Slang meaning of belly timber

belly timber means: Noun. Food. [Early 1700s]

What is the slang meaning/definition of belly timber ?

belly timber means: Noun. Food. [Early 1700s]

Slang definition of belly timber

belly timber means: Noun. Food. [Early 1700s]

More meanings / definitions of Noun. Food. [Early 1700s] or words, sentences containing Noun. Food. [Early 1700s]?

Preposition (n.): A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Early (adv.): In advance of the usual or appointed time; in good season; prior in time; among or near the first; -- opposed to late; as, the early bird; an early spring; early fruit.

Aptote (n.): A noun which has no distinction of cases; an indeclinable noun.

Theme (n.): A noun or verb, not modified by inflections; also, that part of a noun or verb which remains unchanged (except by euphonic variations) in declension or conjugation; stem.

Inflect (v. t.): To vary, as a noun or a verb in its terminations; to decline, as a noun or adjective, or to conjugate, as a verb.

Hastings (v.): Early fruit or vegetables; especially, early pease.

Early (adv.): Soon; in good season; seasonably; betimes; as, come early.

Unseasonable (a.): Not seasonable; being, done, or occurring out of the proper season; ill-timed; untimely; too early or too late; as, he called at an unseasonable hour; unseasonable advice; unseasonable frosts; unseasonable food.

Case (n.): One of the forms, or the inflections or changes of form, of a noun, pronoun, or adjective, which indicate its relation to other words, and in the aggregate constitute its declension; the relation which a noun or pronoun sustains to some other word.

Which (pron.): A relative pronoun, used esp. in referring to an antecedent noun or clause, but sometimes with reference to what is specified or implied in a sentence, or to a following noun or clause (generally involving a reference, however, to something which has preceded). It is used in all numbers and genders, and was formerly used of persons.

Income (n.): That which is taken into the body as food; the ingesta; -- sometimes restricted to the nutritive, or digestible, portion of the food. See Food. Opposed to output.

Rule (a.): A general principle concerning the formation or use of words, or a concise statement thereof; thus, it is a rule in England, that s or es , added to a noun in the singular number, forms the plural of that noun; but "man" forms its plural "men", and is an exception to the rule.

Make (v. t.): To bring about; to bring forward; to be the cause or agent of; to effect, do, perform, or execute; -- often used with a noun to form a phrase equivalent to the simple verb that corresponds to such noun; as, to make complaint, for to complain; to make record of, for to record; to make abode, for to abide, etc.

Soil (v. t.): To feed, as cattle or horses, in the barn or an inclosure, with fresh grass or green food cut for them, instead of sending them out to pasture; hence (such food having the effect of purging them), to purge by feeding on green food; as, to soil a horse.

Mess (n.): A quantity of food set on a table at one time; provision of food for a person or party for one meal; as, a mess of pottage; also, the food given to a beast at one time.

Youthful (a.): Of or pertaining to the early part of life; suitable to early life; as, youthful days; youthful sports.

Dog days (): A period of from four to six weeks, in the summer, variously placed by almanac makers between the early part of July and the early part of September; canicular days; -- so called in reference to the rising in ancient times of the Dog Star (Sirius) with the sun. Popularly, the sultry, close part of the summer.

Viand (n.): An article of food; provisions; food; victuals; -- used chiefly in the plural.

Hunger (n.): An uneasy sensation occasioned normally by the want of food; a craving or desire for food.

Cates (n.): Provisions; food; viands; especially, luxurious food; delicacies; dainties.

Wash (n.): Waste liquid, the refuse of food, the collection from washed dishes, etc., from a kitchen, often used as food for pigs.

Browse (n.): The tender branches or twigs of trees and shrubs, fit for the food of cattle and other animals; green food.

Eat (v. t.): To chew and swallow as food; to devour; -- said especially of food not liquid; as, to eat bread.

Underfeed (v. t.): To feed with too little food; to supply with an insufficient quantity of food.

Foodful (a.): Full of food; supplying food; fruitful; fertile.

