Slang meaning of Barn Burner

Barn Burner means: Originally in Sinatra slang this was a stylish, classy woman, but today, it can even be applied to a good football game.Hey, Quincy, did you see Stella over at the diner? Man, she is one amazing "barn burner."

What is the slang meaning/definition of Barn Burner ?

Barn Burner means: Originally in Sinatra slang this was a stylish, classy woman, but today, it can even be applied to a good football game.Hey, Quincy, did you see Stella over at the diner? Man, she is one amazing "barn burner."

Slang definition of Barn Burner

Barn Burner means: Originally in Sinatra slang this was a stylish, classy woman, but today, it can even be applied to a good football game.Hey, Quincy, did you see Stella over at the diner? Man, she is one amazing "barn burner."

More meanings / definitions of Originally in Sinatra slang this was a stylish, classy woman, but today, it can even be applied to a good football game.Hey, Quincy, did you see Stella over at the diner? Man, she is one amazing "barn burner." or words, sentences containing Originally in Sinatra slang this was a stylish, classy woman, but today, it can even be applied to a good football game.Hey, Quincy, did you see Stella over at the diner? Man, she is one amazing "barn burner."?

Football (n.): The game of kicking the football by opposing parties of players between goals.

-ster (): A suffix denoting the agent (originally a woman), especially a person who does something with skill or as an occupation; as in spinster (originally, a woman who spins), songster, baxter (= bakester), youngster.

Rounder (n.): An English game somewhat resembling baseball; also, another English game resembling the game of fives, but played with a football.

Farewell (interj.): Go well; good-by; adieu; -- originally applied to a person departing, but by custom now applied both to those who depart and those who remain. It is often separated by the pronoun; as, fare you well; and is sometimes used as an expression of separation only; as, farewell the year; farewell, ye sweet groves; that is, I bid you farewell.

Camping (n.): A game of football.

Amazing (a.): Causing amazement; very wonderful; as, amazing grace.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Stylish (a.): Having style or artistic quality; given to, or fond of, the display of style; highly fashionable; modish; as, a stylish dress, house, manner.

Gentlewoman (n.): A woman of good family or of good breeding; a woman above the vulgar.

Camp (n.): An ancient game of football, played in some parts of England.

Bude burner (): A burner consisting of two or more concentric Argand burners (the inner rising above the outer) and a central tube by which oxygen gas or common air is supplied.

Setter (n.): A hunting dog of a special breed originally derived from a cross between the spaniel and the pointer. Modern setters are usually trained to indicate the position of game birds by standing in a fixed position, but originally they indicated it by sitting or crouching.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Bunsen's burner (): See under Battery, and Burner.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Barn (n.): A covered building used chiefly for storing grain, hay, and other productions of a farm. In the United States a part of the barn is often used for stables.

Tasty (superl.): Having a good taste; -- applied to persons; as, a tasty woman. See Taste, n., 5.

Tester (n.): An old French silver coin, originally of the value of about eighteen pence, subsequently reduced to ninepence, and later to sixpence, sterling. Hence, in modern English slang, a sixpence; -- often contracted to tizzy. Called also teston.

Tip (n.): An end piece or part; a piece, as a cap, nozzle, ferrule, or point, applied to the extreme end of anything; as, a tip for an umbrella, a shoe, a gas burner, etc.

Solitaire (n.): A game which one person can play alone; -- applied to many games of cards, etc.; also, to a game played on a board with pegs or balls, in which the object is, beginning with all the places filled except one, to remove all but one of the pieces by "jumping," as in draughts.

Prince (a.): The one of highest rank; one holding the highest place and authority; a sovereign; a monarch; -- originally applied to either sex, but now rarely applied to a female.

American (n.): A native of America; -- originally applied to the aboriginal inhabitants, but now applied to the descendants of Europeans born in America, and especially to the citizens of the United States.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Reticule (n..): A little bag, originally of network; a woman's workbag, or a little bag to be carried in the hand.

Diner (n.): One who dines.

Good (superl.): Not small, insignificant, or of no account; considerable; esp., in the phrases a good deal, a good way, a good degree, a good share or part, etc.

Putting (n.): The throwing of a heavy stone, shot, etc., with the hand raised or extended from the shoulder; -- originally, a Scottish game.

