Slang meaning of ladder

ladder means: n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S.

What is the slang meaning/definition of ladder ?

ladder means: n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S.

Slang definition of ladder

ladder means: n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S.

More meanings / definitions of n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S. or words, sentences containing n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S.?

Ladder (v. i.): That which resembles a ladder in form or use; hence, that by means of which one attains to eminence.

Batrachia (n. pl.): The order of amphibians which includes the frogs and toads; the Anura. Sometimes the word is used in a wider sense as equivalent to Amphibia.

Preposition (n.): A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Scale (n.): A ladder; a series of steps; a means of ascending.

Pound (n.): A British denomination of money of account, equivalent to twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about $4.86. There is no coin known by this name, but the gold sovereign is of the same value.

Struthiones (n. pl.): In a wider sense, an extensive group of birds including the ostriches, cassowaries, emus, moas, and allied birds incapable of flight. In this sense it is equivalent to Ratitae, or Dromaeognathae.

Turn (n.): A fall off the ladder at the gallows; a hanging; -- so called from the practice of causing the criminal to stand on a ladder which was turned over, so throwing him off, when the signal was given.

Sense (v. t.): A faculty, possessed by animals, of perceiving external objects by means of impressions made upon certain organs (sensory or sense organs) of the body, or of perceiving changes in the condition of the body; as, the senses of sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch. See Muscular sense, under Muscular, and Temperature sense, under Temperature.

Egotism (n.): The practice of too frequently using the word I; hence, a speaking or writing overmuch of one's self; self-exaltation; self-praise; the act or practice of magnifying one's self or parading one's own doings. The word is also used in the sense of egoism.

Trope (n.): The use of a word or expression in a different sense from that which properly belongs to it; the use of a word or expression as changed from the original signification to another, for the sake of giving life or emphasis to an idea; a figure of speech.

Ploughgate (n.): The Scotch equivalent of the English word plowland.

Fiddledeedee (interj.): An exclamatory word or phrase, equivalent to nonsense!

Scale (v. t.): To climb by a ladder, or as if by a ladder; to ascend by steps or by climbing; to clamber up; as, to scale the wall of a fort.

With (prep.): To denote the accomplishment of cause, means, instrument, etc; -- sometimes equivalent to by.

Equivalent (n.): Something equivalent; that which is equal in value, worth, weight, or force; as, to offer an equivalent for damage done.

Requite (v. t.): To repay; in a good sense, to recompense; to return (an equivalent) in good; to reward; in a bad sense, to retaliate; to return (evil) for evil; to punish.

Cabala (n.): A kind of occult theosophy or traditional interpretation of the Scriptures among Jewish rabbis and certain mediaeval Christians, which treats of the nature of god and the mystery of human existence. It assumes that every letter, word, number, and accent of Scripture contains a hidden sense; and it teaches the methods of interpretation for ascertaining these occult meanings. The cabalists pretend even to foretell events by this means.

Fixture (n.): Anything of an accessory character annexed to houses and lands, so as to constitute a part of them. This term is, however, quite frequently used in the peculiar sense of personal chattels annexed to lands and tenements, but removable by the person annexing them, or his personal representatives. In this latter sense, the same things may be fixtures under some circumstances, and not fixtures under others.

What (pron., a., & adv.): Sometimes prefixed to adjectives in an adverbial sense, as nearly equivalent to how; as, what happy boys!

Anagram (n.): Literally, the letters of a word read backwards, but in its usual wider sense, the change or one word or phrase into another by the transposition of its letters. Thus Galenus becomes angelus; William Noy (attorney-general to Charles I., and a laborious man) may be turned into I moyl in law.

Avaunt (interj.): Begone; depart; -- a word of contempt or abhorrence, equivalent to the phrase "Get thee gone."

Scalariform (a.): Resembling a ladder in form or appearance; having transverse bars or markings like the rounds of a ladder; as, the scalariform cells and scalariform pits in some plants.

Straiten (v. t.): To restrict; to distress or embarrass in respect of means or conditions of life; -- used chiefly in the past participle; -- as, a man straitened in his circumstances.

Impossible (a.): Not possible; incapable of being done, of existing, etc.; unattainable in the nature of things, or by means at command; insuperably difficult under the circumstances; absurd or impracticable; not feasible.

Well (a.): Good in condition or circumstances; desirable, either in a natural or moral sense; fortunate; convenient; advantageous; happy; as, it is well for the country that the crops did not fail; it is well that the mistake was discovered.

