Slang meaning of Allophone

Allophone means: A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.

What is the slang meaning/definition of Allophone ?

Allophone means: A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.

Slang definition of Allophone

Allophone means: A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.

More meanings / definitions of A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada. or words, sentences containing A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.?

Douay Bible (): A translation of the Scriptures into the English language for the use of English-speaking Roman Catholics; -- done from the Latin Vulgate by English scholars resident in France. The New Testament portion was published at Rheims, A. D. 1582, the Old Testament at Douai, A. D. 1609-10. Various revised editions have since been published.

-art (): The termination of many English words; as, coward, reynard, drunkard, mostly from the French, in which language this ending is of German origin, being orig. the same word as English hard. It usually has the sense of one who has to a high or excessive degree the quality expressed by the root; as, braggart, sluggard.

English (n.): The language of England or of the English nation, and of their descendants in America, India, and other countries.

Dollar (n.): A coin of the same general weight and value, though differing slightly in different countries, current in Mexico, Canada, parts of South America, also in Spain, and several other European countries.

Anglicize (v. t.): To make English; to English; to anglify; render conformable to the English idiom, or to English analogies.

Anglicism (n.): An English idiom; a phrase or form language peculiar to the English.

English (v. t.): To translate into the English language; to Anglicize; hence, to interpret; to explain.

Aune (n.): A French cloth measure, of different parts of the country (at Paris, 0.95 of an English ell); -- now superseded by the meter.

Par (prep.): By; with; -- used frequently in Early English in phrases taken from the French, being sometimes written as a part of the word which it governs; as, par amour, or paramour; par cas, or parcase; par fay, or parfay.

Abbe (n.): The French word answering to the English abbot, the head of an abbey; but commonly a title of respect given in France to every one vested with the ecclesiastical habit or dress.

Habitant (v. t.): An inhabitant or resident; -- a name applied to and denoting farmers of French descent or origin in Canada, especially in the Province of Quebec; -- usually in plural.

Anglo-Saxon (n.): The language of the English people before the Conquest (sometimes called Old English). See Saxon.

Analogue (n.): A word in one language corresponding with one in another; an analogous term; as, the Latin "pater" is the analogue of the English "father."

En- (): A prefix signifying in or into, used in many English words, chiefly those borrowed from the French. Some English words are written indifferently with en-or in-. For ease of pronunciation it is commonly changed to em-before p, b, and m, as in employ, embody, emmew. It is sometimes used to give a causal force, as in enable, enfeeble, to cause to be, or to make, able, or feeble; and sometimes merely gives an intensive force, as in enchasten. See In-.

Black letter (): The old English or Gothic letter, in which the Early English manuscripts were written, and the first English books were printed. It was conspicuous for its blackness. See Type.

Englishry (n.): A body of English or people of English descent; -- commonly applied to English people in Ireland.

Arpen (n.): Formerly, a measure of land in France, varying in different parts of the country. The arpent of Paris was 4,088 sq. yards, or nearly five sixths of an English acre. The woodland arpent was about 1 acre, 1 rood, 1 perch, English.

Byzantine (n.): A native or inhabitant of Byzantium, now Constantinople; sometimes, applied to an inhabitant of the modern city of Constantinople. C () C is the third letter of the English alphabet. It is from the Latin letter C, which in old Latin represented the sounds of k, and g (in go); its original value being the latter. In Anglo-Saxon words, or Old English before the Norman Conquest, it always has the sound of k. The Latin C was the same letter as the Greek /, /, and came from the Greek alphabet. The Greeks got it from the Ph/nicians. The English name of C is from the Latin name ce, and was derived, probably, through the French. Etymologically C is related to g, h, k, q, s (and other sibilant sounds). Examples of these relations are in L. acutus, E. acute, ague; E. acrid, eager, vinegar; L. cornu, E. horn; E. cat, kitten; E. coy, quiet; L. circare, OF. cerchier, E. search.

Anglo- (): A combining form meaning the same as English; or English and, or English conjoined with; as, Anglo-Turkish treaty, Anglo-German, Anglo-Irish.

