes.

Meaning of STRIPY

STRIPY means: Stripy is nautical slang for a long−service able seaman with good conduct stripes.

Meaning of Three White Tapes on a Seaman's Collar

Three White Tapes on a Seaman's Collar means: On traditional square rig, the three white stripes on the collar are commonly said to commemorate Horatio Nelson's three great battles: the Nile, Copenhagen and Trafalgar. However, it is also said that there is no truth in this. Others say that the three stripes were actually a device to ensure the previous collar with two stripes was no longer used.

Meaning of STRIPES

STRIPES means: Stripes is American slang for a striped prison uniform.

Meaning of DOGSBODY

DOGSBODY means: Dogsbody is old nautical slang for a dish of peas boiled in a cloth.Dogsbody is old nautical slang for a dish of sea−biscuits soaked to a pulp in water and sugar.Dogsbody is old nautical slang for a junior officer.Dogsbody is old nautical slang for a person given menial tasks.

Meaning of Nautical Mile

Nautical Mile means: Distance at sea is measured in nautical miles, which are about 6076 feet, 1.15 statute miles or 1852 meters. Nautical miles have the unique property that a minute of latitude is equal to one nautical mile. Measurement of speed is done in knots where one knot equals one nautical mile per hour.

Meaning of On the Beach

On the Beach means: Said of a seaman who has retired from sea service.

Meaning of Leading Seaman

Leading Seaman means: A Leading Seaman (abbreviated LS) is the naval equivalent of Corporal in the Army and Air Force. The current rank insignia of a Leading Seaman is two chevrons. Traditionally, the Leading Seaman's rank badge was a fouled anchor. See Killick.

Meaning of Able Seaman

Able Seaman means: The rank of Able Seaman is the equivalent of Private in the Army or Air Force, with rank insignia of a single chevron. Derived from the term "Able Bodied Seaman".

Meaning of Mile

Mile means: Distance at sea is measured in nautical miles, which are about 6067.12 feet, 1.15 statute miles or exactly 1852 meters. Nautical miles have the unique property that a minute of latitude is equal to one nautical mile : Measurement of speed is done in knots where one knot equals one nautical mile per hour.

Meaning of Quartermaster

Quartermaster means: At sea, the quartermaster is the Master Seaman, Leading Seaman or Able Seaman who is in charge of the helmsman. In harbour, the quartermaster is the senior member of the gangway staff and is responsible for supervising the bosn's mate and the security of the brow.

Meaning of Close Quarters

Close Quarters means: This term has a nautical origin. In the 17th century hand-to-hand skirmishes onboard ships were known as close-fights. The term appears to have been applied both to those fights and to the barriers that sailors erected to keep the enemy at bay. Captain John Smith, in his record of early seafaring terms, - 'The Seaman's Grammar', 1627 is good enough to define the term: "A ships close fights, are smal ledges of wood laid crosse one another like the grates of iron in a prisons window, betwixt the maine mast, and the fore mast, and are called gratings."

Meaning of Able Bodied Seamen

Able Bodied Seamen means: A member of the deck crew who is able to perform all the duties of an experienced seaman; certificated by examination; must have three years sea service. Also called Able Seamen and A.B.

Meaning of Ordinary Seaman (OS)

Ordinary Seaman (OS) means: An apprentice Able Seaman, assists AB's, bosun, and officers, keeps facilities clean.

Meaning of NAUTICAL MILES

NAUTICAL MILES means: Nautical miles is British rhyming slang for haemorrhoids (piles).

Meaning of Whistling Psalms to the Taffrail

Whistling Psalms to the Taffrail means: Nautical phrase that means giving good advice that will not be taken.

Meaning of Page

Page means: a boy (male minor) who serves as seaman and/or is trained for such service. It was the job of a ship's page to turn the hourglasses and thus provide the times for the ship's log.

Meaning of RABBIT

RABBIT means: Rabbit (shortened from rabbit and pork) is Cockney rhyming slang for to talk, often unceasingly. Rabbit is derogatory slang for a person who is a novice or bad at a sport or game. Rabbit is Australian and nautical slang for a smuggled or stolen article.Rabbit is Australian and nautical slang for borrow, steal.

