Slang meaning of crumbs

crumbs means: interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window.

What is the slang meaning/definition of crumbs ?

crumbs means: interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window.

Slang definition of crumbs

crumbs means: interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window.

More meanings / definitions of interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window. or words, sentences containing interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window.?

Ha (interj.): An exclamation denoting surprise, joy, or grief. Both as uttered and as written, it expresses a great variety of emotions, determined by the tone or the context. When repeated, ha, ha, it is an expression of laughter, satisfaction, or triumph, sometimes of derisive laughter; or sometimes it is equivalent to "Well, it is so."

Crummy (a.): Full of crumb or crumbs.

Scalloped (n.): Baked in a scallop; cooked with crumbs.

Contex (v. t.): To context.

Buzz (n.): A continuous, humming noise, as of bees; a confused murmur, as of general conversation in low tones, or of a general expression of surprise or approbation.

Context (a.): Knit or woven together; close; firm.

Context (v. t.): To knit or bind together; to unite closely.

Bread (v. t.): To cover with bread crumbs, preparatory to cooking; as, breaded cutlets.

Crumb (v. t.): To break into crumbs or small pieces with the fingers; as, to crumb bread.

Concordance (n.): An alphabetical verbal index showing the places in the text of a book where each principal word may be found, with its immediate context in each place.

Context (n.): The part or parts of something written or printed, as of Scripture, which precede or follow a text or quoted sentence, or are so intimately associated with it as to throw light upon its meaning.

Scallop (n.): To bake in scallop shells or dishes; to prepare with crumbs of bread or cracker, and bake. See Scalloped oysters, below.

In (adv.): Not out; within; inside. In, the preposition, becomes an adverb by omission of its object, leaving it as the representative of an adverbial phrase, the context indicating what the omitted object is; as, he takes in the situation (i. e., he comprehends it in his mind); the Republicans were in (i. e., in office); in at one ear and out at the other (i. e., in or into the head); his side was in (i. e., in the turn at the bat); he came in (i. e., into the house).

Expensive (a.): Occasioning expense; calling for liberal outlay; costly; dear; liberal; as, expensive dress; an expensive house or family.

Profane (a.): Irreverent in language; taking the name of God in vain; given to swearing; blasphemous; as, a profane person, word, oath, or tongue.

Bloody (a.): Smeared or stained with blood; as, bloody hands; a bloody handkerchief.

Exclamation (n.): A loud calling or crying out; outcry; loud or emphatic utterance; vehement vociferation; clamor; that which is cried out, as an expression of feeling; sudden expression of sound or words indicative of emotion, as in surprise, pain, grief, joy, anger, etc.

Fall (v. t.): To be dropped or uttered carelessly; as, an unguarded expression fell from his lips; not a murmur fell from him.

Vain (superl.): Destitute of forge or efficacy; effecting no purpose; fruitless; ineffectual; as, vain toil; a vain attempt.

Civillty (n.): Courtesy; politeness; kind attention; good breeding; a polite act or expression.

Eh (interj.): An expression of inquiry or slight surprise.

General (a.): Not restrained or limited to a precise import; not specific; vague; indefinite; lax in signification; as, a loose and general expression.

Will (adv.): As an auxiliary, will is used to denote futurity dependent on the verb. Thus, in first person, "I will" denotes willingness, consent, promise; and when "will" is emphasized, it denotes determination or fixed purpose; as, I will go if you wish; I will go at all hazards. In the second and third persons, the idea of distinct volition, wish, or purpose is evanescent, and simple certainty is appropriately expressed; as, "You will go," or "He will go," describes a future event as a fact only. To emphasize will denotes (according to the tone or context) certain futurity or fixed determination.

Antiquated (a.): Grown old. Hence: Bygone; obsolete; out of use; old-fashioned; as, an antiquated law.

Archaism (a.): An ancient, antiquated, or old-fashioned, word, expression, or idiom; a word or form of speech no longer in common use.

Ghastly (adv.): In a ghastly manner; hideously.

Antiquation (n.): The act of making antiquated, or the state of being antiquated.

