Slang meaning of hire

hire means: v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine.

What is the slang meaning/definition of hire ?

hire means: v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine.

Slang definition of hire

hire means: v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine.

More meanings / definitions of v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine. or words, sentences containing v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine.?

Hire (n.): To procure (any chattel or estate) from another person, for temporary use, for a compensation or equivalent; to purchase the use or enjoyment of for a limited time; as, to hire a farm for a year; to hire money.

Let (v. t.): To allow to be used or occupied for a compensation; to lease; to rent; to hire out; -- often with out; as, to let a farm; to let a house; to let out horses.

Hiring (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Hire

Hire (n.): The price, reward, or compensation paid, or contracted to be paid, for the temporary use of a thing or a place, for personal service, or for labor; wages; rent; pay.

Rack-rent (n.): A rent of the full annual value of the tenement, or near it; an excessive or unreasonably high rent.

Number (n.): The distinction of objects, as one, or more than one (in some languages, as one, or two, or more than two), expressed (usually) by a difference in the form of a word; thus, the singular number and the plural number are the names of the forms of a word indicating the objects denoted or referred to by the word as one, or as more than one.

Rental (n.): A schedule, account, or list of rents, with the names of the tenants, etc.; a rent roll.

Blackmail (n.): Black rent, or rent paid in corn, flesh, or the lowest coin, a opposed to "white rent", which paid in silver.

Hire (n.): To engage or purchase the service, labor, or interest of (any one) for a specific purpose, by payment of wages; as, to hire a servant, an agent, or an advocate.

Wage (v. t.): To adventure, or lay out, for hire or reward; to hire out.

Know-nothing (n.): A member of a secret political organization in the United States, the chief objects of which were the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws, and the exclusive choice of native Americans for office.

Job (v. t.): To hire or let by the job or for a period of service; as, to job a carriage.

Drawbar (n.): An openmouthed bar at the end of a car, which receives a coupling link and pin by which the car is drawn. It is usually provided with a spring to give elasticity to the connection between the cars of a train.

Rent (n.): Figuratively, a schism; a rupture of harmony; a separation; as, a rent in the church.

Rent (v. i.): To be leased, or let for rent; as, an estate rents for five hundred dollars a year.

Rent (n.): To take and hold under an agreement to pay rent; as, the tennant rents an estate of the owner.

Rent (n.): To grant the possession and enjoyment of, for a rent; to lease; as, the owwner of an estate or house rents it.

Shunter (n.): A person employed to shunt cars from one track to another.

Fee (v. t.): To reward for services performed, or to be performed; to recompense; to hire or keep in hire; hence, to bribe.

Reprise (n.): Deductions and duties paid yearly out of a manor and lands, as rent charge, rent seck, pensions, annuities, and the like.

See (v. t.): To accompany in person; to escort; to wait upon; as, to see one home; to see one aboard the cars.

Spell (n.): The time during which one person or gang works until relieved; hence, any relatively short period of time, whether a few hours, days, or weeks.

Trochee (n.): A foot of two syllables, the first long and the second short, as in the Latin word ante, or the first accented and the second unaccented, as in the English word motion; a choreus.

Suspense (a.): A temporary cessation of one's right; suspension, as when the rent or other profits of land cease by unity of possession of land and rent.

Distrain (v. t.): To seize, as a pledge or indemnification; to take possession of as security for nonpayment of rent, the reparation of an injury done, etc.; to take by distress; as, to distrain goods for rent, or of an amercement.

Location (n.): A contract for the use of a thing, or service of a person, for hire.

And (conj.): A particle which expresses the relation of connection or addition. It is used to conjoin a word with a word, a clause with a clause, or a sentence with a sentence.

Derivative (n.): A word formed from another word, by a prefix or suffix, an internal modification, or some other change; a word which takes its origin from a root.

Rent (n.): A certain periodical profit, whether in money, provisions, chattels, or labor, issuing out of lands and tenements in payment for the use; commonly, a certain pecuniary sum agreed upon between a tenant and his landlord, paid at fixed intervals by the lessee to the lessor, for the use of land or its appendages; as, rent for a farm, a house, a park, etc.

Splinter (n.): A thin piece split or rent off lengthwise, as from wood, bone, or other solid substance; a thin piece; a sliver; as, splinters of a ship's mast rent off by a shot.

Like to add another meaning or definition of v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine.

Meaning of hire

hire means: v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine.

