Slang meaning of codswallop

codswallop means: n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse.

What is the slang meaning/definition of codswallop ?

codswallop means: n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse.

Slang definition of codswallop

codswallop means: n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse.

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More meanings / definitions of n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse. or words, sentences containing n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse.?

Swipe (n.): Poor, weak beer; small beer.

Bottling (n.): The act or the process of putting anything into bottles (as beer, mineral water, etc.) and corking the bottles.

Yeast-bitten (a.): A term used of beer when the froth of the yeast has reentered the body of the beer.

Entire (n.): A name originally given to a kind of beer combining qualities of different kinds of beer.

Bock beer (): A strong beer, originally made in Bavaria.

Shandygaff (n.): A mixture of strong beer and ginger beer.

Beery (a.): Of or resembling beer; affected by beer; maudlin.

Lager beer (): Originally a German beer, but now also made in immense quantities in the United States; -- so called from its being laid up or stored for some months before use.

Blink beer (): Beer kept unbroached until it is sharp.

Purl (n.): Malt liquor, medicated or spiced; formerly, ale or beer in which wormwood or other bitter herbs had been infused, and which was regarded as tonic; at present, hot beer mixed with gin, sugar, and spices.

Saccharomyces (n.): A genus of budding fungi, the various species of which have the power, to a greater or less extent, or splitting up sugar into alcohol and carbonic acid. They are the active agents in producing fermentation of wine, beer, etc. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the yeast of sedimentary beer. Also called Torula.

Bottler (n.): One who bottles wine, beer, soda water, etc.

Kilderkin (n.): A small barrel; an old liquid measure containing eighteen English beer gallons, or nearly twenty-two gallons, United States measure.

Bombard (n.): A large drinking vessel or can, or a leather bottle, for carrying liquor or beer.

Double (n.): Double beer; strong beer.

Rotgut (n.): Bad small beer.

Pony (n.): A small glass of beer.

Stound (n.): A vessel for holding small beer.

Taplash (n.): Bad small beer; also, the refuse or dregs of liquor.

Grout (n.): Formerly, a kind of beer or ale.

Beeregar (n.): Sour beer.

Cue (n.): A small portion of bread or beer; the quantity bought with a farthing or half farthing.

Quas (n.): A kind of beer. Same as Quass.

Schenkbeer (n.): A mild German beer.

Stingo (n.): Old beer; sharp or strong liquor.

Swizzle (n.): Ale and beer mixed; also, drink generally.

Bombardman (n.): One who carried liquor or beer in a can or bombard.

Fox (v. i.): To turn sour; -- said of beer, etc., when it sours in fermenting.

Flower (v. i.): To froth; to ferment gently, as new beer.

Fox (n.): To make sour, as beer, by causing it to ferment.

Like to add another meaning or definition of n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse.

Meaning of codswallop

codswallop means: n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse.

Meaning of bitter

bitter means: n proper beer, made with hops and served at room temperature (not actually warmed, contrary to popular opinion). The European/American fizzy lager shite is not real beer.

Meaning of Stubby

Stubby means: A short neck beer bottle. All Canadian beer bottles used to be this way. Now only specialty, small brewer beers use these bottles. "If it is in a stubby, it's got to be Canadian".

Meaning of pop

pop means: Carbonated flavoured water based drinks sold in cans or bottles. Basically a can of fizzy drink - e.g. coke. Was also used as a euphamism for beer then used as "I was out on the pop last night!". (ed: I wonder if anyone else remembers the old Corona lorries that used to travel the streets delivering the weeks supplies?).

Meaning of DUTCH BEER

DUTCH BEER means: Dutch beer is British slang for dull, insipid, flat beer.

Meaning of BOTTLE OF BEER

BOTTLE OF BEER means: Bottle of beer is London Cockney rhyming slang for ear.

Meaning of shop-beer

shop-beer means: beer bought either at the liquor or beer store (not homemade)

Meaning of Neck stamper

Neck stamper means: The boy who collects the pots belonging to an alehouse, sent out with beer to private houses (Now, this is interesting – first of all, that alehouses sent beer out to public houses at all, and secondly, that it was common enough to that there was a term for the boy sent to collect the pots. Apparently, there was takeaway beer in 1811! – K)

Meaning of beer goggles

beer goggles means: Noun. The impaired judgement from the excessive consumption of alcohol (beer) that makes an otherwise unappealing person or thing seem attractive. E.g."I was obviously wearing beer goggles last night; when I awoke and saw who I'd brought home the previous night I nearly threw up, she had 3 eyes, a green beard and tentacles coming out of the top of her head." [1990s]

Meaning of Malty coves

Malty coves means: Beer drinkers (this is my new term for all beer tour and sampler participants – K)

Meaning of beer goggles

beer goggles means: The device that attaches to your face after the consumption of alcohol that turns even the most ugly girl into an absolute stunner. Normally referred to the morning after as in "Christ! Did you see that munter I pulled last night, my beer goggles must have been well and truly strapped on". Can be modified by referring to the degree of tightness with which the beer goggles are strapped to the face as in 'My beer goggles were on so tight they were cutting into my face!"

Meaning of bitch tits

bitch tits means: Noun. 1. Overly developed fatty deposits on the male breasts, the medical condition of gynecomastia. Term can be heard on the bodybuilding scene, the condition being one of the consequences of steroid abuse. 2. As the above, having fatty breast tissue, but due to excessive drinking of beer. Cf. 'beer tits'

Meaning of Small-beer

Small-beer means: “He doesn’t think small beer of himself,” he has a high opinion of himself

Meaning of Growlers

Growlers means: Buckets, cans, or pitchers carried by apprentices or children to the saloon to be filled with beer and returned to the workplace during the day. They were called "growlers" because of the grating noise when slid across the bar. Fetching the beer from the saloon in a growler was called rushing the growler, working the growler, or chasing the can.