To (prep.): As sign of the infinitive, to had originally the use of last defined, governing the infinitive as a verbal noun, and connecting it as indirect object with a preceding verb or adjective; thus, ready to go, i.e., ready unto going; good to eat, i.e., good for eating; I do my utmost to lead my life pleasantly. But it has come to be the almost constant prefix to the infinitive, even in situations where it has no prepositional meaning, as where the infinitive is direct object or subject; thus, I love to learn, i.e., I love learning; to die for one's country is noble, i.e., the dying for one's country. Where the infinitive denotes the design or purpose, good usage formerly allowed the prefixing of for to the to; as, what went ye out for see? (Matt. xi. 8).

Diner-out (n.): One who often takes his dinner away from home, or in company.

Swellish (a.): Dandified; stylish.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Originally in Sinatra slang this was a stylish, classy woman, but today, it can even be applied to a good football game.Hey, Quincy, did you see Stella over at the diner? Man, she is one amazing "barn burner."?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Originally in Sinatra slang this was a stylish, classy woman, but today, it can even be applied to a good football game.Hey, Quincy, did you see Stella over at the diner? Man, she is one amazing "barn burner."

Meaning of Barn Burner

Barn Burner means: Originally in Sinatra slang this was a stylish, classy woman, but today, it can even be applied to a good football game.Hey, Quincy, did you see Stella over at the diner? Man, she is one amazing "barn burner."

Meaning of classy chassis

classy chassis means: Great female figure. Portia Radclyffe is too classy to take out to a diner.

Meaning of classy

classy means: High-class, tasteful. Portia Radclyffe is too classy to take out to a diner.

Meaning of CLASSY

CLASSY means: Classy is slang for elegant, stylish.

Meaning of CLASSY CHASSIS

CLASSY CHASSIS means: Classy Chassis is Black−American slang for an attractive woman's body.

Meaning of SWANKY

SWANKY means: Swanky is slang for swaggering, pretentious, boastful when applied to a person or imposing, stylish or posh when applied to a building etc.

Meaning of KETCHY-CHUBY

KETCHY-CHUBY means: It can be a sexual term meaning the man throw it and the woman catch it! It can also mean a game - life's game, how to see through today to meet tomorrowand all the games of life as in "life is just a ketchy-chuby game."

Meaning of Fantabulous

Fantabulous means: It's basically Fantastic and Fabuluos put together it's something that is sarcastically good! Also I just wanted to say how amazing it was to see how many of these words are still used today. I'm 13 and i use alot of these words and it just surprises me!!!!!

Meaning of football

football means: n soccer. Americans call a different game “football.” It doesn’t require much involvement from feet, and they don’t have a proper ball. Brits call that “American football.” I have a theory about the relative popularities of soccer in the U.K. and American football in the U.S., upon which I shall now expound. In life in general, British people tend to put up with the status quo and keep their fingers crossed, rather than make any conscious effort towards striving for success. Until success lands miraculously upon their doorstep, Brits will pass the time moaning about how difficult their lives are. Americans, on the other hand, like to feel that they’re entirely in control of their own destiny and can shape it in any way they see fit. Americans will go out actively seeking success, and until it arrives they will mercilessly criticise themselves for not trying hard enough to find it. Bear with me, the point is approaching. Soccer is a game with very low scores – it’s not uncommon for a game to end with no scoring at all by either team. American football, on the other hand, has scoring aplenty. The net result of this is that a fairly poor soccer team can win a game just by being a bit lucky. This proves to Brits that success truly is a random thing, and they just need to keep waiting. A bad American football team will never win a game. This proves to Americans that hard work pays off, and that they should continue to better themselves in whatever way they can.

Meaning of Tongs

Tongs means: Household instrument put to good use at a Barbie 2. The originally applied to sheep shearing shears

Meaning of steez, stee, steelo

steez, stee, steelo means: Anything that is amazing or really good. sometimes replaces "stuff", "style" and "thing". For example, "That skater has a mad steelo.", "I saw some mad stee at the mall today.", "He has the steez in his bag!". This is most defintely a skater term. only good skaters are alowed to use it, if any non-skaters or crappy skaters use it they are dubbed posers instantly.

Meaning of Nelson (Mandela)

Nelson (Mandela) means: Noun. A drink of Stella, a lager produced by Stella Artois. Rhyming slang.

Meaning of bounder

bounder means: n person who is generally no good, a bad egg. It’s very old-fashioned — even Rudyard Kipling would probably have used it in jest. One rather dubious etymology is that it was applied pre–Great War to golfers who used new American golf balls (similar to modern golf balls) instead of the more traditional leather-covered ones. They had a more enthusiastic bounce and the use of such balls was not banned by the rules but was considered bad sportsmanship, perhaps even a little underhanded. The term was originally applied to the ball itself, and only later to the user of such a ball.