Meaning of fortnight

fortnight means: n two weeks (from “fourteen nights”). This word is in very common usage in the U.K. As to why the Brits need a term for a time period which the Americans have never felt the urge to name, perhaps it stems from the fact that Americans get so little annual leave that they can never really take a fortnight of holiday anyway.

Meaning of pavement

pavement means: n sidewalk. Brits call the part that cars drive on “Tarmac.” I wonder how many holidaymakers have been run over as a result of this confusion. Well, probably none really. I digress. Historically, “sidewalk” is in fact an old, now-unused British English word meaning exactly what the Americans take it to mean.

Meaning of quite

quite means: n kind of; sort of: What did you think of Jean’s new boyfriend? / Hmm, yeah, I suppose he was quite nice. This is something of a tough one because Brits will also use quite, in the same way as Americans, to mean “very.” The only real way to determine exactly which type of quite is being used is to look at how expressive the word that follows it is. If it’s a word like “perfect” or “delicious” then it’s being used the positive way; if it’s a word like “nice” or “pleasant” then it’s negative.

Meaning of gear lever

gear lever means: n the “stick” of a stick-shift car. This applies to cars with manual transmission - automatic cars in the U.K. are reserved for pensioners, the severely disabled and Americans.

Meaning of jam

jam means: n jelly. Sort of. What Americans call “jelly” (fruit preserve without fruity-bits in it), Brits still call jam. What Americans call “jello,” Brits call “jelly.” Oh yes, and what Americans call “jam” is still also called jam in the U.K. I think that’s the jams pretty much covered.

Meaning of garden

garden means: n back yard. Americans use the word “garden” to refer to areas where fairly specific things are grown – flowers or vegetables, for example. Brits use the word to refer to the area behind their house which contains some grass, a long-since abandoned attempt at a rockery and a broken plastic tricycle.

Meaning of mum

mum means: n mom. Brits do also use the word in the American sense of “quiet” (as in “keep mum about that”) though maybe not as much in everyday speech as Americans. They’d probably say “schtum” instead.

Meaning of RENT PARTY

RENT PARTY means: Rent party is Black−American slang for a party given in ones home to make money to pay the rent.

Meaning of pissed

pissed means: adj drunk. Brits do not use it alone as a contraction of “pissed off,” which means that Americans saying things like “I was really pissed with my boss at work today” leaves Brits wide-eyed. go out on the - venture out drinking. taking the - poking fun at someone. May well be a throwback to the U.S. use of the word.

Meaning of university

university means: n college. As well as having the “University of St. Andrews” in the same way that Americans would have the “University of Oklahoma,” Brits use university as a general term to describe those sorts of institutions: I’m still at university at the moment. Brits do not use the word “college” in that context.

Meaning of bollard

bollard means: n small concrete or metal post generally used to stop cars from driving into certain places. While used only in a nautical context in the U.S., it is accepted universally in the U.K. When not on boats, Americans call them “pylons,” which to Brits are the giant metal structures used to hold up national grid electricity wires.

Meaning of Ace Boon Coon

Ace Boon Coon means: A euphemistic way of saying my ni**a or my best friend. Note: because of the use of the word 'coon' this is a very explosive word just like the 'N' word. African Americans may use it among themselves, but it is rude (and grounds for a beat down in some circles)for someone of another ethnicity to use it. In other words, it's an 'off-limits' word.  "Johnny and me been down since we was shorties. You know he my Ace Boon Coon." 

Meaning of bomb

bomb means: n splendid success: Our party went off like a bomb. Unlike Americans, Brits do not use this word as an adjective or verb to indicate that something went badly.

Meaning of LOW RENT

LOW RENT means: Low rent is American slang for shabby, sordid, inferior.

Meaning of PAY ME RENT

PAY ME RENT means: Pay me rent is Australian rhyming slang for tent.

Meaning of RENT BOY

RENT BOY means: Rent boy is slang for a male prostitute.

Meaning of joint

joint means: n large side of meat, like a Sunday roast. The Brits, like the Americans, also use the word to refer to cannabis spliffs, which means that these days you’d be unlikely to get away with referring to your “Sunday joint” without someone giggling.