Meaning of Mind your P's and Q's

Mind your P's and Q's means: In the days of sail when sailors were paid a pittance, seamen drank their ale in taverns whose keepers were willing to extend credit until payday. Since many salts were illiterate, keepers kept a tally of pints and quarts consumed by each sailor on a chalkboard behind the bar. Next to each person's name, a mark was made under "P" for pint or "Q" for quart whenever a seaman ordered another draught. Also, on payday, each seaman was liable for each mark next to his name, so he was forced to "mind his P's and Q's" or he would get into financial trouble. To ensure an accurate count by unscrupulous keepers, sailors had to keep their wits and remain somewhat sober. Sobriety usually ensured good behavior, hence the meaning of "mind your P's and Q's".

Meaning of Nautical

Nautical means: Having to do with boats, ships, or sailing. Nautical originates from the Greek word 'nauti' meaning sailor.

Meaning of REACHER

REACHER means: Reacher was American gangster slang for a long−range gun, a rifle.

Meaning of Serve

Serve means: To be in service; to do duty; to discharge the requirements of an office or employment. Specifically, to act in the public service, as a soldier, seaman. etc.

Meaning of Deserter

Deserter means: One who forsakes a duty, a cause or a party, a friend, or any one to whom he owes service; especially, a soldier or a seaman who abandons the service without leave; one guilty of desertion.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Tithingman

Tithingman means: A parish officer elected annually to preserve good order in the church during divine service, to make complaint of any disorderly conduct, and to enforce the observance of the Sabbath.

Meaning of Nautical

Nautical means: Of or pertaining to seamen, to the art of navigation, or to ships; as, nautical skill.

Meaning of Nautically

Nautically means: In a nautical manner; with reference to nautical affairs.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Serviceable

Serviceable means: Doing service; promoting happiness, interest, advantage, or any good; useful to any end; adapted to any good end use; beneficial; advantageous.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Meaning of Indecorous

Indecorous means: Not decorous; violating good manners; contrary to good breeding or etiquette; unbecoming; improper; out of place; as, indecorous conduct.

Meaning of Seamanship

Seamanship means: The skill of a good seaman; the art, or skill in the art, of working a ship.

Meaning of Stripe

Stripe means: To make stripes upon; to form with lines of different colors or textures; to variegate with stripes.

Meaning of Chastise

Chastise means: To inflict pain upon, by means of stripes, or in any other manner, for the purpose of punishment or reformation; to punish, as with stripes.

Meaning of Bad

Bad means: Wanting good qualities, whether physical or moral; injurious, hurtful, inconvenient, offensive, painful, unfavorable, or defective, either physically or morally; evil; vicious; wicked; -- the opposite of good; as, a bad man; bad conduct; bad habits; bad soil; bad health; bad crop; bad news.

Meaning of Paling

Paling means: The act of placing pales or stripes on cloth; also, the stripes themselves.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Coracoid

Coracoid means: Pertaining to a bone of the shoulder girdle in most birds, reptiles, and amphibians, which is reduced to a process of the scapula in most mammals.

Meaning of Hygrostatics

Hygrostatics means: The science or art of comparing or measuring degrees of moisture.

Meaning of Issue

Issue means: In pleading, a single material point of law or fact depending in the suit, which, being affirmed on the one side and denied on the other, is presented for determination. See General issue, under General, and Feigned issue, under Feigned.

Meaning of Pass-key

Pass-key means: A key for opening more locks than one; a master key.

Meaning of Weigh-house

Weigh-house means: A building at or within which goods, and the like, are weighed.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of RAG, TAG AND BOBTAIL

RAG, TAG AND BOBTAIL means: Rag, tag and bobtail was th century British slang for the peasantry, the poor, riff−raff.

Meaning of Stack

Stack means: Order of pancakes

Meaning of Bowie-Knife

Bowie-Knife means: A knife from ten to fifteen inches long and about two inches broad, so named after its inventor, James Bowie.

Meaning of Nebuchadnezzar

Nebuchadnezzar means:   Male sexual organs; "to put Nebuchadnezzar out to grass" means to engage in sexual intercourse.

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