Slang meaning of tuck in

tuck in means: Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal}

What is the slang meaning/definition of tuck in ?

tuck in means: Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal}

Slang definition of tuck in

tuck in means: Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal}

More meanings / definitions of Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal} or words, sentences containing Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal}?

Luncheon (n.): A portion of food taken at any time except at a regular meal; an informal or light repast, as between breakfast and dinner.

Start (v. t.): To cause to move or act; to set going, running, or flowing; as, to start a railway train; to start a mill; to start a stream of water; to start a rumor; to start a business.

Auxiliary (sing.): A verb which helps to form the voices, modes, and tenses of other verbs; -- called, also, an auxiliary verb; as, have, be, may, can, do, must, shall, and will, in English; etre and avoir, in French; avere and essere, in Italian; estar and haber, in Spanish.

Love (n.): To have a feeling of love for; to regard with affection or good will; as, to love one's children and friends; to love one's country; to love one's God.

Tiffin (n.): A lunch, or slight repast between breakfast and dinner; -- originally, a Provincial English word, but introduced into India, and brought back to England in a special sense.

Amoret (n.): A love knot, love token, or love song. (pl.) Love glances or love tricks.

Informal (a.): Not in the regular, usual, or established form; not according to official, conventional, prescribed, or customary forms or rules; irregular; hence, without ceremony; as, an informal writting, proceeding, or visit.

Desiderative (n.): A verb formed from another verb by a change of termination, and expressing the desire of doing that which is indicated by the primitive verb.

Voice (n.): A particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs, or a particular form of a verb, by means of which is indicated the relation of the subject of the verb to the action which the verb expresses.

Amour (n.): Love making; a love affair; usually, an unlawful connection in love; a love intrigue; an illicit love affair.

Enthusiastical (a.): Filled with enthusiasm; characterized by enthusiasm; zealous; as, an enthusiastic lover of art.

Enthusiasm (n.): A state of impassioned emotion; transport; elevation of fancy; exaltation of soul; as, the poetry of enthusiasm.

Warmth (n.): A state of lively and excited interest; zeal; ardor; fervor; passion; enthusiasm; earnestness; as, the warmth of love or piety; he replied with much warmth.

Full (Compar.): Not wanting in any essential quality; complete, entire; perfect; adequate; as, a full narrative; a person of full age; a full stop; a full face; the full moon.

Enthusiasm (n.): Enkindled and kindling fervor of soul; strong excitement of feeling on behalf of a cause or a subject; ardent and imaginative zeal or interest; as, he engaged in his profession with enthusiasm.

Loveful (a.): Full of love.

Breakfast (v. t.): To furnish with breakfast.

Anglicize (v. t.): To make English; to English; to anglify; render conformable to the English idiom, or to English analogies.

Full (Compar.): Abundantly furnished or provided; sufficient in. quantity, quality, or degree; copious; plenteous; ample; adequate; as, a full meal; a full supply; a full voice; a full compensation; a house full of furniture.

Amative (a.): Full of love; amatory.

Charitable (a.): Full of love and good will; benevolent; kind.

Tucking (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Tuck

Love (n.): To take delight or pleasure in; to have a strong liking or desire for, or interest in; to be pleased with; to like; as, to love books; to love adventures.

To (prep.): As sign of the infinitive, to had originally the use of last defined, governing the infinitive as a verbal noun, and connecting it as indirect object with a preceding verb or adjective; thus, ready to go, i.e., ready unto going; good to eat, i.e., good for eating; I do my utmost to lead my life pleasantly. But it has come to be the almost constant prefix to the infinitive, even in situations where it has no prepositional meaning, as where the infinitive is direct object or subject; thus, I love to learn, i.e., I love learning; to die for one's country is noble, i.e., the dying for one's country. Where the infinitive denotes the design or purpose, good usage formerly allowed the prefixing of for to the to; as, what went ye out for see? (Matt. xi. 8).

Start (v. i.): To become somewhat displaced or loosened; as, a rivet or a seam may start under strain or pressure.

Start (v. t.): To pour out; to empty; to tap and begin drawing from; as, to start a water cask.

Dodge (v. i.): To start suddenly aside, as to avoid a blow or a missile; to shift place by a sudden start.

Start (v. i.): To set out; to commence a course, as a race or journey; to begin; as, to start business.