Meaning of chinese football

chinese football means: (1) A game played with a football in which players attempt to reduce other players "lives" by kicking the ball at the upper-body but without the ball being caught. One kick is allowed per player who may then not touch the ball until another player has done so. (2) A variation of this game in which beatings are administered instead of lives lost.

Meaning of Barn Owl

Barn Owl means: Row (argument). Went up to the dole office today. 'Ad a bit of a barney with the geezer behind the desk. Not satisfied with the slang, the word is extended to 'Barney' to thoroughly confuse everyone.

Meaning of Field day

Field day means: (1) Originally a day for cleaning all parts of the vessel. (2 ) The expression used today is a reference to a good time; "Have a field day".

Meaning of footy

footy means: Noun. The game of football, or a football itself.

Meaning of empty

empty means: When someone would be free of any markers during a game of playground football. For example, a call of "I'm empty" would suggest that that person is unmarked and in a good position to shoot.

Meaning of GAME

GAME means: 1- To have rap or the words to talk to a fly girl. Or to have words to get out of trouble or a situation. (exam. "them police tried to grab me but talked them out of it, I got too much game for them") 2- To be down to do something, or ready to forward in a situation. 3- To be good at basketball, to always have a good game.

Meaning of GAME

GAME means: 1- To have rap or the words to talk to a fly girl. Or to have words to get out of trouble or a situation. (exam. "them police tried to grab me but talked them out of it, I got too much game for them") 2- To be down to do something, or ready to forward in a situation. 3- To be good at basketball, to always have a good game.

Meaning of Football

Football means: The game of kicking the football by opposing parties of players between goals.

Meaning of -ster

-ster means: A suffix denoting the agent (originally a woman), especially a person who does something with skill or as an occupation; as in spinster (originally, a woman who spins), songster, baxter (= bakester), youngster.

Meaning of Rounder

Rounder means: An English game somewhat resembling baseball; also, another English game resembling the game of fives, but played with a football.

Meaning of Farewell

Farewell means: Go well; good-by; adieu; -- originally applied to a person departing, but by custom now applied both to those who depart and those who remain. It is often separated by the pronoun; as, fare you well; and is sometimes used as an expression of separation only; as, farewell the year; farewell, ye sweet groves; that is, I bid you farewell.

Meaning of Camping

Camping means: A game of football.

Meaning of Amazing

Amazing means: Causing amazement; very wonderful; as, amazing grace.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Stylish

Stylish means: Having style or artistic quality; given to, or fond of, the display of style; highly fashionable; modish; as, a stylish dress, house, manner.

Meaning of Gentlewoman

Gentlewoman means: A woman of good family or of good breeding; a woman above the vulgar.

Meaning of Camp

Camp means: An ancient game of football, played in some parts of England.

Meaning of Bude burner

Bude burner means: A burner consisting of two or more concentric Argand burners (the inner rising above the outer) and a central tube by which oxygen gas or common air is supplied.

Meaning of Setter

Setter means: A hunting dog of a special breed originally derived from a cross between the spaniel and the pointer. Modern setters are usually trained to indicate the position of game birds by standing in a fixed position, but originally they indicated it by sitting or crouching.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Bunsen's burner

Bunsen's burner means: See under Battery, and Burner.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Deprecatingly

Deprecatingly means: In a deprecating manner.

Meaning of Proliferous

Proliferous means: Producing young by budding.

Meaning of Pyrexia

Pyrexia means: The febrile condition.

Meaning of Underneath

Underneath means: Beneath; below; in a lower place; under; as, a channel underneath the soil.

Meaning of Vital

Vital means: Belonging or relating to life, either animal or vegetable; as, vital energies; vital functions; vital actions.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of SHERMAN

SHERMAN means: Sherman (shortened from Sherman tank) is British rhyming slang for mastrubate.

Meaning of fi'n

fi'n means: v. (derived from "fixin") Getting ready to do something.  "I'm fi'n to tell you what's up wit Sheila and Snoopy." 

Meaning of Hot one

Hot one means: Bowl of chili soup

Meaning of Longers And Lingers

Longers And Lingers means: Fingers

Meaning of Dynamite

Dynamite means: Whiskey.

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