Slang meaning of ZAMBUCK

ZAMBUCK means: Zambuck was early and mid−th century Australian slang for a St John's Ambulance man.

What is the slang meaning/definition of ZAMBUCK ?

ZAMBUCK means: Zambuck was early and mid−th century Australian slang for a St John's Ambulance man.

Slang definition of ZAMBUCK

ZAMBUCK means: Zambuck was early and mid−th century Australian slang for a St John's Ambulance man.

More meanings / definitions of Zambuck was early and mid−th century Australian slang for a St John's Ambulance man. or words, sentences containing Zambuck was early and mid−th century Australian slang for a St John's Ambulance man.?

Ambulance (n.): A field hospital, so organized as to follow an army in its movements, and intended to succor the wounded as soon as possible. Often used adjectively; as, an ambulance wagon; ambulance stretcher; ambulance corps.

Ambulance (n.): An ambulance wagon or cart for conveying the wounded from the field, or to a hospital.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Apocalypse (n.): The revelation delivered to St. John, in the isle of Patmos, near the close of the first century, forming the last book of the New Testament.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Uncial (a.): Of, pertaining to, or designating, a certain style of letters used in ancient manuscripts, esp. in Greek and Latin manuscripts. The letters are somewhat rounded, and the upstrokes and downstrokes usually have a slight inclination. These letters were used as early as the 1st century b. c., and were seldom used after the 10th century a. d., being superseded by the cursive style.

Calvinism (n.): The theological tenets or doctrines of John Calvin (a French theologian and reformer of the 16th century) and his followers, or of the so-called calvinistic churches.

Fratricelli (n. pl.): The name which St. Francis of Assisi gave to his followers, early in the 13th century.

Early (adv.): In advance of the usual or appointed time; in good season; prior in time; among or near the first; -- opposed to late; as, the early bird; an early spring; early fruit.

Scampavia (n.): A long, low war galley used by the Neapolitans and Sicilians in the early part of the nineteenth century.

Salian (a.): Denoting a tribe of Franks who established themselves early in the fourth century on the river Sala [now Yssel]; Salic.

Momier (n.): A name given in contempt to strict Calvinists in Switzerland, France, and some parts of Germany, in the early part of the 19th century.

Rap (n.): A popular name for any of the tokens that passed current for a half-penny in Ireland in the early part of the eighteenth century; any coin of trifling value.

Mida (n.): The larva of the bean fly.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Reformation (n.): Specifically (Eccl. Hist.), the important religious movement commenced by Luther early in the sixteenth century, which resulted in the formation of the various Protestant churches.

Libertine (n.): One of a sect of Anabaptists, in the fifteenth and early part of the sixteenth century, who rejected many of the customs and decencies of life, and advocated a community of goods and of women.

Maurist (n.): A member of the Congregation of Saint Maur, an offshoot of the Benedictines, originating in France in the early part of the seventeenth century. The Maurists have been distinguished for their interest in literature.

Johannean (a.): Of or pertaining to John, esp. to the Apostle John or his writings.

Convulsionist (n.): One who has convulsions; esp., one of a body of fanatics in France, early in the eighteenth century, who went into convulsions under the influence of religious emotion; as, the Convulsionists of St. Medard.

Humanist (n.): One of the scholars who in the field of literature proper represented the movement of the Renaissance, and early in the 16th century adopted the name Humanist as their distinctive title.

Rosicrucian (n.): One who, in the 17th century and the early part of the 18th, claimed to belong to a secret society of philosophers deeply versed in the secrets of nature, -- the alleged society having existed, it was stated, several hundred years.

Brunonian (a.): Pertaining to, or invented by, Brown; -- a term applied to a system of medicine promulgated in the 18th century by John Brown, of Scotland, the fundamental doctrine of which was, that life is a state of excitation produced by the normal action of external agents upon the body, and that disease consists in excess or deficiency of excitation.

Mystery (n.): A dramatic representation of a Scriptural subject, often some event in the life of Christ; a dramatic composition of this character; as, the Chester Mysteries, consisting of dramas acted by various craft associations in that city in the early part of the 14th century.

Consolato del mare (): A collection of maritime laws of disputed origin, supposed to have been first published at Barcelona early in the 14th century. It has formed the basis of most of the subsequent collections of maritime laws.

Glassite (n.): A member of a Scottish sect, founded in the 18th century by John Glass, a minister of the Established Church of Scotland, who taught that justifying faith is "no more than a simple assent to the divine testimone passively recived by the understanding." The English and American adherents of this faith are called Sandemanians, after Robert Sandeman, the son-in-law and disciple of Glass.

Templar (n.): One of a religious and military order first established at Jerusalem, in the early part of the 12th century, for the protection of pilgrims and of the Holy Sepulcher. These Knights Templars, or Knights of the Temple, were so named because they occupied an apartment of the palace of Bladwin II. in Jerusalem, near the Temple.

Hastings (v.): Early fruit or vegetables; especially, early pease.

Early (adv.): Soon; in good season; seasonably; betimes; as, come early.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Zambuck was early and mid−th century Australian slang for a St John's Ambulance man.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Zambuck was early and mid−th century Australian slang for a St John's Ambulance man.

Meaning of ZAMBUCK

ZAMBUCK means: Zambuck was early and mid−th century Australian slang for a St John's Ambulance man.

Meaning of BUZZY

BUZZY means: Buzzy was mid−th century slang for slightly intoxicated. Buzzy was early th century slang for crazy, eccentric.

Meaning of JOHN

JOHN means: John is slang for the lavatory.John is prostitute slang for a prostitute's client.John was th century slang for a sweetheart.John is British slang for a condom.John is a British slang form of address for a man.

