Slang meaning of CARCASS TRADE

CARCASS TRADE means: Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques.

What is the slang meaning/definition of CARCASS TRADE ?

CARCASS TRADE means: Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques.

Slang definition of CARCASS TRADE

CARCASS TRADE means: Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques.

Trending & Popular Articles
It’s quite a challenging task to calculate and fill up business taxes. Complexity of the tax law differs from location to location. Tax law of Poland is...
Bouncy castles, which are also known as jumping castles, have great benefits. These are also called inflatable castles, which are meant for children and/or...
The crucial step in improving your finance is to examine your attitudes toward money. The question is, how can I increase my income and reduce my expenditure?...
Rice is eaten and cultivated all over the world. There are different types of rice that are also different in terms of their health benefits. The various types...

More meanings / definitions of Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques. or words, sentences containing Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques.?

Veneer (v. t.): To overlay or plate with a thin layer of wood or other material for outer finish or decoration; as, to veneer a piece of furniture with mahogany. Used also figuratively.

Scaleboard (n.): A thin veneer of leaf of wood used for covering the surface of articles of furniture, and the like.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Rookery (n.): A dilapidated building with many rooms and occupants; a cluster of dilapidated or mean buildings.

Cross-banded (a.): A term used when a narrow ribbon of veneer is inserted into the surface of any piece of furniture, wainscoting, etc., so that the grain of it is contrary to the general surface.

Practice (v. t.): To exercise, or follow, as a profession, trade, art, etc., as, to practice law or medicine.

Doublet (a.): A counterfeit gem, composed of two pieces of crystal, with a color them, and thus giving the appearance of a naturally colored gem. Also, a piece of paste or glass covered by a veneer of real stone.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Frieze (n.): Any sculptured or richly ornamented band in a building or, by extension, in rich pieces of furniture. See Illust. of Column.

Equipage (n.): Furniture or outfit, whether useful or ornamental; especially, the furniture and supplies of a vessel, fitting her for a voyage or for warlike purposes, or the furniture and necessaries of an army, a body of troops, or a single soldier, including whatever is necessary for efficient service; equipments; accouterments; habiliments; attire.

Jockey (n.): A cheat; one given to sharp practice in trade.

Trade (v.): Course; custom; practice; occupation; employment.

Harlotry (n.): The trade or practice of prostitution; habitual or customary lewdness.

Trade (v.): A company of men engaged in the same occupation; thus, booksellers and publishers speak of the customs of the trade, and are collectively designated as the trade.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Furniture (v. t.): Pieces of wood or metal of a lesser height than the type, placed around the pages or other matter in a form, and, with the quoins, serving to secure the form in its place in the chase.

Pass (v. i.): Permission or license to pass, or to go and come; a psssport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission; as, a railroad or theater pass; a military pass.

Practice (n.): A easy and concise method of applying the rules of arithmetic to questions which occur in trade and business.

Antiquist (n.): An antiquary; a collector of antiques.

Cabinetwork (n.): The art or occupation of working upon wooden furniture requiring nice workmanship; also, such furniture.

Cradling (n.): Cutting a cask into two pieces lengthwise, to enable it to pass a narrow place, the two parts being afterward united and rehooped.

Pass (v. i.): To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one point to another; to make a transit; -- usually with a following adverb or adverbal phrase defining the kind or manner of motion; as, to pass on, by, out, in, etc.; to pass swiftly, directly, smoothly, etc.; to pass to the rear, under the yoke, over the bridge, across the field, beyond the border, etc.

Trade (v.): The business which a person has learned, and which he engages in, for procuring subsistence, or for profit; occupation; especially, mechanical employment as distinguished from the liberal arts, the learned professions, and agriculture; as, we speak of the trade of a smith, of a carpenter, or mason, but not now of the trade of a farmer, or a lawyer, or a physician.

Furnishment (n.): The act of furnishing, or of supplying furniture; also, furniture.

Traffic (v. i.): To pass goods and commodities from one person to another for an equivalent in goods or money; to buy or sell goods; to barter; to trade.

Practice (n.): Frequently repeated or customary action; habitual performance; a succession of acts of a similar kind; usage; habit; custom; as, the practice of rising early; the practice of making regular entries of accounts; the practice of daily exercise.

Cover (n.): A tablecloth, and the other table furniture; esp., the table furniture for the use of one person at a meal; as, covers were laid for fifty guests.

Reconstructive (a.): Reconstructing; tending to reconstruct; as, a reconstructive policy.

Pass (v. t.): To cause to pass the lips; to utter; to pronounce; hence, to promise; to pledge; as, to pass sentence.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques.

Meaning of CARCASS TRADE

CARCASS TRADE means: Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques.

Meaning of BOMB

BOMB means: Bomb is British slang for a large sum of money. Bomb is British slang for a major storm at sea.Bomb is British slang for to jump into water making a splash. Bomb is British slang for to travel at high speed.Bomb is Australian and New Zealand slang for an old or dilapidated motorcar. Bomb is American slang for to cover a wall with graffiti.Bomb is American football slang for a very long pass. Bomb is American computer slang for to fail miserably. Bomb is street slang for best.

Meaning of FACE FURNITURE

FACE FURNITURE means: Face furniture is British slang for spectacles.

Meaning of ROUGH TRADE

ROUGH TRADE means: Rough Trade is British slang for a prostitute's violent or sadistic customer.Rough trade is homosexual slang for a tough or violent sexual partner, especially a lorry driver,construction worker, or docker, casually picked up.

