Slang meaning of Twee

Twee means: - Twee is a word you would generally hear older people say. It means dainty or quaint. A bit like the way you chaps think of England I suppose.

What is the slang meaning/definition of Twee ?

Twee means: - Twee is a word you would generally hear older people say. It means dainty or quaint. A bit like the way you chaps think of England I suppose.

Slang definition of Twee

Twee means: - Twee is a word you would generally hear older people say. It means dainty or quaint. A bit like the way you chaps think of England I suppose.

More meanings / definitions of - Twee is a word you would generally hear older people say. It means dainty or quaint. A bit like the way you chaps think of England I suppose. or words, sentences containing - Twee is a word you would generally hear older people say. It means dainty or quaint. A bit like the way you chaps think of England I suppose.?

Quaint (a.): Curious and fanciful; affected; odd; whimsical; antique; archaic; singular; unusual; as, quaint architecture; a quaint expression.

Hear (v. t.): To perceive by the ear; to apprehend or take cognizance of by the ear; as, to hear sounds; to hear a voice; to hear one call.

People (n.): Persons, generally; an indefinite number of men and women; folks; population, or part of population; as, country people; -- sometimes used as an indefinite subject or verb, like on in French, and man in German; as, people in adversity.

Hear (v. t.): To attend, or be present at, as hearer or worshiper; as, to hear a concert; to hear Mass.

Anglo-Saxon (n.): The Teutonic people (Angles, Saxons, Jutes) of England, or the English people, collectively, before the Norman Conquest.

Hear (v. t.): To give audience or attention to; to listen to; to heed; to accept the doctrines or advice of; to obey; to examine; to try in a judicial court; as, to hear a recitation; to hear a class; the case will be heard to-morrow.

Conjugate (n.): A word agreeing in derivation with another word, and therefore generally resembling it in signification.

Enclitical (v. i.): Affixed; subjoined; -- said of a word or particle which leans back upon the preceding word so as to become a part of it, and to lose its own independent accent, generally varying also the accent of the preceding word.

Perceive (v. t.): To obtain knowledge of through the senses; to receive impressions from by means of the bodily organs; to take cognizance of the existence, character, or identity of, by means of the senses; to see, hear, or feel; as, to perceive a distant ship; to perceive a discord.

Earwitness (n.): A witness by means of his ears; one who is within hearing and does hear; a hearer.

Folks (n. collect. & pl.): People in general, or a separate class of people; -- generally used in the plural form, and often with a qualifying adjective; as, the old folks; poor folks.

Assume (v. t.): To take for granted, or without proof; to suppose as a fact; to suppose or take arbitrarily or tentatively.

Presume (v. t.): To take or suppose to be true, or entitled to belief, without examination or proof, or on the strength of probability; to take for granted; to infer; to suppose.

English (n.): Collectively, the people of England; English people or persons.

Whig (n.): One of a political party which grew up in England in the seventeenth century, in the reigns of Charles I. and II., when great contests existed respecting the royal prerogatives and the rights of the people. Those who supported the king in his high claims were called Tories, and the advocates of popular rights, of parliamentary power over the crown, and of toleration to Dissenters, were, after 1679, called Whigs. The terms Liberal and Radical have now generally superseded Whig in English politics. See the note under Tory.

Taconic (a.): Designating, or pertaining to, the series of rocks forming the Taconic mountains in Western New England. They were once supposed to be older than the Cambrian, but later proved to belong to the Lower Silurian and Cambrian.

Overhear (v. t.): To hear more of (anything) than was intended to be heard; to hear by accident or artifice.

Gentry (a.): People of education and good breeding; in England, in a restricted sense, those between the nobility and the yeomanry.

Suppose (v. t.): To represent to one's self, or state to another, not as true or real, but as if so, and with a view to some consequence or application which the reality would involve or admit of; to imagine or admit to exist, for the sake of argument or illustration; to assume to be true; as, let us suppose the earth to be the center of the system, what would be the result?

Popularly (adv.): In a popular manner; so as to be generally favored or accepted by the people; commonly; currently; as, the story was popularity reported.

Imaginative (a.): Proceeding from, and characterized by, the imagination, generally in the highest sense of the word.