Variety (n.): Something varying or differing from others of the same general kind; one of a number of things that are akin; a sort; as, varieties of wood, land, rocks, etc.

Oath (n.): A careless and blasphemous use of the name of the divine Being, or anything divine or sacred, by way of appeal or as a profane exclamation or ejaculation; an expression of profane swearing.

Lackaday (interj.): Alack the day; alas; -- an expression of sorrow, regret, dissatisfaction, or surprise.

Like to add another meaning or definition of interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window.

Meaning of crumbs

crumbs means: interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window.

Meaning of crikey

crikey means: interj general expression of surprise. Rather elderly and a little esoteric these days — you can most imagine it being used in a context something like: Crikey, Eustace — looks like Cambridge are going to win after all! It may be derived from “Christ kill me.” It also may not.

Meaning of Blooming, Bloody

Blooming, Bloody means:   (Blasted, etc.)  are forms of profanity not heard in polite company (Today they've been replaced in prestige with "Fucking",

Meaning of crumbs !

crumbs ! means: Exclam. A mild exclamation of surprise or amazement.

Meaning of Bloody

Bloody means: - One of the most useful swear words in English. Mostly used as an exclamation of surprise i.e. "bloody hell" or "bloody nora". Something may be "bloody marvellous" or "bloody awful". It is also used to emphasise almost anything, "you're bloody mad", "not bloody likely" and can also be used in the middle of other words to emphasise them. E.g. "Abso-bloody-lutely"! Americans should avoid saying "bloody" as they sound silly.

Meaning of Bloody

Bloody means: One of the most useful swear words in English. Mostly used as an exclamation of surprise i.e. "bloody hell" or "bloody nora". Something may be "bloody marvellous" or "bloody awful". It is also used to emphasise almost anything, "you're bloody mad", "not bloody likely" and can also be used in the middle of other words to emphasise them. E.g. "Abso-bloody-lutely"! Americans should avoid saying "bloody" as they sound silly.

Meaning of hella

hella means: adv. used in conjunction with another word as an intensifier. As if to say “very.” Derived from “A hell of a lot of . . .” Examples include: hella-cool, hella-stupid, hella-crazy, or hella-funny.  "I called your name hella times, but you didn't come." “That’s because I had hella fun last night."  2. adj. extremely large quantities  "He had hella cash!" 

Meaning of Bloody

Bloody means: Australia's most prominent and frequently spoken adjective 2. An expression of agreement or praise. e.g. "Bloody good job, I'll make sure you get that raise, you deserve it!" 3. Or conversely an expression of anger, annoyance or even of a stronger application. e.g. "Those bloody kids, stealing my watermelons again, I'll tan their hides if I catch them!"

Meaning of crumbles

crumbles means: crumbs of bread

Meaning of crumbs

crumbs means: Tiny pieces of crack

Meaning of CRUMBS

CRUMBS means: tiny pieces of crack

Meaning of get washed

get washed means: v. Term meaning to get taken over, often used in the context of violence like getting jumped or even in the context of drugs like getting drunk or high.  "Johnny messin’ with them ballers from the East Side and gonna get washed if he ain’t careful."  Lyrical reference: HIEROGLYPHIC'S - All Things (Album: 3rd Eye Vision 1998)  All things, ain't, what they seemYou'll get washed; even if you're way too clean 

Meaning of kibbles & bits

kibbles & bits means: Small crumbs of crack

Meaning of KIBBLES & BITS

KIBBLES & BITS means: small crumbs of crack

Meaning of bum-crumbs

bum-crumbs means: Faecal material that clings to anal hairs.

Meaning of Rissole

Rissole means: Mince meat and bread crumbs rolled into the shape of a ball

Meaning of ILICISCOMK

ILICISCOMK means: I Laughed, I Cried, I Spat/Spilt Coffee/Crumbs/Coke On My Keyboard

Meaning of Blitzed

Blitzed means: Gosh; general expression of surprise, shock

Meaning of Gullyfluff

Gullyfluff means:  The waste — coagulated dust, crumbs, and hair — which accumulates imperceptibly in the pockets of schoolboys.