Meaning of PARK ONE'S CARCASS

PARK ONE'S CARCASS means: Park one's carcass is slang for sit down.

Meaning of TRADE

TRADE means: Trade is slang for a prostitute's client.Trade is homosexual slang for a sexual partner or sexual partners collectively.

Meaning of Short Splice

Short Splice means: To permanently join two pieces of rope. It will not pass through a block since it increases the diameter

Meaning of Magpie

Magpie means: A large black bird that has a practice of swooping down and pecking the heads of people who pass by its domain

Meaning of SKIP

SKIP means: Skip is slang for an escape. Skip is slang for an escapee. Skip is British slang for a boss.Skip is British slang for a place to sleep.Skip is British slang for an old, dilapidated or cheap vehicle.

Meaning of PIECES OF EIGHT

PIECES OF EIGHT means: Pieces of eight is London Cockney rhyming slang for weight.

Meaning of ON THE KNOCKER

ON THE KNOCKER means: On the knocker is British slang for going from door to door trying to sell something of dubious value or to persuade the gullible to sell antiques or other items for far less than their worth.

Meaning of SMOKER

SMOKER means: Smoker is British slang for a dilapidated old car.

Meaning of BY PASS

BY PASS means: By pass is London Cockney rhyming slang for the buttocks (arse).

Meaning of Take a raincheck

Take a raincheck means: This is an Americanism that dates back to the 1880s and references the practice of giving baseball game ticketholders a pass to a game that must be rescheduled due to weather. It’s commonly used as a metaphor for postponing or rescheduling a meeting between people to some later date that is more convenient.

Meaning of sculp

sculp means: the skin and under layer of fat seperated from the carcass of a seal.

Meaning of TINIES

TINIES means: Tinies is British slang for pieces of excrement caught on anal hairs.

Meaning of THE LUMP

THE LUMP means: The lump is British slang for the casual work system in the building trade.

Meaning of PASS MUSTER

PASS MUSTER means: Pass muster is American slang for to meet required standards, expectations, or approval.

Meaning of Pieces of Eight

Pieces of Eight means: Weight. She'd better watch her pieces of eight

Meaning of Reef Lines

Reef Lines means: Short pieces of line fastened to the sail at reef points, used for tying a reef to reduce sail area. The reef line will pass through reef cringles, which will become the new tack and clew of the reefed sail.

Meaning of Veneer

Veneer means: To overlay or plate with a thin layer of wood or other material for outer finish or decoration; as, to veneer a piece of furniture with mahogany. Used also figuratively.

Meaning of Scaleboard

Scaleboard means: A thin veneer of leaf of wood used for covering the surface of articles of furniture, and the like.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Rookery

Rookery means: A dilapidated building with many rooms and occupants; a cluster of dilapidated or mean buildings.

Meaning of Cross-banded

Cross-banded means: A term used when a narrow ribbon of veneer is inserted into the surface of any piece of furniture, wainscoting, etc., so that the grain of it is contrary to the general surface.

Meaning of Practice

Practice means: To exercise, or follow, as a profession, trade, art, etc., as, to practice law or medicine.

Meaning of Doublet

Doublet means: A counterfeit gem, composed of two pieces of crystal, with a color them, and thus giving the appearance of a naturally colored gem. Also, a piece of paste or glass covered by a veneer of real stone.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Meaning of Frieze

Frieze means: Any sculptured or richly ornamented band in a building or, by extension, in rich pieces of furniture. See Illust. of Column.

Meaning of Equipage

Equipage means: Furniture or outfit, whether useful or ornamental; especially, the furniture and supplies of a vessel, fitting her for a voyage or for warlike purposes, or the furniture and necessaries of an army, a body of troops, or a single soldier, including whatever is necessary for efficient service; equipments; accouterments; habiliments; attire.

Meaning of Jockey

Jockey means: A cheat; one given to sharp practice in trade.

Meaning of Trade

Trade means: Course; custom; practice; occupation; employment.

Meaning of Harlotry

Harlotry means: The trade or practice of prostitution; habitual or customary lewdness.

Meaning of Trade

Trade means: A company of men engaged in the same occupation; thus, booksellers and publishers speak of the customs of the trade, and are collectively designated as the trade.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Bared

Bared means: of Bare

Meaning of Life

Life means: The potential principle, or force, by which the organs of animals and plants are started and continued in the performance of their several and cooperative functions; the vital force, whether regarded as physical or spiritual.

Meaning of Parlous

Parlous means: Venturesome; bold; mischievous; keen.

Meaning of Pentacrinus

Pentacrinus means: A genus of large, stalked crinoids, of which several species occur in deep water among the West Indies and elsewhere.

Meaning of Vends

Vends means: See Wends.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of GET A LOAD OF

GET A LOAD OF means: Get a load of is slang for to look at.

Meaning of horse

horse means: Heroine. I haven't been horny since I started taking that antidepressant.

Meaning of dinarly/dinarla/dinaly

dinarly/dinarla/dinaly means: a shilling (1/-), from the mid-1800s, also transferred later to the decimal equivalent 5p piece, from the same roots that produced the 'deaner' shilling slang and variations, i.e., Roman denarius and then through other European dinar coins and variations. As with deanar the pronunciation emphasis tends to be on the long second syllable 'aah' sound.

Tags: Slang Meaning of Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques.. The slang definition of Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques.? Please, add a definition of Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques. if you did not find one from a search of Carcass trade is British slang for the practice of reconstructing dilapidated pieces of old furniture with new veneer to pass them off as antiques..

Copyrights © 2016 LingoMash. All Rights Reserved.