Eat (v. i.): To take food; to feed; especially, to take solid, in distinction from liquid, food; to board.

Flesh (n.): Animal food, in distinction from vegetable; meat; especially, the body of beasts and birds used as food, as distinguished from fish.

Pabular (a.): Of, pertaining to, or fit for, pabulum or food; affording food.

Repast (v. t. & i.): To supply food to; to feast; to take food.

Scurvy (n.): A disease characterized by livid spots, especially about the thighs and legs, due to extravasation of blood, and by spongy gums, and bleeding from almost all the mucous membranes. It is accompanied by paleness, languor, depression, and general debility. It is occasioned by confinement, innutritious food, and hard labor, but especially by lack of fresh vegetable food, or confinement for a long time to a limited range of food, which is incapable of repairing the waste of the system. It was formerly prevalent among sailors and soldiers.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Noun. Food. [Early 1700s]?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Noun. Food. [Early 1700s]

Meaning of belly timber

belly timber means: Noun. Food. [Early 1700s]

Meaning of two and a kick

two and a kick means: half a crown (2/6), from the early 1700s, based on the basic (not cockney) rhyming with 'two and six'.

Meaning of Bedfordshire

Bedfordshire means: Noun. Bed or bedtime. [1700s]

Meaning of snitch

snitch means: Verb. To inform on somebody. Noun. Someone who snitches. [1700s]

Meaning of prick

prick means: Noun. 1. The penis. [S.e. until 1700s] 2. An idiot, contemptible person.

Meaning of foodie *

foodie * means: Noun. 1. A person with a particular interest in food and things culinary. 2. Of, or concerning food. * Also foody.

Meaning of takeaway

takeaway means: Noun. Of food, a take out, fast food. {Informal}

Meaning of SAL'TING

SAL'TING means: . dishes cooked with saltfish or meat.. that part of the meal which is served with the "food" (starchy food, ground food).. by some strange extension, the female organ, often simply called "sal". the food that goes with the rice, potatoes or starchy food; like calalloo, fish and sauce, sauces or gravy

Meaning of strike

strike means: a sovereign (early 1700s) and later, a pound, based on the coin minting process which is called 'striking' a coin, so called because of the stamping process used in making coins.

Meaning of kick

kick means: sixpence (6d), from the early 1700s, derived purely from the lose rhyming with six (not cockney rhyming slang), extending to and possible preceded and prompted by the slang expression 'two and a kick' meaning half a crown, i.e., two shillings and sixpence, commonly expressed as 'two and six', which is a more understandable association.

Meaning of wigs on the green

wigs on the green means: Noun. A fight, brawl. Dated. E.g."There'll be wigs on the green when your father hears about your truancy." [Irish use/1700s]

Meaning of SOUL FOOD

SOUL FOOD means: Soul food is Black American slang for traditional Southern states food.

Meaning of bunce

bunce means: money, usually unexpected gain and extra to an agreed or predicted payment, typically not realised by the payer. Earlier English spelling was bunts or bunse, dating from the late 1700s or early 1800s (Cassells and Partridge). Origins are not certain. Bunts also used to refer to unwanted or unaccounted-for goods sold for a crafty gain by workers, and activity typically hidden from the business owner. Suggestions of origin include a supposed cockney rhyming slang shortening of bunsen burner (

Meaning of JUNK FOOD

JUNK FOOD means: Junk food is British slang for unsophisticated food of a perceived low nutritional value.

Meaning of Extended food privileges

Extended food privileges means: , (ex-TEN-did fud PRI-vi-le-jus) n., Getting on the good side of a friend and being rewarded with food.  “I got extended food privileges at Tom’s house.”  [Etym., 90’s youth culture]

Meaning of Grind-age

Grind-age means: 1) Noun. Food

Meaning of tuck

tuck means: Noun. Food. {Informal}

Meaning of snappin

snappin means: Noun. Food. [Stoke-on-Trent use]

Meaning of gasper

gasper means: Noun. A cigarette. [Early 1900s]

Meaning of scran

scran means: Noun. Food. [Northern use. Late 1800s]

Meaning of Preposition

Preposition means: A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Meaning of Early

Early means: In advance of the usual or appointed time; in good season; prior in time; among or near the first; -- opposed to late; as, the early bird; an early spring; early fruit.