Meaning of cock-on

cock-on means: A "catch all" phrase that encompasses a range of meanings. Can be used in the same context as "Right on", e.g. "Cock on man, I know what you mean". It can be used in the same context as "Rock on", e.g. "cock on, I'll catch you later". It can be used to describe something or some event that is or was great "Last was cock on", "Those shoes are cock on". This phrase has and still is evolving and mutating into many different meanings. (ed: most of which remain the same as they ever were)

Meaning of Ha

Ha means: An exclamation denoting surprise, joy, or grief. Both as uttered and as written, it expresses a great variety of emotions, determined by the tone or the context. When repeated, ha, ha, it is an expression of laughter, satisfaction, or triumph, sometimes of derisive laughter; or sometimes it is equivalent to "Well, it is so."

Meaning of Crummy

Crummy means: Full of crumb or crumbs.

Meaning of Scalloped

Scalloped means: Baked in a scallop; cooked with crumbs.

Meaning of Contex

Contex means: To context.

Meaning of Buzz

Buzz means: A continuous, humming noise, as of bees; a confused murmur, as of general conversation in low tones, or of a general expression of surprise or approbation.

Meaning of Context

Context means: Knit or woven together; close; firm.

Meaning of Context

Context means: To knit or bind together; to unite closely.

Meaning of Bread

Bread means: To cover with bread crumbs, preparatory to cooking; as, breaded cutlets.

Meaning of Crumb

Crumb means: To break into crumbs or small pieces with the fingers; as, to crumb bread.

Meaning of Concordance

Concordance means: An alphabetical verbal index showing the places in the text of a book where each principal word may be found, with its immediate context in each place.

Meaning of Context

Context means: The part or parts of something written or printed, as of Scripture, which precede or follow a text or quoted sentence, or are so intimately associated with it as to throw light upon its meaning.

Meaning of Scallop

Scallop means: To bake in scallop shells or dishes; to prepare with crumbs of bread or cracker, and bake. See Scalloped oysters, below.

Meaning of In

In means: Not out; within; inside. In, the preposition, becomes an adverb by omission of its object, leaving it as the representative of an adverbial phrase, the context indicating what the omitted object is; as, he takes in the situation (i. e., he comprehends it in his mind); the Republicans were in (i. e., in office); in at one ear and out at the other (i. e., in or into the head); his side was in (i. e., in the turn at the bat); he came in (i. e., into the house).

Meaning of Expensive

Expensive means: Occasioning expense; calling for liberal outlay; costly; dear; liberal; as, expensive dress; an expensive house or family.

Meaning of Profane

Profane means: Irreverent in language; taking the name of God in vain; given to swearing; blasphemous; as, a profane person, word, oath, or tongue.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Alleviate

Alleviate means: To lighten or lessen the force or weight of.

Meaning of Discretive

Discretive means: Marking distinction or separation; disjunctive.

Meaning of Inscribe

Inscribe means: To write or engrave; to mark down as something to be read; to imprint.

Meaning of Pronounce

Pronounce means: To utter articulately; to speak out or distinctly; to utter, as words or syllables; to speak with the proper sound and accent as, adults rarely learn to pronounce a foreign language correctly.

Meaning of Skirrhus

Skirrhus means: See Scirrhus.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of REEFER

REEFER means: Reefer is slang for a hand−rolled cannabis cigarette. Reefer is criminal slang for a pickpocket.

Meaning of Snog

Snog means: - If you are out on the pull you will know you are succeeding if you end up snogging someone of the opposite sex (or same sex for that matter!). It would probably be referred to as making out in American, or serious kissing!

Meaning of dexies

dexies means: dextroamphetamines

Meaning of little winkles

little winkles means: Little winkles in their shells, I think it is a sin, To pick the buggers out And eat them off a pin.

Tags: Slang Meaning of interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window.. The slang definition of interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window.? Please, add a definition of interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window. if you did not find one from a search of interj general expression of surprise. Much akin to “God,” or “bloody hell” in that context (but without the ghastly use of our saviour’s name in vain or any swearing). It’s quite all right to use in polite company, though perhaps a little antiquated. More likely to be heard in a context like: Crumbs, that’s more expensive than Harrods rather than: Crumbs, I just dropped the smack out the window..

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