Ritualism (n.): Specifically :(a) The principles and practices of those in the Church of England, who in the development of the Oxford movement, so-called, have insisted upon a return to the use in church services of the symbolic ornaments (altar cloths, encharistic vestments, candles, etc.) that were sanctioned in the second year of Edward VI., and never, as they maintain, forbidden by competennt authority, although generally disused. Schaff-Herzog Encyc. (b) Also, the principles and practices of those in the Protestant Episcopal Church who sympathize with this party in the Church of England.

Saxon (n.): One of a nation or people who formerly dwelt in the northern part of Germany, and who, with other Teutonic tribes, invaded and conquered England in the fifth and sixth centuries.

Stonehenge (n.): An assemblage of upright stones with others placed horizontally on their tops, on Salisbury Plain, England, -- generally supposed to be the remains of an ancient Druidical temple.

Hanoverian (a.): Of or pertaining to Hanover or its people, or to the House of Hanover in England.

Underchaps (n. pl.): The lower chaps or jaw.

Last (n.): A load; a heavy burden; hence, a certain weight or measure, generally estimated at 4,000 lbs., but varying for different articles and in different countries. In England, a last of codfish, white herrings, meal, or ashes, is twelve barrels; a last of corn, ten quarters, or eighty bushels, in some parts of England, twenty-one quarters; of gunpowder, twenty-four barrels, each containing 100 lbs; of red herrings, twenty cades, or 20,000; of hides, twelve dozen; of leather, twenty dickers; of pitch and tar, fourteen barrels; of wool, twelve sacks; of flax or feathers, 1,700 lbs.

Benedicite (n.): A canticle (the Latin version of which begins with this word) which may be used in the order for morning prayer in the Church of England. It is taken from an apocryphal addition to the third chapter of Daniel.

Latitudinarian (n.): A member of the Church of England, in the time of Charles II., who adopted more liberal notions in respect to the authority, government, and doctrines of the church than generally prevailed.

People (v. t.): To stock with people or inhabitants; to fill as with people; to populate.

Like to add another meaning or definition of - Twee is a word you would generally hear older people say. It means dainty or quaint. A bit like the way you chaps think of England I suppose.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to - Twee is a word you would generally hear older people say. It means dainty or quaint. A bit like the way you chaps think of England I suppose.

Meaning of Twee

Twee means: - Twee is a word you would generally hear older people say. It means dainty or quaint. A bit like the way you chaps think of England I suppose.

Meaning of Twee

Twee means: Twee is a word you would generally hear older people say. It means dainty or quaint. A bit like the way you chaps think of England I suppose.

Meaning of As well

As well means: You chaps say also when we would say "too" or "as well". For instance if my friend ordered a Miller Lite, I would say "I'll have one as well". I often heard people saying something like "I'll have one also". You'd be more likely to hear someone in England ordering a pint of lager!

Meaning of As well

As well means: You chaps say also when we would say "too" or "as well". For instance if my friend ordered a Miller Lite, I would say "I'll have one as well". I often heard people saying something like "I'll have one also". You'd be more likely to hear someone in England ordering a pint of lager!

Meaning of Give us a bell

Give us a bell means: This simply means call me. You often hear people use the word "us" to mean "me".

Meaning of Give us a bell

Give us a bell means: This simply means call me. You often hear people use the word "us" to mean "me".

Meaning of Jolly

Jolly means: - You hear people use this in all sorts of ways, but basically it means very. So "jolly good" would mean very good. A common exception is where you hear people say "I should jolly well think so!" which is more to emphasise the point.

Meaning of Jolly

Jolly means: You hear people use this in all sorts of ways, but basically it means very. So "jolly good" would mean very good. A common exception is where you hear people say "I should jolly well think so!" which is more to emphasise the point.

Meaning of Maintain

Maintain means: main-tain: the word was generally pronounced with a slight halt after the first syllable. A word of caution to someone who is slightly paniced, generally from drug usage. Maintain composure. Generally uttered in unison before the policemen approaches your car during a night of marijuana smoking.

Meaning of Bugger

Bugger means: originally used to refer to two men having intercourse and was the B word instead of the modern day F word. ‘Bugger’ is now often used as ‘bummer’ meaning ‘what a shame’, a few years ago a Toyota TV commercial drew some criticism from older people for repeating the word ‘bugger’ about 25 times in half a minute. Something that is broken can be ‘buggered’ and someone can tell you to ‘bugger off’ and a person who has bad luck can be described as ‘a poor bugger’.