Participle (n.): A part of speech partaking of the nature both verb and adjective; a form of a verb, or verbal adjective, modifying a noun, but taking the adjuncts of the verb from which it is derived. In the sentences: a letter is written; being asleep he did not hear; exhausted by toil he will sleep soundly, -- written, being, and exhaustedare participles.

Start (v. t.): To move suddenly from its place or position; to displace or loosen; to dislocate; as, to start a bone; the storm started the bolts in the vessel.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal}?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal}

Meaning of tuck in

tuck in means: Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal}

Meaning of Fry-up or Full English

Fry-up or Full English means: Full English breakfast, usually with eggs, bacon, sausages, baked beans, grilled tomatoes and toast

Meaning of whack

whack means: Verb. 1. To promptly insert or place (something). E.g."Whack the contract in an envelope and send it off first post." 2. Hit or strike. {Informal}Noun. 1. A hard blow. {Informal} 2. When in the expressions 'full whack' or 'top whack', meaning maximum price or rate. {Informal}

Meaning of Burton (gone for a ...)

Burton (gone for a ...) means: I heard a woman on PBS's face The Nation discussing slang and "The Full Monty" was discussed. As an ex-Brit I understood it to refer to the full English breakfast that General Montgomery insisted upon daily, hence The Full... However she said that it came from a suit called a Montague which has three pieces and all the bells and whistles. Never heard of such a thing. What I do know is that Montague Burton is the largest chain of tailors in the UK. At the end of WW II and beyond, people leaving the armed services were given a week's pay and a voucher to take to Burtons for a new suit. Gradually the term "Going For a Burton" became synonymous with leaving, departing, and then evolved into dying as a result of an air crash or any other type of accent. It became very common with the National Servicemen (Draftees) of the 50's and 60's. It seems to have stayed with those generations. (ed: added verbatim - well done!)

Meaning of kick off

kick off means: Verb. 1. To start trouble. E.g. "If we don't keep the noise down he's going to kick-off again and call the police." 2. To begin. E.g."The meeting kicked off with a welcoming speech by the Managing Director." {Informal}

Meaning of bump start

bump start means: Verb. To help motivate, assist in promoting action. E.g."I think we need to bump start the project with an ideas session."

Meaning of whinge

whinge means: Verb. To persistently complain, in an irritating manner. {Informal}Noun. To act in the manner of the verb. {Informal}.

Meaning of dog’s breakfast

dog’s breakfast means: n something which has been made a complete mess of: When we finally got his tax return through it turned out it was a dog’s breakfast. Why the dog should have any worse breakfast than the rest of us, I have no idea.

Meaning of pong

pong means: Noun. An unpleasant smell. {Informal}Verb. To stink. {Informal}

Meaning of scoff

scoff means: Verb. To eat. {Informal}Noun. Food. {Informal}

Meaning of have it large

have it large means: Verb. Total enthusiasm and committment to enjoyment and hedonism. E.g."We were having it large last night in town, like nobody's business."

Meaning of WHEN PUSS BELLY FULL, RAT BATTY STINK

WHEN PUSS BELLY FULL, RAT BATTY STINK means: When things start looking up you forget where your coming from, in other words; "don't get rich and switch".

Meaning of row

row means: Noun. 1. A noisy quarrel. {Informal} 2. A loud noise. {Informal}Verb. To have a noisy quarrel. E.g."The neighbours have been rowing all night and I havent slept for the noise." {Informal}

Meaning of gleg

gleg means: Gleg was the Notts and Lincs verb for "look" as in "Let's have a gleg". It's obviously related to Old Norse gleggr, clear sighted, corresponding to Old English gleaw, clever; and Middle English "gleg of the eye", sharp-eyed.

Meaning of flake out

flake out means: Start acting peculiar, odd, eccentric. He was a good philosophy teacher before he fell in love with a hippy and flaked out.

Meaning of hot-wire

hot-wire means: Verb. To start up an engine without the aid of keys.

