Slang meaning of DAISY ROOTS

DAISY ROOTS means: Daisy roots is London Cockney rhyming slang for boots.

What is the slang meaning/definition of DAISY ROOTS ?

DAISY ROOTS means: Daisy roots is London Cockney rhyming slang for boots.

Slang definition of DAISY ROOTS

DAISY ROOTS means: Daisy roots is London Cockney rhyming slang for boots.

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More meanings / definitions of Daisy roots is London Cockney rhyming slang for boots. or words, sentences containing Daisy roots is London Cockney rhyming slang for boots.?

Cockney (n.): A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Top-boots (n. pl.): High boots, having generally a band of some kind of light-colored leather around the upper part of the leg; riding boots.

Daisy (n.): The whiteweed (Chrysanthemum Leucanthemum), the plant commonly called daisy in North America; -- called also oxeye daisy. See Whiteweed.

Marguerite (n.): The daisy (Bellis perennis). The name is often applied also to the ox-eye daisy and to the China aster.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Moonflower (n.): The oxeye daisy; -- called also moon daisy.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Daisy (n.): A genus of low herbs (Bellis), belonging to the family Compositae. The common English and classical daisy is B. prennis, which has a yellow disk and white or pinkish rays.

Boots (n.): A servant at a hotel or elsewhere, who cleans and blacks the boots and shoes.

Gowan (n.): The daisy, or mountain daisy.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Booted (a.): Wearing boots, especially boots with long tops, as for riding; as, a booted squire.

Flat-cap (n.): A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

Uproot (v. t.): To root up; to tear up by the roots, or as if by the roots; to remove utterly; to eradicate; to extirpate.

Rhyming (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Rhyme

Triplet (n.): Three verses rhyming together.

Cokenay (n.): A cockney.

Cockneys (pl. ): of Cockney

Cockney (a.): Of or relating to, or like, cockneys.

Quatrain (n.): A stanza of four lines rhyming alternately.

Rooter (n.): One who, or that which, roots; one that tears up by the roots.

Rhymery (n.): The art or habit of making rhymes; rhyming; -- in contempt.

Cockney (n.): An effeminate person; a spoilt child.

Cockneyism (n.): The characteristics, manners, or dialect, of a cockney.

Cockneyfy (v. t.): To form with the manners or character of a cockney.

Chime (n.): To make a rude correspondence of sounds; to jingle, as in rhyming.

Bowbell (n.): One born within hearing distance of Bow-bells; a cockney.

Disroot (v. t.): To tear up the roots of, or by the roots; hence, to tear from a foundation; to uproot.

Stub (v. t.): To grub up by the roots; to extirpate; as, to stub up edible roots.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Daisy roots is London Cockney rhyming slang for boots.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Daisy roots is London Cockney rhyming slang for boots.

Meaning of DAISY ROOTS

DAISY ROOTS means: Daisy roots is London Cockney rhyming slang for boots.

Meaning of daisies

daisies means: Noun. Boots. Rhyming slang on daisy roots.

Meaning of Daisy Roots

Daisy Roots means: Boots

Meaning of Daisy Roots

Daisy Roots means: Boots. You can't go out in the rain without your daisies.

Meaning of DAISY BEAT

DAISY BEAT means: Daisy beat is London Cockney rhyming slang for to cheat, swindle.

Meaning of GERT AND DAISY

GERT AND DAISY means: Gert and Daisy is London Cockney rhyming slang for lazy.

Meaning of BUTTERCUP AND DAISY

BUTTERCUP AND DAISY means: Buttercup and Daisy is London Cockney rhyming slang for crazy.

Meaning of IN AND OUT

IN AND OUT means: In and out is British slang for sexual intercourse.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for snout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for spout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for sprout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for stout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for tout.

Meaning of BUBBLE AND SQUEAK

BUBBLE AND SQUEAK means: Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for beak (a magistrate). Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Greek.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for speak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for weak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a week.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for to urinate (leak).

Meaning of JACK AND JILL

JACK AND JILL means: Jack and Jill is British slang for a male and female police officer working as a partnership. Jack andJill is London Cockney rhyming slang for hill.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for bill.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for till.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for pill.