Meaning of BEER EATER

BEER EATER means: Beer eater is British slang for someone who loves beer.

Meaning of BEER ME UP SCOTTY

BEER ME UP SCOTTY means: Beer me up Scotty is British slang for a request for a beer.

Meaning of Stubby

Stubby means: A small bottle of beer

Meaning of pint

pint means: n the standard U.K. measure of beer - equivalent to 0.568 litres in new money or twenty ounces in American money. It is normally possible to buy a half-pint instead of a pint, but doing so will mar you for life in the eyes of your peers. Drinking half-pints of beer is generally seen as the liquid equivalent of painting your fingernails and mincing. At some point in history (no idea when) a British king (not sure which one) elected to raise tax on beer but upon discovering that he needed an act of parliament to change the tax, he instead changed the size of the pint (which only required a royal edict). The smaller sixteen-ounce American pint, therefore actually represents the original size of the British pint. As you can see I’ve not researched this at all. I just wrote down what someone told me. There are many times in my life when I’m forced to make a simple choice between the real truth and a funny story.

Meaning of BELCHER

BELCHER means: Belcher is slang for a spotted handkerchief.Belcher was th century English slang for a thick finger ring.Belcher is slang for a dedicated beer drinker.Belcher is American slang for a complainer, a winger.Belcher is American slang for an informant.

Meaning of beer o'clock

beer o'clock means: Noun. The time one feels is most appropriate for some alcoholic refreshment , such as beer. Often used specifically to mean the end of the working day.

Meaning of Swipe

Swipe means: Poor, weak beer; small beer.

Meaning of Bottling

Bottling means: The act or the process of putting anything into bottles (as beer, mineral water, etc.) and corking the bottles.

Meaning of Yeast-bitten

Yeast-bitten means: A term used of beer when the froth of the yeast has reentered the body of the beer.

Meaning of Entire

Entire means: A name originally given to a kind of beer combining qualities of different kinds of beer.

Meaning of Bock beer

Bock beer means: A strong beer, originally made in Bavaria.

Meaning of Shandygaff

Shandygaff means: A mixture of strong beer and ginger beer.

Meaning of Beery

Beery means: Of or resembling beer; affected by beer; maudlin.

Meaning of Lager beer

Lager beer means: Originally a German beer, but now also made in immense quantities in the United States; -- so called from its being laid up or stored for some months before use.

Meaning of Blink beer

Blink beer means: Beer kept unbroached until it is sharp.

Meaning of Purl

Purl means: Malt liquor, medicated or spiced; formerly, ale or beer in which wormwood or other bitter herbs had been infused, and which was regarded as tonic; at present, hot beer mixed with gin, sugar, and spices.

Meaning of Saccharomyces

Saccharomyces means: A genus of budding fungi, the various species of which have the power, to a greater or less extent, or splitting up sugar into alcohol and carbonic acid. They are the active agents in producing fermentation of wine, beer, etc. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the yeast of sedimentary beer. Also called Torula.

Meaning of Bottler

Bottler means: One who bottles wine, beer, soda water, etc.

Meaning of Kilderkin

Kilderkin means: A small barrel; an old liquid measure containing eighteen English beer gallons, or nearly twenty-two gallons, United States measure.

Meaning of Bombard

Bombard means: A large drinking vessel or can, or a leather bottle, for carrying liquor or beer.

Meaning of Double

Double means: Double beer; strong beer.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Authority

Authority means: Justification; warrant.

Meaning of Bashless

Bashless means: Shameless; unblushing.

Meaning of Della Crusca

Della Crusca means: A shortened form of Accademia della Crusca, an academy in Florence, Italy, founded in the 16th century, especially for conserving the purity of the Italian language.

Meaning of Overstride

Overstride means: To stride over or beyond.

Meaning of Stroam

Stroam means: To take long strides in walking.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of Tom

Tom means: A gay man, especially one who hangs about in public lavatories looking for sexual encounters

Meaning of CAMP RADIO

CAMP RADIO means: John delivers a lively, cutting-edge, sometimes silly soliloquy. He can shift from class to crass in the blink of a lie. Drawing on his experience of living in virtually every "gay-hood" on the Coast, he puts a decidedly lavender and delightfully laughable spin on every aspect of life in the 90’s…from grocery shopping to romance. Phone # 1-888-669-7234 http://trianglebroadcasting.com/campers.htm

Meaning of Skipper

Skipper means:   One who sleeps in hedges and outhouses

Meaning of spook

spook means: To frighten. Word has it, Melvin was a spook for the CIA in his youth.

Tags: Slang Meaning of n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse.. The slang definition of n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse.? Please, add a definition of n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse. if you did not find one from a search of n nonsense. The etymology of this antiquated but superb word leads us to an English gentleman named Hiram Codd, who in 1872 came up with the idea of putting a marble and a small rubber ring just inside the necks of beer bottles in order to keep fizzy beer fizzy (“wallop” being Old English for beer). The idea was that the pressure of the fizz would push the marble against the ring, thereby sealing the bottle. Unfortunately, the thing wasn’t nearly as natty as he’d hoped and “Codd’s wallop” slid into the language first as a disparaging comment about flat beer and eventually as a general term of abuse..

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