Trochee (n.): A foot of two syllables, the first long and the second short, as in the Latin word ante, or the first accented and the second unaccented, as in the English word motion; a choreus.

Preposition (n.): A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Acre (n.): A piece of land, containing 160 square rods, or 4,840 square yards, or 43,560 square feet. This is the English statute acre. That of the United States is the same. The Scotch acre was about 1.26 of the English, and the Irish 1.62 of the English.

Indo-English (a.): Of or relating to the English who are born or reside in India; Anglo-Indian.

Anglicism (n.): The quality of being English; an English characteristic, custom, or method.

Sigma (n.): The Greek letter /, /, or / (English S, or s). It originally had the form of the English C.

Ell (n.): A measure for cloth; -- now rarely used. It is of different lengths in different countries; the English ell being 45 inches, the Dutch or Flemish ell 27, the Scotch about 37.

An (conj.): If; -- a word used by old English authors.

Th (): In Old English, the article the, when the following word began with a vowel, was often written with elision as if a part of the word. Thus in Chaucer, the forms thabsence, tharray, thegle, thend, thingot, etc., are found for the absence, the array, the eagle, the end, etc.

Mademoiselle (n.): A French title of courtesy given to a girl or an unmarried lady, equivalent to the English Miss.

Shall (v. i. & auxiliary.): As an auxiliary, shall indicates a duty or necessity whose obligation is derived from the person speaking; as, you shall go; he shall go; that is, I order or promise your going. It thus ordinarily expresses, in the second and third persons, a command, a threat, or a promise. If the auxillary be emphasized, the command is made more imperative, the promise or that more positive and sure. It is also employed in the language of prophecy; as, "the day shall come when . . . , " since a promise or threat and an authoritative prophecy nearly coincide in significance. In shall with the first person, the necessity of the action is sometimes implied as residing elsewhere than in the speaker; as, I shall suffer; we shall see; and there is always a less distinct and positive assertion of his volition than is indicated by will. "I shall go" implies nearly a simple futurity; more exactly, a foretelling or an expectation of my going, in which, naturally enough, a certain degree of plan or intention may be included; emphasize the shall, and the event is described as certain to occur, and the expression approximates in meaning to our emphatic "I will go." In a question, the relation of speaker and source of obligation is of course transferred to the person addressed; as, "Shall you go?" (answer, "I shall go"); "Shall he go?" i. e., "Do you require or promise his going?" (answer, "He shall go".) The same relation is transferred to either second or third person in such phrases as "You say, or think, you shall go;" "He says, or thinks, he shall go." After a conditional conjunction (as if, whether) shall is used in all persons to express futurity simply; as, if I, you, or he shall say they are right. Should is everywhere used in the same connection and the same senses as shall, as its imperfect. It also expresses duty or moral obligation; as, he should do it whether he will or not. In the early English, and hence in our English Bible, shall is the auxiliary mainly used, in all the persons, to express simple futurity. (Cf. Will, v. t.) Shall may be used elliptically; thus, with an adverb or other word expressive of motion go may be omitted.

Like to add another meaning or definition of A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.

Meaning of Allophone

Allophone means: A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.

Meaning of Allophone

Allophone means: A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.

Meaning of Allophone

Allophone means: A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.

Meaning of Au fait

Au fait means: Another one of those French expressions that have slipped into the English language. This one means to be familiar with something. I'd say at the end of reading all this you'd be au fait with the differences between American and English!

Meaning of Au fait

Au fait means: Another one of those French expressions that have slipped into the English language. This one means to be familiar with something. I'd say at the end of reading all this you'd be au fait with the differences between American and English!

Meaning of anglophone

anglophone means: A English speaking Canadian. Or a Canadian who doesn't speak French - only English.

Meaning of anglophone

anglophone means: A English speaking Canadian. Or a Canadian who doesn't speak French - only English.

Meaning of anglophone

anglophone means: A English speaking Canadian. Or a Canadian who doesn't speak French - only English.

Meaning of Matelot

Matelot means: A sailor, in the French language. English speaking sailors also use this term to describe an ordinary sailor. The term "Matey" was originally derived from this term.

Meaning of OMG (OMFG, etc.) 