Meaning of DAISY

DAISY means: Daisy is slang for an excellent person or thing.Daisy is slang for a male homosexual or effeminate man.

Meaning of HARRY TATE

HARRY TATE means: Harry Tate is bingo slang for eight.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for late.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for plate.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for a state of agitation or nervousness (state). HarryTate is London Cockney rhyming slang for weight.Harry Tate is British merchant navy slang for mate.

Meaning of DUKE OF YORK

DUKE OF YORK means: Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for chalk. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for cork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for fork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for pork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for talk. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for walk.

Meaning of DAILY MAIL

DAILY MAIL means: Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for tale. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for ale. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for bail. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for nail.Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for the backside, buttocks (tail). Daily Mail is British slang for the sex.

Meaning of PICCOLOS AND FLUTES

PICCOLOS AND FLUTES means: Piccolos and flutes is rare London Cockney rhyming slang for boots.

Meaning of GERMAN FLUTES

GERMAN FLUTES means: German flutes is London Cockney rhyming slang for boots.

Meaning of BURDETT−COUTTS

BURDETT−COUTTS means: Burdett−Coutts was old London Cockney rhyming slang for boots.

Meaning of TEAPOT LID

TEAPOT LID means: Tewapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for a child (kid).Teapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for one pound sterling (quid).Teapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Jew (Yid).

Meaning of BREAD AND BUTTER

BREAD AND BUTTER means: Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for gutter. Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for nutter. Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for putter. Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for shutter. Bread and butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for stutter.

Meaning of SAUSAGE ROLL

SAUSAGE ROLL means: Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for unemployment (dole). Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for a pole.Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Polish person (Pole). Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for poll.Sausage roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for the head (poll).

Meaning of Cockney

Cockney means: A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Top-boots

Top-boots means: High boots, having generally a band of some kind of light-colored leather around the upper part of the leg; riding boots.

Meaning of Daisy

Daisy means: The whiteweed (Chrysanthemum Leucanthemum), the plant commonly called daisy in North America; -- called also oxeye daisy. See Whiteweed.

Meaning of Marguerite

Marguerite means: The daisy (Bellis perennis). The name is often applied also to the ox-eye daisy and to the China aster.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Moonflower

Moonflower means: The oxeye daisy; -- called also moon daisy.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Meaning of Daisy

Daisy means: A genus of low herbs (Bellis), belonging to the family Compositae. The common English and classical daisy is B. prennis, which has a yellow disk and white or pinkish rays.

Meaning of Boots

Boots means: A servant at a hotel or elsewhere, who cleans and blacks the boots and shoes.

Meaning of Gowan

Gowan means: The daisy, or mountain daisy.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Meaning of Booted

Booted means: Wearing boots, especially boots with long tops, as for riding; as, a booted squire.

Meaning of Flat-cap

Flat-cap means: A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

Meaning of Uproot

Uproot means: To root up; to tear up by the roots, or as if by the roots; to remove utterly; to eradicate; to extirpate.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Assize

Assize means: A statute or ordinance in general. Specifically: (1) A statute regulating the weight, measure, and proportions of ingredients and the price of articles sold in the market; as, the assize of bread and other provisions; (2) A statute fixing the standard of weights and measures.

Meaning of Hulking

Hulking means: Alt. of Hulky

Meaning of Questmonger

Questmonger means: One who lays informations, and encourages petty lawsuits.

Meaning of Shadow

Shadow means: An uninvited guest coming with one who is invited.

Meaning of Untruth

Untruth means: That which is untrue; a false assertion; a falsehood; a lie; also, an act of treachery or disloyalty.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of STRANGLE A DARKIE

STRANGLE A DARKIE means: Strangle a darkie is Australian slang for to defecate.

Meaning of Innit (though)

Innit (though) means: "agreed", or when asked it means "isn't that so?", if said with though it is asking for everyone's approval. Usually comes at end of sentence.

Meaning of skanger

skanger means: The Irish equivalent of a ned/townie/kev etc. Alternatively known as a "scumbag".

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