Meaning of gool, gools, glue

gool, gools, glue means: These words were used interchangeably as the term meaning "home base" when playing tag. When the game of tag began, someone would specify what Gool or Glue would be, and that object would be the home base where one could be "safe" from being tagged. Similar to 'Base'. Alternative viewpoint: I grew up in New England in the late 70's and the term "gools" was completely ubiquitous as a singular noun. "Glue" was never used to mean "home base", but if "gool" was used, I never noticed. It's possible that "gools" evolved from "gool" through the expression "No gool(s) sticking!" (ie. don't hover around home base because it doesn't give other players a fair chance of reaching it.) Even as an adult, if talk of childhood games ever comes up with peers who grew up in different parts of New England, there's a nostalgic spark if "gools" (and notably not "gool") is mentioned as we all immediately recognize the word and at the same time note what a silly word it really is. (ed: which opened the door as usual for additional input and Arrigo sent the following in!) I am happy to see that the word gools appears in your dictionary. It was the first thing I thought of when I found out about your site, and, sure enough, there it was. It is erroneous to say it originated in the 1970s because the term was around the Phineas Bates elementary school in Roslindale Massachusetts (a neighborhood in Boston) in the 1940s when I was a kid. It was used mostly in the game of "hide and go se ek" similarly to the way in which the dictionary says it was used for "tag". The term "gools sticker" (pronounced "goolsticka") was also used. I have always wondered about its etymology. One of my theories is that it was a corrupt ion of the word "goal" that somehow took on an "s" at the end, perhaps as stated in the dictionary. Another possibility is a much older root from the archaic heraldic word "gules", which means "red" and is derived from the Latin gul a, meaning "throat". Anyhow, if a kid who was hiding touched the gools before the seeker saw him or her and got back to the gools first, then he/she would cry out "my gools 1-2- 3".

Meaning of lip service

lip service means: To tell people what they want to hear to get them off your back, for the moment. To not be truthful. Commonly used by teenagers as a means of stopping their parents nagging them. Also used by politicans.

Meaning of quite

quite means: n kind of; sort of: What did you think of Jean’s new boyfriend? / Hmm, yeah, I suppose he was quite nice. This is something of a tough one because Brits will also use quite, in the same way as Americans, to mean “very.” The only real way to determine exactly which type of quite is being used is to look at how expressive the word that follows it is. If it’s a word like “perfect” or “delicious” then it’s being used the positive way; if it’s a word like “nice” or “pleasant” then it’s negative.

Meaning of twee

twee means: adj kitsch. Old ladies’ front rooms, tartan cloth jackets and pleasant little sleepy retirement towns are twee. Marilyn Manson, drive-by-shootings and herpes are not.

Meaning of QUAINT

QUAINT means: Quaint is British slang for homosexual.

Meaning of bundle

bundle means: Shouted just before 'bundling' someone, generally a younger boy, A bundle is when a group of boys leap on and force to the ground another boy, usually younger. Generally involves at least three people, often leading to more and more people joining, leaping on until a large pile of boys is formed. It is, of course, very painful (hopefully) for whoever is it at the bottom of the bundle. Generally carries on until everone scarpers when the dinner lady or a teacher came around the corner.

Meaning of jib (2)

jib (2) means: (1) Describe something that someone does not want to say e.g. a coarse word such as sex or fingering someone. (2) As a word to replace any other word really. An example sentence: did you see that man jibbing along., There are many different forms of the word jibs, including, jibbed, jibbing, jib and jibbified and all of these words are in extensive use in many secondary schools in SE England. Jamie and Adam thought of this word and are proud of how it has been used.

Meaning of gormless

gormless means: Derogatory term for an individual of lesser intelligence. Often used in conjunction with the word 'pillock' as in 'Gormless Pillock'. Pillock being another word for a doofus. In Geordieland (North East of England) people say "That blowkie has ner gorm!". (ed: someone mailed in the definition for gorm - but I lost it!)

Meaning of mad

mad means: adj crazy. Brits do not use the term “mad” to refer to people who are pissed off. Describing something as mad (a party, or a weekend away or something) generally means it was riotous fun.

Meaning of omnibus

omnibus means: n 1 old-fashioned bus. This is a quaint word, dating back to the times when buses were open at the rear and had a conductor ready to meet you. An omnibus is essentially one step technologically forward of a tram. 2 concatenated episodes of a week’s worth of television or radio series (typically soap operas) often screened at the weekends (also called “omnibus edition”). The Latin word “omnibus” means simply “for all,” which could explain both of these etymologies. I’m just saying that because I can’t be bothered checking either of them. I can’t even be bothered checking the Latin - someone just told me it. For all I know it’s Latin for pig-fucker.

