Slang meaning of CHANNEL PORT

CHANNEL PORT means: Channel port is London Cockney rhyming slang for a 'short', a measure of spirits.

What is the slang meaning/definition of CHANNEL PORT ?

CHANNEL PORT means: Channel port is London Cockney rhyming slang for a 'short', a measure of spirits.

Slang definition of CHANNEL PORT

CHANNEL PORT means: Channel port is London Cockney rhyming slang for a 'short', a measure of spirits.

More meanings / definitions of Channel port is London Cockney rhyming slang for a 'short', a measure of spirits. or words, sentences containing Channel port is London Cockney rhyming slang for a 'short', a measure of spirits.?

Cockney (n.): A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Measure (a.): The manner of ordering and combining the quantities, or long and short syllables; meter; rhythm; hence, a foot; as, a poem in iambic measure.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Short (superl.): Deficient; defective; imperfect; not coming up, as to a measure or standard; as, an account which is short of the trith.

Package (n.): A duty formerly charged in the port of London on goods imported or exported by aliens, or by denizens who were the sons of aliens.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Chaldron (n.): An English dry measure, being, at London, 36 bushels heaped up, or its equivalent weight, and more than twice as much at Newcastle. Now used exclusively for coal and coke.

Channel (v. t.): To form a channel in; to cut or wear a channel or channels in; to groove.

Short (superl.): Engaging or engaged to deliver what is not possessed; as, short contracts; to be short of stock. See The shorts, under Short, n., and To sell short, under Short, adv.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Gully (n.): A channel or hollow worn in the earth by a current of water; a short deep portion of a torrent's bed when dry.

Measure (n.): Extent or degree not excessive or beyong bounds; moderation; due restraint; esp. in the phrases, in measure; with measure; without or beyond measure.

Flat-cap (n.): A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

Wale (n.): Certain sets or strakes of the outside planking of a vessel; as, the main wales, or the strakes of planking under the port sills of the gun deck; channel wales, or those along the spar deck, etc.

Coast (n.): To sail from port to port in the same country.

Short (superl.): Not long; having brief length or linear extension; as, a short distance; a short piece of timber; a short flight.

Port-royalist (n.): One of the dwellers in the Cistercian convent of Port Royal des Champs, near Paris, when it was the home of the Jansenists in the 17th century, among them being Arnauld, Pascal, and other famous scholars. Cf. Jansenist.

Short (adv.): In a short manner; briefly; limitedly; abruptly; quickly; as, to stop short in one's course; to turn short.

Channel (n.): A strait, or narrow sea, between two portions of lands; as, the British Channel.

Port (v. t.): To throw, as a musket, diagonally across the body, with the lock in front, the right hand grasping the small of the stock, and the barrel sloping upward and crossing the point of the left shoulder; as, to port arms.

Bath (n.): A Hebrew measure containing the tenth of a homer, or five gallons and three pints, as a measure for liquids; and two pecks and five quarts, as a dry measure.

Port (n.): The manner in which a person bears himself; deportment; carriage; bearing; demeanor; hence, manner or style of living; as, a proud port.

Port (v. t.): To turn or put to the left or larboard side of a ship; -- said of the helm, and used chiefly in the imperative, as a command; as, port your helm.

Port (n.): The larboard or left side of a ship (looking from the stern toward the bow); as, a vessel heels to port. See Note under Larboard. Also used adjectively.

Dispirit (v. t.): To deprive of cheerful spirits; to depress the spirits of; to dishearten; to discourage.

Metronome (n.): An instrument consisting of a short pendulum with a sliding weight. It is set in motion by clockwork, and serves to measure time in music.

Low (superl.): Wanting strength or animation; depressed; dejected; as, low spirits; low in spirits.

Rhyming (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Rhyme

Short-lived (a.): Not living or lasting long; being of short continuance; as, a short-lived race of beings; short-lived pleasure; short-lived passion.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Channel port is London Cockney rhyming slang for a 'short', a measure of spirits.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Channel port is London Cockney rhyming slang for a 'short', a measure of spirits.

Meaning of CHANNEL PORT

CHANNEL PORT means: Channel port is London Cockney rhyming slang for a 'short', a measure of spirits.

Meaning of CHANNEL PORTS

CHANNEL PORTS means: Channel ports is London Cockney rhyming slang for short trousers (shorts).

Meaning of LONG AND SHORT

LONG AND SHORT means: Long and short is London Cockney rhyming slang for the drink port.

Meaning of CHANNEL FLEET

CHANNEL FLEET means: Channel fleet was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a street.

Meaning of ENGLISH CHANNEL

ENGLISH CHANNEL means: English Channel is London Cockney rhyming slang for panel.

Meaning of PORT AND BRANDY

PORT AND BRANDY means: Port and brandy is London Cockney rhyming slang for sexually aroused (randy).

Meaning of IN AND OUT

IN AND OUT means: In and out is British slang for sexual intercourse.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for snout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for spout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for sprout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for stout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for tout.

