Slang meaning of bagsie

bagsie means: v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.]

What is the slang meaning/definition of bagsie ?

bagsie means: v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.]

Slang definition of bagsie

bagsie means: v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.]

More meanings / definitions of v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.] or words, sentences containing v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.]?

Claim (n.): A right to claim or demand something; a title to any debt, privilege, or other thing in possession of another; also, a title to anything which another should give or concede to, or confer on, the claimant.

Claim (n.): The thing claimed or demanded; that (as land) to which any one intends to establish a right; as a settler's claim; a miner's claim.

Quitclaim (n.): A release or relinquishment of a claim; a deed of release; an instrument by which some right, title, interest, or claim, which one person has, or is supposed to have, in or to an estate held by himself or another, is released or relinquished, the grantor generally covenanting only against persons who claim under himself.

Waiver (n.): The act of waiving, or not insisting on, some right, claim, or privilege.

Abandonment (n.): The relinquishment of a right, claim, or privilege, as to mill site, etc.

Nonclaim (n.): A failure to make claim within the time limited by law; omission of claim.

Pretend (v. i.): To put in, or make, a claim, truly or falsely; to allege a title; to lay claim to, or strive after, something; -- usually with to.

Waive (v. t.): To relinquish; to give up claim to; not to insist on or claim; to refuse; to forego.

Prescribe (v. i.): To claim by prescription; to claim a title to a thing on the ground of immemorial use and enjoyment, that is, by a custom having the force of law.

Disclaim (v. t.): To relinquish or deny having a claim; to disavow another's claim; to decline accepting, as an estate, interest, or office.

Pretence (n.): The act of laying claim; the claim laid; assumption; pretension.

Claim (v. i.): To be entitled to anything; to deduce a right or title; to have a claim.

Pretend (v. t.): To lay a claim to; to allege a title to; to claim.

Satisfy (a.): To answer or discharge, as a claim, debt, legal demand, or the like; to give compensation for; to pay off; to requite; as, to satisfy a claim or an execution.

Assert (v. t.): To maintain or defend, as a cause or a claim, by words or measures; to vindicate a claim or title to; as, to assert our rights and liberties.

Quitclaim (v. t.): To release or relinquish a claim to; to release a claim to by deed, without covenants of warranty against adverse and paramount titles.

Right (a.): That which justly belongs to one; that which one has a claim to possess or own; the interest or share which anyone has in a piece of property; title; claim; interest; ownership.

Abandon (v. t.): To relinquish all claim to; -- used when an insured person gives up to underwriters all claim to the property covered by a policy, which may remain after loss or damage by a peril insured against.

Vindicate (v. t.): To lay claim to; to assert a right to; to claim.

Lien (n.): A legal claim; a charge upon real or personal property for the satisfaction of some debt or duty; a right in one to control or hold and retain the property of another until some claim of the former is paid or satisfied.

Dispauper (v. t.): To deprive of the claim of a pauper to public support; to deprive of the privilege of suing in forma pauperis.

Plead (v. t.): To argue in support of a claim, or in defense against the claim of another; to urge reasons for or against a thing; to attempt to persuade one by argument or supplication; to speak by way of persuasion; as, to plead for the life of a criminal; to plead with a judge or with a father.

Counterclaim (n.): A claim made by a person as an offset to a claim made on him.

Coach (n.): A large, closed, four-wheeled carriage, having doors in the sides, and generally a front and back seat inside, each for two persons, and an elevated outside seat in front for the driver.

Topical (n.): Of or pertaining to a place; limited; logical application; as, a topical remedy; a topical claim or privilege.

Barouche (n.): A four-wheeled carriage, with a falling top, a seat on the outside for the driver, and two double seats on the inside arranged so that the sitters on the front seat face those on the back seat.

Martingal (n.): The act of doubling, at each stake, that which has been lost on the preceding stake; also, the sum so risked; -- metaphorically derived from the bifurcation of the martingale of a harness.

Demand (v. t.): To ask or call for with authority; to claim or seek from, as by authority or right; to claim, as something due; to call for urgently or peremptorily; as, to demand a debt; to demand obedience.

Authority (n.): The power derived from opinion, respect, or esteem; influence of character, office, or station, or mental or moral superiority, and the like; claim to be believed or obeyed; as, an historian of no authority; a magistrate of great authority.

Hear (v. t.): To perceive by the ear; to apprehend or take cognizance of by the ear; as, to hear sounds; to hear a voice; to hear one call.