Meaning of Quaint

Quaint means: Curious and fanciful; affected; odd; whimsical; antique; archaic; singular; unusual; as, quaint architecture; a quaint expression.

Meaning of Hear

Hear means: To perceive by the ear; to apprehend or take cognizance of by the ear; as, to hear sounds; to hear a voice; to hear one call.

Meaning of People

People means: Persons, generally; an indefinite number of men and women; folks; population, or part of population; as, country people; -- sometimes used as an indefinite subject or verb, like on in French, and man in German; as, people in adversity.

Meaning of Hear

Hear means: To attend, or be present at, as hearer or worshiper; as, to hear a concert; to hear Mass.

Meaning of Anglo-Saxon

Anglo-Saxon means: The Teutonic people (Angles, Saxons, Jutes) of England, or the English people, collectively, before the Norman Conquest.

Meaning of Hear

Hear means: To give audience or attention to; to listen to; to heed; to accept the doctrines or advice of; to obey; to examine; to try in a judicial court; as, to hear a recitation; to hear a class; the case will be heard to-morrow.

Meaning of Conjugate

Conjugate means: A word agreeing in derivation with another word, and therefore generally resembling it in signification.

Meaning of Enclitical

Enclitical means: Affixed; subjoined; -- said of a word or particle which leans back upon the preceding word so as to become a part of it, and to lose its own independent accent, generally varying also the accent of the preceding word.

Meaning of Perceive

Perceive means: To obtain knowledge of through the senses; to receive impressions from by means of the bodily organs; to take cognizance of the existence, character, or identity of, by means of the senses; to see, hear, or feel; as, to perceive a distant ship; to perceive a discord.

Meaning of Earwitness

Earwitness means: A witness by means of his ears; one who is within hearing and does hear; a hearer.

Meaning of Folks

Folks means: People in general, or a separate class of people; -- generally used in the plural form, and often with a qualifying adjective; as, the old folks; poor folks.

Meaning of Assume

Assume means: To take for granted, or without proof; to suppose as a fact; to suppose or take arbitrarily or tentatively.

Meaning of Presume

Presume means: To take or suppose to be true, or entitled to belief, without examination or proof, or on the strength of probability; to take for granted; to infer; to suppose.

Meaning of English

English means: Collectively, the people of England; English people or persons.

Meaning of Whig

Whig means: One of a political party which grew up in England in the seventeenth century, in the reigns of Charles I. and II., when great contests existed respecting the royal prerogatives and the rights of the people. Those who supported the king in his high claims were called Tories, and the advocates of popular rights, of parliamentary power over the crown, and of toleration to Dissenters, were, after 1679, called Whigs. The terms Liberal and Radical have now generally superseded Whig in English politics. See the note under Tory.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Aforehand

Aforehand means: Prepared; previously provided; -- opposed to behindhand.

Meaning of Conundrum

Conundrum means: A question to which only a conjectural answer can be made.

Meaning of Mantelet

Mantelet means: A short cloak or mantle worn by women.

Meaning of Pyromania

Pyromania means: An insane disposition to incendiarism.

Meaning of Starling

Starling means: Any passerine bird belonging to Sturnus and allied genera. The European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) is dark brown or greenish black, with a metallic gloss, and spotted with yellowish white. It is a sociable bird, and builds about houses, old towers, etc. Called also stare, and starred. The pied starling of India is Sternopastor contra.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of get into someone's pants

get into someone's pants means: Vrb phrs. To achieve sexual intimacies. E.g."Don't trust him, he's only being nice to get into your pants."

Meaning of Mary palm and her five sisters

Mary palm and her five sisters means: Noun. The hand when employed as a tool for masturbation. Cf. 'madam palm and her five sisters' and 'rosie palm and her five sisters'.

Meaning of MOP TIP

MOP TIP means: SPECIAL PEN WITH REPLACEABLE CHISEL POINT AND OTHER STYLE TIPS, ALSO REFILLABLE

Meaning of chump-change

chump-change means: A small amount of money. The poor chump can't get a date for the big dance.

Meaning of heinz

heinz means: A dog of mixed breed. What a heel! He left is wife and kids for the circus.

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