OMG (OMFG, etc.)  means: (acr.) Oh My God! Typically used in America and other English-speaking countries, normally applying to a state of shock.

Meaning of choad, chode, choda

choad, chode, choda means: (1) penis that's wider than it is long (ed: weird... but it came in twice!!) (2) the skin located between the male reproductive organs (penis) and his anal opening (i.e arsehole). It was only located on guys. The contributor says this was the common meaning when he was a child, but he's never heard the other definition printed here but it might be right, I am not really certain. This meaning of the word is found in the U.S. prodominatly, but it is also used by children in the countries of England and other English speaking countries. Can be used as an insult, e.g. You choad licker.

Meaning of Pants

Pants means: CLOTHING RETAILERS TAKE NOTE: The Brits say ‘trousers’ … The American default word for the article of clothing that covers the legs and pelvic region seems pretty general and innocuous to English speakers in the U.S. To the actual English, however, ‘pants’ is the primary word they use for ‘underwear.’ And while American cinema and television typically writes the word ‘knickers’ for underwear into the vocabulary of British characters

Meaning of Sausage and Mash

Sausage and Mash means: Cash. I haven't got a sausage. A little bit different, but fairly common in many English speaking countries

Meaning of frigging

frigging means: More than just a substitute for the word 'fucking', this word has been in use in it's own right for hundreds of years and really doesn't constitute 'slang'. It is just another English language word for the sexual act that has come to be considered 'vulgar'.

Meaning of codswallop

codswallop means: n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse.

Meaning of vick

vick means: "Flick the vick". To stick your two fingers up at someone in an manner meant to be insulting. e.g. "I gave that maths teacher the vick this morning."'V' sign using two fingers has long been a signal of contempt. It originated during the interminable wars between the English and the French. The French were in awe of the English longbow-men. If the French managed to capture any of the bowmen, their practice was to sever the two "string" fingers of the right hand thus rendering them permanently incapable of using a bow.It thus became a symbol of contempt and derision for those English bowmen who still possessed their fingers, to wave them at the opposing side.During World War Two, Winston Churchill used it either way round, to signify "victory", and the shortened somewhat "politer" name of the action has since dropped into common useage since as "the vick", though the original expression "flick the vees" is still used in alongside the newer term.

Meaning of kiwi speak collection

kiwi speak collection means: The accent used by people in New Zealand is perceived to be a little strange by other countries around the world whose official language is English. In an effort to make their interpretation of the English language easier to follow, we present a list of words, pronunciation, and meanings. Just by following these easy steps you too can hold a conversation with a New Zealander. And what's more, you'll understand what it really means: BETTING: "Betting Gloves" are worn by betsmen in crucket. BRIST: Part of the human anatomy between the "nick" and the "billy". BUGGER: As in "mine is bugger than yours". CHULLY BUN: Chilly Bin, also known as an Esky. COME YOUSE: Former Australian Cricket Captain aka Kimberley John Hughes. DIMMER KRETZ: Those who believe in democracy. ERROR BUCK: Language spoken in countries like "Surria", "E-Jupp" and "Libernon". EKKA DYMOCKS: University staff. GUESS: Flammable vapour used in stoves. SENDLES: Thongs, open shoes. COLOUR: Terminator, murderer. CUSS: Kiss. DUCK HID: Term of abuse directed mainly at males. PHAR LAP: NZ's famous horse which was actually christened "PHILLIP". ERROR ROUTE: As in "Arnotts mulk error route buskets". FITTER CHENEY: A type of long flat pasta not to be confused with "rugger tony". (ed: anyone who has similar offerings to send in will receive our thanks)

Meaning of spanglish

spanglish means: A language which is a dialectical synthesis of the English and Spanish languages. Primarily spoken in the southwestern United States, and in the gulf and border states between the USA and Mexico. The application of this dialect is flexible and situational, as a "Spanglish" word or phrase does not exist or cannot be said completely in one language or the other.

Meaning of nought

nought means: n pron. “nawt” the digit zero. It’s an Old English word meaning “nothing” still used in northern regional English. Also occasionally used in the U.S., along with its more common American sibling, “aught.”