Like to add another meaning or definition of v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.]?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.]

Meaning of bagsie

bagsie means: v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.]

Meaning of bags, bagsey

bags, bagsey means: To lay claim to a thing. Used as "That's my seat I bagsed it just now!", "I bagsey that horse!", "Bags I that cake!". Becky send in the following addition: When we used to 'bagsy' something and claim it as our own you could also say 'turn around, touch the ground bagsy ...' and perform the actions to go with it which would override anyone who just said plain old 'bagsy' and so guaranteed that you won the 'bags'. Interesting suggestion from 'The Ayatollah' who says: Bags and bagsey actually come from public schol slang from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The opposite was "fains" as in "fains I cabbage", although this use never became common. (ed: anyone got any information to back this up?)

Meaning of bags

bags means: Verb. To claim as one's own due to being the first to make such a claim. E.g."Bags I go first." {Informal}Noun. Trousers. {Informal}

Meaning of Shotgun

Shotgun means: Laying claim to the front seat

Meaning of Dibs

Dibs means: A claim – as in “got dibs” on that seat

Meaning of CLAIM

CLAIM means: Claim is British slang for to grab hold of someone. Claim is British slang for to arrest.

Meaning of shotgun

shotgun means: To claim ownership of, to 'bagsy' or 'bags' an object, e.g. "I shotguned that cake".

Meaning of dibs

dibs means: Shouting this word is laying claim to something; the last cookie, the best seat, the right to go first in a game.

Meaning of shotty

shotty means: a phrase yelled when someone wants the good seat. Short form of “shotgun.” Formerly calling “shotgun” got you the front passenger seat in the car (derived from the position on the stagecoach- the person with the shotgun sat up front near the driver). “Shotty” does the same thing. Works with other locations such as “shotty the couch”; “shotty the bean bag chair”; etc. 

Meaning of dibs

dibs means: Noun. A claim. E.g."I put dibs on tasting it first."Verb. To put a personal claim on something. E.g."I made the cocktail so I dibs first taste."

Meaning of STAKE

STAKE means: Pole used in dangerous and now rare method of switching. A cut of cars was shoved by a stake attached to the car immediately in front of the engine. This method was supposed to be superior to the ordinary method of "batting them out" because there was less wear and tear on drawbars and less damage to freight; but the human casualties that resulted gave more than one yard the nickname "slaughterhouse." Another meaning of stake is the money a boomer saved on a job so he could resign and continue eating regularly while looking for another job

Meaning of Shotgun,

Shotgun, means:   Also:  shotti. (SHOT-gun, SHOT-ee), n., The front right passenger seat.  “I called shotgun so I could pick the radio stations.”  [Etym., Old west, stagecoach movies]

Meaning of dibs

dibs means: A claim. I have dibs on the shotgun seat.

Meaning of box

box means: 1 n item that fits down the front of a bloke’s underwear and protects the crown jewels. Americans know it as a “cup,” although I suppose in the U.S. such an item is less likely to be protecting the crown jewels and perhaps instead protects “the Bill of Rights” or some such. 2 female genitalia (universal).

Meaning of shotgun

shotgun means: A place of honor in the front seat of a car beside the driver. Hey, give me a shot of that stuff you're drinking.

Meaning of Mud People

Mud People means: Sentiment that only Wasps are born with souls, everyone else God made from mud. Also suggests life without meaning, value or worth. Used by the church that was attended by Mr. Smith - the hate killer that shot up a bunch of Jews and Blacks in the summer of '99.

Meaning of dockers

dockers means: To claim rights to consumption of 'left over' food or drink when the original owner has had sufficient. Used as "dockers on your bifta?", "dockers on your fag?", "dockers on your ale", etc. Should be used in question form but the first few words, i.e. "Can I have.... ", is usually left off. The claim is usually finished with the word laird (which means lad). Hence user shouting "No dockers, no nothing, no greedy scavs" just before opening a packet of crisps, or whatever, to prevent people stealing them.