Meaning of Aptote

Aptote means: A noun which has no distinction of cases; an indeclinable noun.

Meaning of Theme

Theme means: A noun or verb, not modified by inflections; also, that part of a noun or verb which remains unchanged (except by euphonic variations) in declension or conjugation; stem.

Meaning of Inflect

Inflect means: To vary, as a noun or a verb in its terminations; to decline, as a noun or adjective, or to conjugate, as a verb.

Meaning of Hastings

Hastings means: Early fruit or vegetables; especially, early pease.

Meaning of Early

Early means: Soon; in good season; seasonably; betimes; as, come early.

Meaning of Unseasonable

Unseasonable means: Not seasonable; being, done, or occurring out of the proper season; ill-timed; untimely; too early or too late; as, he called at an unseasonable hour; unseasonable advice; unseasonable frosts; unseasonable food.

Meaning of Case

Case means: One of the forms, or the inflections or changes of form, of a noun, pronoun, or adjective, which indicate its relation to other words, and in the aggregate constitute its declension; the relation which a noun or pronoun sustains to some other word.

Meaning of Which

Which means: A relative pronoun, used esp. in referring to an antecedent noun or clause, but sometimes with reference to what is specified or implied in a sentence, or to a following noun or clause (generally involving a reference, however, to something which has preceded). It is used in all numbers and genders, and was formerly used of persons.

Meaning of Income

Income means: That which is taken into the body as food; the ingesta; -- sometimes restricted to the nutritive, or digestible, portion of the food. See Food. Opposed to output.

Meaning of Rule

Rule means: A general principle concerning the formation or use of words, or a concise statement thereof; thus, it is a rule in England, that s or es , added to a noun in the singular number, forms the plural of that noun; but "man" forms its plural "men", and is an exception to the rule.

Meaning of Make

Make means: To bring about; to bring forward; to be the cause or agent of; to effect, do, perform, or execute; -- often used with a noun to form a phrase equivalent to the simple verb that corresponds to such noun; as, to make complaint, for to complain; to make record of, for to record; to make abode, for to abide, etc.

Meaning of Soil

Soil means: To feed, as cattle or horses, in the barn or an inclosure, with fresh grass or green food cut for them, instead of sending them out to pasture; hence (such food having the effect of purging them), to purge by feeding on green food; as, to soil a horse.

Meaning of Mess

Mess means: A quantity of food set on a table at one time; provision of food for a person or party for one meal; as, a mess of pottage; also, the food given to a beast at one time.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Appearance

Appearance means: A thing seed; a phenomenon; a phase; an apparition; as, an appearance in the sky.

Meaning of Engineering

Engineering means: of Engineer

Meaning of Ferment

Ferment means: That which causes fermentation, as yeast, barm, or fermenting beer.

Meaning of Limaille

Limaille means: Filings of metal.

Meaning of Premolar

Premolar means: An anterior molar tooth which has replaced a deciduous molar. See Tooth.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of ARTSY FARTSY

ARTSY FARTSY means: Artsy fartsy is American slang for someone pretentiously artistic.

Meaning of PEARLY GATE

PEARLY GATE means: Pearly gate is London Cockney rhyming slang for a dinner plate.

Meaning of SPANISH ONION

SPANISH ONION means: Spanish onion is London Cockney rhyming slang for a bunion. Spanish WaiterSpanish waiter is London Cockney rhyming slang for a potato.

Meaning of burgle

burgle means: v break into somewhere and nick stuff. Americans have the hilarious word “burglarize,” which means the same thing; for all I know, Yanks might refer to the event as burglarization. Or perhaps not.

Meaning of Roll with

Roll with means: hang out with

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