Meaning of knickers

knickers means: n women’s underpants. In old-fashioned English and American English, “knickers” (an abbreviation of the Dutch-derived word “knickerbockers”) are knee-length trousers most often seen nowadays on golfers.

Meaning of Douay Bible

Douay Bible means: A translation of the Scriptures into the English language for the use of English-speaking Roman Catholics; -- done from the Latin Vulgate by English scholars resident in France. The New Testament portion was published at Rheims, A. D. 1582, the Old Testament at Douai, A. D. 1609-10. Various revised editions have since been published.

Meaning of -art

-art means: The termination of many English words; as, coward, reynard, drunkard, mostly from the French, in which language this ending is of German origin, being orig. the same word as English hard. It usually has the sense of one who has to a high or excessive degree the quality expressed by the root; as, braggart, sluggard.

Meaning of English

English means: The language of England or of the English nation, and of their descendants in America, India, and other countries.

Meaning of Dollar

Dollar means: A coin of the same general weight and value, though differing slightly in different countries, current in Mexico, Canada, parts of South America, also in Spain, and several other European countries.

Meaning of Anglicize

Anglicize means: To make English; to English; to anglify; render conformable to the English idiom, or to English analogies.

Meaning of Anglicism

Anglicism means: An English idiom; a phrase or form language peculiar to the English.

Meaning of English

English means: To translate into the English language; to Anglicize; hence, to interpret; to explain.

Meaning of Aune

Aune means: A French cloth measure, of different parts of the country (at Paris, 0.95 of an English ell); -- now superseded by the meter.

Meaning of Par

Par means: By; with; -- used frequently in Early English in phrases taken from the French, being sometimes written as a part of the word which it governs; as, par amour, or paramour; par cas, or parcase; par fay, or parfay.

Meaning of Abbe

Abbe means: The French word answering to the English abbot, the head of an abbey; but commonly a title of respect given in France to every one vested with the ecclesiastical habit or dress.

Meaning of Habitant

Habitant means: An inhabitant or resident; -- a name applied to and denoting farmers of French descent or origin in Canada, especially in the Province of Quebec; -- usually in plural.

Meaning of Anglo-Saxon

Anglo-Saxon means: The language of the English people before the Conquest (sometimes called Old English). See Saxon.

Meaning of Analogue

Analogue means: A word in one language corresponding with one in another; an analogous term; as, the Latin "pater" is the analogue of the English "father."

Meaning of En-

En- means: A prefix signifying in or into, used in many English words, chiefly those borrowed from the French. Some English words are written indifferently with en-or in-. For ease of pronunciation it is commonly changed to em-before p, b, and m, as in employ, embody, emmew. It is sometimes used to give a causal force, as in enable, enfeeble, to cause to be, or to make, able, or feeble; and sometimes merely gives an intensive force, as in enchasten. See In-.

Meaning of Black letter

Black letter means: The old English or Gothic letter, in which the Early English manuscripts were written, and the first English books were printed. It was conspicuous for its blackness. See Type.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Atilt

Atilt means: In the position of a cask tilted, or with one end raised. [In this sense sometimes used as an adjective.]

Meaning of Finger

Finger means: Anything that does work of a finger; as, the pointer of a clock, watch, or other registering machine; especially (Mech.) a small projecting rod, wire, or piece, which is brought into contact with an object to effect, direct, or restrain a motion.

Meaning of Giambeux

Giambeux means: Greaves; armor for the legs.

Meaning of Misarranged

Misarranged means: of Misarrange

Meaning of Ross

Ross means: To divest of the ross, or rough, scaly surface; as, to ross bark.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of GR&D

GR&D means: Grinning Running & Ducking

Meaning of UNOTQUE

UNOTQUE means: marijuana

Meaning of BEND THE IRON

BEND THE IRON means: Change the position of the rust a switch. Also called bend or bend the rail

Meaning of hare-brained

hare-brained means: Stupid or foolish. Who was the hare-brain who put chewing gum on my seat?

Tags: Slang Meaning of A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.. The slang definition of A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.? Please, add a definition of A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada. if you did not find one from a search of A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada..

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