Meaning of bludgeon

bludgeon means: (1) to beat, normally until death, to death with a heavy object (original meaning) (2) claim dole, or otherwise feed off society but contribute nothing,

Meaning of dibs/dibbs

dibs/dibbs means: money. Dib was also US slang meaning $1 (one dollar), which presumably extended to more than one when pluralised. Origins of dib/dibs/dibbs are uncertain but probably relate to the old (early 1800s) children's game of dibs or dibstones played with the knuckle-bones of sheep or pebbles. Also relates to (but not necessairly derived from) the expression especially used by children, 'dibs' meaning a share or claim of something, and dibbing or dipping among a group of children, to determine shares or winnings or who would be 'it' for a subsequent chasing game. In this sort of dipping or dibbing, a dipping rhyme would be spoken, coinciding with the pointing or touchung of players in turn, eliminating the child on the final word, for example:

Meaning of Toodle pip

Toodle pip means: This is an old expression meaning goodbye. However, I only hear it when Americans are doing impressions of Brits as it has fallen into disuse, along with steam trains and gas lights.

Meaning of Claim

Claim means: A right to claim or demand something; a title to any debt, privilege, or other thing in possession of another; also, a title to anything which another should give or concede to, or confer on, the claimant.

Meaning of Claim

Claim means: The thing claimed or demanded; that (as land) to which any one intends to establish a right; as a settler's claim; a miner's claim.

Meaning of Quitclaim

Quitclaim means: A release or relinquishment of a claim; a deed of release; an instrument by which some right, title, interest, or claim, which one person has, or is supposed to have, in or to an estate held by himself or another, is released or relinquished, the grantor generally covenanting only against persons who claim under himself.

Meaning of Waiver

Waiver means: The act of waiving, or not insisting on, some right, claim, or privilege.

Meaning of Abandonment

Abandonment means: The relinquishment of a right, claim, or privilege, as to mill site, etc.

Meaning of Nonclaim

Nonclaim means: A failure to make claim within the time limited by law; omission of claim.

Meaning of Pretend

Pretend means: To put in, or make, a claim, truly or falsely; to allege a title; to lay claim to, or strive after, something; -- usually with to.

Meaning of Waive

Waive means: To relinquish; to give up claim to; not to insist on or claim; to refuse; to forego.

Meaning of Prescribe

Prescribe means: To claim by prescription; to claim a title to a thing on the ground of immemorial use and enjoyment, that is, by a custom having the force of law.

Meaning of Disclaim

Disclaim means: To relinquish or deny having a claim; to disavow another's claim; to decline accepting, as an estate, interest, or office.

Meaning of Pretence

Pretence means: The act of laying claim; the claim laid; assumption; pretension.

Meaning of Claim

Claim means: To be entitled to anything; to deduce a right or title; to have a claim.

Meaning of Pretend

Pretend means: To lay a claim to; to allege a title to; to claim.

Meaning of Satisfy

Satisfy means: To answer or discharge, as a claim, debt, legal demand, or the like; to give compensation for; to pay off; to requite; as, to satisfy a claim or an execution.

Meaning of Assert

Assert means: To maintain or defend, as a cause or a claim, by words or measures; to vindicate a claim or title to; as, to assert our rights and liberties.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Bois durci

Bois durci means: A hard, highly polishable composition, made of fine sawdust from hard wood (as rosewood) mixed with blood, and pressed.

Meaning of Eumolpus

Eumolpus means: A genus of small beetles, one species of which (E. viti) is very injurious to the vines in the wine countries of Europe.

Meaning of Tail

Tail means: To hold by the end; -- said of a timber when it rests upon a wall or other support; -- with in or into.

Meaning of Titling

Titling means: The meadow pipit.

Meaning of Wolf

Wolf means: Any one of several species of wild and savage carnivores belonging to the genus Canis and closely allied to the common dog. The best-known and most destructive species are the European wolf (Canis lupus), the American gray, or timber, wolf (C. occidentalis), and the prairie wolf, or coyote. Wolves often hunt in packs, and may thus attack large animals and even man.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of Y

Y means: Y is American slang for the YMCA.Y is American slang for the male homosexual community.

Meaning of lip

lip means: Noun. Verbal impudence, cheek.

Meaning of TWSS

TWSS means: That's What She Said

Meaning of Tagger

Tagger means: They often leave the tags on clothing.

Tags: Slang Meaning of v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.]. The slang definition of v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.]. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.]? Please, add a definition of v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.] if you did not find one from a search of v stake a claim for something in the same way that Americans would claim “dibbs” on or “call” some item or privilege: I bagsie the front seat or Bagsie first shot on the dodgems! It’s a rather childlike sentiment; you would be less likely to hear I bagsie being Financial Director! It doesn’t seem ridiculously far-fetched that it’d be derived from “bags I,” with “bag” meaning to catch something. But hey, who can tell. [Etymologists. –ed.].

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