Meaning of DATE

DATE means: Date is Australian slang for the anus.Date was British mid−th century slang for a stupid, silly or weak person.

Meaning of PEB

PEB means: Peb was early th century Australian slang for a young gangster.

Meaning of AMBO

AMBO means: Ambo is Australian slang for an ambulance or ambulance officer.

Meaning of SAX

SAX means: Sax is slang for saxophone.Sax was early th century Australian slang for sixpence.

Meaning of BANGER

BANGER means: Banger is British slang for a sausage.Banger is British slang for an old or decrepit vehicle.Banger is drugs slang for a hypodermic syringe.Banger was mid−th century slang for a kiss.Banger is Australian slang for a morning coat.

Meaning of ZIB

ZIB means: Zib was mid−th century American slang for someone eccentric.

Meaning of JOHN HOP

JOHN HOP means: John Hop is British and Australian rhyming slang for cop, a policeman.

Meaning of JOHN BULL

JOHN BULL means: John Bull is London Cockney rhyming slang for full. John Bull is Cockney rhyming slang for an arrest (pull). John Bull is Australian slang for drunk.

Meaning of NINEPENNYWORTH

NINEPENNYWORTH means: Ninepennyworth was mid−th century slang for a nine−month prison sentence.

Meaning of TOLE

TOLE means: Tole was mid−th century slang for a street fight or brawl.

Meaning of JEETER

JEETER means: Jeeter was mid−th century American slang for a rustic or peasant.

Meaning of SANKEY

SANKEY means: Sankey was mid−th century West Indian slang for a hymn.

Meaning of CHARVER

CHARVER means: Charver was mid−th century British slang for sexual intercourse.

Meaning of BALLOCKS

BALLOCKS means: Ballocks was, until the mid−th century, slang for the testicles; nonsense.

Meaning of SOUNDS

SOUNDS means: Sounds was mid−th century slang for tunes or music.

Meaning of PECKS

PECKS means: Pecks was mid−th century slang for food.

Meaning of AMBULANCE CHASER

AMBULANCE CHASER means: Ambulance Chaser is American slang for a lawyer who seeks to encourage and profit from the lawsuits of accident victims.

Meaning of Ambulance

Ambulance means: A field hospital, so organized as to follow an army in its movements, and intended to succor the wounded as soon as possible. Often used adjectively; as, an ambulance wagon; ambulance stretcher; ambulance corps.

Meaning of Ambulance

Ambulance means: An ambulance wagon or cart for conveying the wounded from the field, or to a hospital.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Apocalypse

Apocalypse means: The revelation delivered to St. John, in the isle of Patmos, near the close of the first century, forming the last book of the New Testament.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Meaning of Uncial

Uncial means: Of, pertaining to, or designating, a certain style of letters used in ancient manuscripts, esp. in Greek and Latin manuscripts. The letters are somewhat rounded, and the upstrokes and downstrokes usually have a slight inclination. These letters were used as early as the 1st century b. c., and were seldom used after the 10th century a. d., being superseded by the cursive style.

Meaning of Calvinism

Calvinism means: The theological tenets or doctrines of John Calvin (a French theologian and reformer of the 16th century) and his followers, or of the so-called calvinistic churches.

Meaning of Fratricelli

Fratricelli means: The name which St. Francis of Assisi gave to his followers, early in the 13th century.

Meaning of Early

Early means: In advance of the usual or appointed time; in good season; prior in time; among or near the first; -- opposed to late; as, the early bird; an early spring; early fruit.

Meaning of Scampavia

Scampavia means: A long, low war galley used by the Neapolitans and Sicilians in the early part of the nineteenth century.

Meaning of Salian

Salian means: Denoting a tribe of Franks who established themselves early in the fourth century on the river Sala [now Yssel]; Salic.

Meaning of Momier

Momier means: A name given in contempt to strict Calvinists in Switzerland, France, and some parts of Germany, in the early part of the 19th century.

Meaning of Rap

Rap means: A popular name for any of the tokens that passed current for a half-penny in Ireland in the early part of the eighteenth century; any coin of trifling value.

Meaning of Mida

Mida means: The larva of the bean fly.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Complacential

Complacential means: Marked by, or causing, complacence.

Meaning of Landaulet

Landaulet means: A small landau.

Meaning of Sea elephant

Sea elephant means: A very large seal (Macrorhinus proboscideus) of the Antarctic seas, much hunted for its oil. It sometimes attains a length of thirty feet, and is remarkable for the prolongation of the nose of the adult male into an erectile elastic proboscis, about a foot in length. Another species of smaller size (M. angustirostris) occurs on the coast of Lower California, but is now nearly extinct.

Meaning of Stress

Stress means: The force, or combination of forces, which produces a strain; force exerted in any direction or manner between contiguous bodies, or parts of bodies, and taking specific names according to its direction, or mode of action, as thrust or pressure, pull or tension, shear or tangential stress.

Meaning of Tarriance

Tarriance means: The act or time of tarrying; delay; lateness.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of WEED

WEED means: Weed is slang for a cigarette, tobacco. Weed is slang for cannabis.Weed is British slang for a weak and ineffective person. Weed is British slang for to steal, embezzle.

Meaning of shreddie

shreddie means: Hairstyle used by (and insult used for) men whose hair is thinning, in a vain attempt to make it look as if it has some "body". In shape and form it has the unfortunate result of looking like they have a Shredded Wheat* on their heads thus rendering them a laughing stock to all and sundry - except that of course to themselves. A famous "Shreddie" is Andrew O'Neill sometime editor of The Times Newspaper. *For those unfamiliar with the term, Shredded Wheat is a kind of breakfast 'biscuit' that looks feels and tastes like knitted straw.

Meaning of fire

fire means: to throw something (“he fired stones at the birds”)

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