Meaning of slummock

slummock means: Noun. A dirty, untidy or lazy person. {Informal}Verb. To behave in a lazy and unkempt fashion. {Informal}

Meaning of swot

swot means: Noun. A person who studies hard. {Informal}Verb. To study hard. E.g."Timmy had been swotting for 3 months, but still failed his exams." {Informal}

Meaning of dog's breakfast

dog's breakfast means: Noun. A mess. E.g."I've made a bit of a dog's breakfast of that essay, and will probably have to rewrite it." Cf. 'dog's dinner'

Meaning of shift

shift means: Verb. 1. To move quickly. E.g."You should have seen him shift when I told him they were giving away free beer downstairs." {Informal} 2. To consume large amounts of drink or food. {Informal}

Meaning of Luncheon

Luncheon means: A portion of food taken at any time except at a regular meal; an informal or light repast, as between breakfast and dinner.

Meaning of Start

Start means: To cause to move or act; to set going, running, or flowing; as, to start a railway train; to start a mill; to start a stream of water; to start a rumor; to start a business.

Meaning of Auxiliary

Auxiliary means: A verb which helps to form the voices, modes, and tenses of other verbs; -- called, also, an auxiliary verb; as, have, be, may, can, do, must, shall, and will, in English; etre and avoir, in French; avere and essere, in Italian; estar and haber, in Spanish.

Meaning of Love

Love means: To have a feeling of love for; to regard with affection or good will; as, to love one's children and friends; to love one's country; to love one's God.

Meaning of Tiffin

Tiffin means: A lunch, or slight repast between breakfast and dinner; -- originally, a Provincial English word, but introduced into India, and brought back to England in a special sense.

Meaning of Amoret

Amoret means: A love knot, love token, or love song. (pl.) Love glances or love tricks.

Meaning of Informal

Informal means: Not in the regular, usual, or established form; not according to official, conventional, prescribed, or customary forms or rules; irregular; hence, without ceremony; as, an informal writting, proceeding, or visit.

Meaning of Desiderative

Desiderative means: A verb formed from another verb by a change of termination, and expressing the desire of doing that which is indicated by the primitive verb.

Meaning of Voice

Voice means: A particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs, or a particular form of a verb, by means of which is indicated the relation of the subject of the verb to the action which the verb expresses.

Meaning of Amour

Amour means: Love making; a love affair; usually, an unlawful connection in love; a love intrigue; an illicit love affair.

Meaning of Enthusiastical

Enthusiastical means: Filled with enthusiasm; characterized by enthusiasm; zealous; as, an enthusiastic lover of art.

Meaning of Enthusiasm

Enthusiasm means: A state of impassioned emotion; transport; elevation of fancy; exaltation of soul; as, the poetry of enthusiasm.

Meaning of Warmth

Warmth means: A state of lively and excited interest; zeal; ardor; fervor; passion; enthusiasm; earnestness; as, the warmth of love or piety; he replied with much warmth.

Meaning of Full

Full means: Not wanting in any essential quality; complete, entire; perfect; adequate; as, a full narrative; a person of full age; a full stop; a full face; the full moon.

Meaning of Enthusiasm

Enthusiasm means: Enkindled and kindling fervor of soul; strong excitement of feeling on behalf of a cause or a subject; ardent and imaginative zeal or interest; as, he engaged in his profession with enthusiasm.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Cadence

Cadence means: The close or fall of a strain; the point of rest, commonly reached by the immediate succession of the tonic to the dominant chord.

Meaning of Engager

Engager means: One who enters into an engagement or agreement; a surety.

Meaning of Pyrosulphate

Pyrosulphate means: A salt of pyrosulphuric acid.

Meaning of Reiterant

Reiterant means: Reiterating.

Meaning of Weft

Weft means: A web; a thing woven.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of BLINDO

BLINDO means: Blindo is British slang for drunk, intoxicated.

Meaning of SKAG

SKAG means: Skag (scag) is slang for a cigarette or cigarette stub. Skag (scag) is slang for the narcotic drug heroin.

Meaning of cider

cider means: n alcoholic apple juice. To Brits all cider is alcoholic — there’s no such thing as “hard cider” in Britain, and any non-alcoholic apple juice is called simply “apple juice.” Cider is often mixed with a small amount of blackcurrant syrup to form a drink imaginatively titled “Cider and black”.

Meaning of queen

queen means: an effeminate gay man

Tags: Slang Meaning of Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal}. The slang definition of Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal}. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal}? Please, add a definition of Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal} if you did not find one from a search of Verb. To eat, usually with enthusiasm. E.g."To start the day I love tucking into a full English breakfast." {Informal}.

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