Meaning of Cockney rhyming slang

Cockney rhyming slang means: There are lots of words that make up cockney rhyming slang. These are basically rhyming words like "butchers hook" which means "look". If you are in London and you hear someone talk about a Septic they are probably talking about you - because it's short for "Septic tank" which equals "yank", which is our word for an American. How do you like that!

Meaning of Cockney rhyming slang

Cockney rhyming slang means: There are lots of words that make up cockney rhyming slang. These are basically rhyming words like "butchers hook" which means "look". If you are in London and you hear someone talk about a Septic they are probably talking about you - because it's short for "Septic tank" which equals "yank", which is our word for an American. How do you like that!

Meaning of BUBBLE AND SQUEAK

BUBBLE AND SQUEAK means: Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for beak (a magistrate). Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Greek.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for speak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for weak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a week.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for to urinate (leak).

Meaning of SHORT

SHORT means: Short is British slang for a measure of a spirit or liquer. Short was old British slang for a measure of gin.

Meaning of DIDN'T OUGHT

DIDN'T OUGHT means: Didn't ought is London Cockney rhyming slang for the drink port.

Meaning of JACK AND JILL

JACK AND JILL means: Jack and Jill is British slang for a male and female police officer working as a partnership. Jack andJill is London Cockney rhyming slang for hill.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for bill.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for till.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for pill.

Meaning of HARRY TATE

HARRY TATE means: Harry Tate is bingo slang for eight.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for late.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for plate.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for a state of agitation or nervousness (state). HarryTate is London Cockney rhyming slang for weight.Harry Tate is British merchant navy slang for mate.

Meaning of PIMPLE AND WART

PIMPLE AND WART means: Pimple and wart is London Cockney rhyming slang for port.Pimple and wart was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a quart.

Meaning of DUKE OF YORK

DUKE OF YORK means: Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for chalk. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for cork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for fork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for pork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for talk. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for walk.

Meaning of DAILY MAIL

DAILY MAIL means: Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for tale. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for ale. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for bail. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for nail.Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for the backside, buttocks (tail). Daily Mail is British slang for the sex.

Meaning of SHORT DOG

SHORT DOG means: Short dog is American slang for a bottle of cheap wine or spirits.

Meaning of Four Fingers

Four Fingers means: The unofficial measure of one gill of spirits.

Meaning of TEAPOT LID

TEAPOT LID means: Tewapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for a child (kid).Teapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for one pound sterling (quid).Teapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Jew (Yid).

Meaning of Cockney

Cockney means: A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Measure

Measure means: The manner of ordering and combining the quantities, or long and short syllables; meter; rhythm; hence, a foot; as, a poem in iambic measure.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Short

Short means: Deficient; defective; imperfect; not coming up, as to a measure or standard; as, an account which is short of the trith.

Meaning of Package

Package means: A duty formerly charged in the port of London on goods imported or exported by aliens, or by denizens who were the sons of aliens.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Meaning of Chaldron

Chaldron means: An English dry measure, being, at London, 36 bushels heaped up, or its equivalent weight, and more than twice as much at Newcastle. Now used exclusively for coal and coke.

Meaning of Channel

Channel means: To form a channel in; to cut or wear a channel or channels in; to groove.

Meaning of Short

Short means: Engaging or engaged to deliver what is not possessed; as, short contracts; to be short of stock. See The shorts, under Short, n., and To sell short, under Short, adv.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Meaning of Gully

Gully means: A channel or hollow worn in the earth by a current of water; a short deep portion of a torrent's bed when dry.

Meaning of Measure

Measure means: Extent or degree not excessive or beyong bounds; moderation; due restraint; esp. in the phrases, in measure; with measure; without or beyond measure.

Meaning of Flat-cap

Flat-cap means: A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

Meaning of Wale

Wale means: Certain sets or strakes of the outside planking of a vessel; as, the main wales, or the strakes of planking under the port sills of the gun deck; channel wales, or those along the spar deck, etc.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Brocatel

Brocatel means: A marble, clouded and veined with white, gray, yellow, and red, in which the yellow usually prevails. It is also called Siena marble, from its locality.

Meaning of Ephors

Ephors means: of Ephor

Meaning of Homily

Homily means: A discourse or sermon read or pronounced to an audience; a serious discourse.

Meaning of Perfidiously

Perfidiously means: In a perfidious manner.

Meaning of Something

Something means: A part; a portion, more or less; an indefinite quantity or degree; a little.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of SPILL THE GROCERIES

SPILL THE GROCERIES means: Spill the groceries is American slang for to vomit

Meaning of tightass

tightass means: Someone who is very particular, meticulous in following rules. That prof is such a tightass he won't let us out a day early.

Meaning of lesbophobia

lesbophobia means: Irrational fear or hatred lesbians.

Meaning of GULLY

GULLY means: Ghetto tuff, gutter, raw, gangsta "keep it gully"

Meaning of Skrill, 

Skrill,  means: Also:  skrilla, (skrill, SKRIL-a) n., money, cash.  “I can’t go out unless I get some skrill.”  [Etym., Berkeley High]

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