Meaning of football

football means: n soccer. Americans call a different game “football.” It doesn’t require much involvement from feet, and they don’t have a proper ball. Brits call that “American football.” I have a theory about the relative popularities of soccer in the U.K. and American football in the U.S., upon which I shall now expound. In life in general, British people tend to put up with the status quo and keep their fingers crossed, rather than make any conscious effort towards striving for success. Until success lands miraculously upon their doorstep, Brits will pass the time moaning about how difficult their lives are. Americans, on the other hand, like to feel that they’re entirely in control of their own destiny and can shape it in any way they see fit. Americans will go out actively seeking success, and until it arrives they will mercilessly criticise themselves for not trying hard enough to find it. Bear with me, the point is approaching. Soccer is a game with very low scores – it’s not uncommon for a game to end with no scoring at all by either team. American football, on the other hand, has scoring aplenty. The net result of this is that a fairly poor soccer team can win a game just by being a bit lucky. This proves to Brits that success truly is a random thing, and they just need to keep waiting. A bad American football team will never win a game. This proves to Americans that hard work pays off, and that they should continue to better themselves in whatever way they can.

Meaning of Bastard

Bastard means: Not the offensive word known and used by Americans, this colourful word has a variety of meanings in Australia, that expresses both good and bad feelings. The term thus requires a complete understanding of how it is to be used and spoken, prior to conversational use. For example

Meaning of Hire

Hire means: To procure (any chattel or estate) from another person, for temporary use, for a compensation or equivalent; to purchase the use or enjoyment of for a limited time; as, to hire a farm for a year; to hire money.

Meaning of Let

Let means: To allow to be used or occupied for a compensation; to lease; to rent; to hire out; -- often with out; as, to let a farm; to let a house; to let out horses.

Meaning of Hiring

Hiring means: of Hire

Meaning of Hire

Hire means: The price, reward, or compensation paid, or contracted to be paid, for the temporary use of a thing or a place, for personal service, or for labor; wages; rent; pay.

Meaning of Rack-rent

Rack-rent means: A rent of the full annual value of the tenement, or near it; an excessive or unreasonably high rent.

Meaning of Number

Number means: The distinction of objects, as one, or more than one (in some languages, as one, or two, or more than two), expressed (usually) by a difference in the form of a word; thus, the singular number and the plural number are the names of the forms of a word indicating the objects denoted or referred to by the word as one, or as more than one.

Meaning of Rental

Rental means: A schedule, account, or list of rents, with the names of the tenants, etc.; a rent roll.

Meaning of Blackmail

Blackmail means: Black rent, or rent paid in corn, flesh, or the lowest coin, a opposed to "white rent", which paid in silver.

Meaning of Hire

Hire means: To engage or purchase the service, labor, or interest of (any one) for a specific purpose, by payment of wages; as, to hire a servant, an agent, or an advocate.

Meaning of Wage

Wage means: To adventure, or lay out, for hire or reward; to hire out.

Meaning of Know-nothing

Know-nothing means: A member of a secret political organization in the United States, the chief objects of which were the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws, and the exclusive choice of native Americans for office.

Meaning of Job

Job means: To hire or let by the job or for a period of service; as, to job a carriage.

Meaning of Drawbar

Drawbar means: An openmouthed bar at the end of a car, which receives a coupling link and pin by which the car is drawn. It is usually provided with a spring to give elasticity to the connection between the cars of a train.

Meaning of Rent

Rent means: Figuratively, a schism; a rupture of harmony; a separation; as, a rent in the church.

Meaning of Rent

Rent means: To be leased, or let for rent; as, an estate rents for five hundred dollars a year.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Bedsore

Bedsore means: A sore on the back or hips caused by lying for a long time in bed.

Meaning of Enlay

Enlay means: See Inlay.

Meaning of Ribbed

Ribbed means: Intercalated with slate; -- said of a seam of coal.

Meaning of Steeper

Steeper means: A vessel, vat, or cistern, in which things are steeped.

Meaning of Surculation

Surculation means: Act of purning.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of HILLMAN HUNTER

HILLMAN HUNTER means: Hillman Hunter is London Cockney rhyming slang for a customer (punter).

Meaning of handle

handle means: Noun. A name, a nickname, a pseudonym, an alias. {Informal}

Meaning of yarn

yarn means: to talk "haven' a yarn"

Meaning of W^

W^ means: What's up? (also wuzzup?)

Meaning of copying

copying means: running on floating ice-pan to ice-pan

Tags: Slang Meaning of v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine.. The slang definition of v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine.? Please, add a definition of v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine. if you did not find one from a search of v rent. Americans rent rental-cars; Brits hire hire-cars. In the U.K., the word extends to any other objects you might borrow for a short period of time - bicycles, bulldozers, hookers and such like. Americans will only ever use the word “hire” in connection with hiring a person to perform a task, not a machine..

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