Narrow (superl.): Limited as to means; straitened; pinching; as, narrow circumstances.

Thicken (v. t.): To make thick (in any sense of the word).

Soon (adv.): Readily; willingly; -- in this sense used with would, or some other word expressing will.

Wanion (n.): A word of uncertain signification, used only in the phrase with a wanion, apparently equivalent to with a vengeance, with a plague, or with misfortune.

Tropologize (v. t.): To use in a tropological sense, as a word; to make a trope of.

Like to add another meaning or definition of n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S.

Meaning of ladder

ladder means: n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S.

Meaning of tights

tights means: n pantyhose. I’m getting rather out of my depth here. Opaque, very thin women’s leggings and generally skin-coloured or black. “Tights” in the U.S. are generally coloured, thicker, more like leggings and rarely worn. All of this makes little difference to me because the only reason I’d ever think about buying either would be if I was considering a career in armed robbery.

Meaning of Fit

Fit means: - Fit is a word that I have heard a lot recently - it seems to be making a comeback. A fit bird means a girl who is pretty good looking or tasty! A fit bloke would be the male equivalent.

Meaning of Fit

Fit means: Fit is a word that I have heard a lot recently - it seems to be making a comeback. A fit bird means a girl who is pretty good looking or tasty! A fit bloke would be the male equivalent.

Meaning of Jacobs Ladder

Jacobs Ladder means: A rope ladder with wooden steps. A rope ladder, lowered from the deck, as when pilots or passengers come aboard.

Meaning of Ladder

Ladder means:  “Can’t see a hole in a ladder,” said of anyone who is intoxicated. It was once said that a man was never properly drunk until he could not lie down without holding, could not see a hole through a ladder, or went to the pump to light his pipe.

Meaning of LOUSE LADDER

LOUSE LADDER means: Louse ladder was th century British slang for a dropped stitch in a stocking.

Meaning of straight

straight means: When used alone it is usually taken to mean that person is either a) heterosexual - as in "Bob hit on Karl last night even though Karl is straight!" b) honest - "Yeah, I trust him He's straight!". When used with another word it is used to emphasise the other word e.g. "Hey yous' straight trippin' man"; which means "You are crazy"... but might also be interpreted as "You're making a dreadful mistake." (ed: I love slang - makes no sense at all most of the time )

Meaning of naaied

naaied means: Being "messed around" For example "He naaied her last night.", "He got naaied by the headmaster.". To naai means to fuck in a sexual sense (from the afrikaans for fuck (sexual sense), naai). To get naaied means to be "fucked around" in a non sexual sense. f. Afrikaans and original Dutch.

Meaning of Jacob's Ladder

Jacob's Ladder means: A rope ladder, sometimes with wooden steps built in for ease of use.

Meaning of Lieutenant

Lieutenant means: The Lieutenant is naval equivalent to Captain in the Army and Air Force; the rank insignia is two standard stripes. The word is from the French language, lieu, "place"; and tenner, "to hold", and means "one who acts for, or in lieu of, a superior officer."

Meaning of Jacob's Ladder

Jacob's Ladder means: Rope ladder that was used to climb aboard ships

Meaning of Savvy

Savvy means: When asked as one word question or interjection it means "Do you understand. The term has been made famous by the Pirates of the Caribbean movies. It dates from around 1785, originally pronounced/spelled "scavey". It is believed to have come from the French word scavoir (savoir) which means to be knowledgeable.

Meaning of queue

queue means: n, v, pron. “cue” line. This doesn’t really help the definition at all, as a line could be any number of things. A pencil line? A railway line? A line of Charlie? A line dancer? As a result of this potentially dangerous confusion, a word was developed by some British word-scientists to separate this particular line from all the others. A queue is a line of people. To queue is to be one of those queuing in the queue. The word means “tail” in French, and is used in the same context. Americans do in fact use the word, but only in the “you’re third in the queue” type telephone call waiting systems.

Meaning of Keep a Pig

Keep a Pig means:  An Oxford University phrase, which means to have a lodger. A man whose rooms contain two bedchambers has sometimes, when his college is full, to allow the use of one of them to a freshman, who is called under these circumstances a pig. The original occupier is then said to “keep a pig.”

Meaning of Sod

Sod means: - This word has many uses. My father always used to say "Oh Sod!" or "Sod it!" if something went wrong and he didn't want to swear too badly in front of the children. If someone is a sod or an "old sod" then it means they are a bit of a bastard or an old git. "Sod off" is like saying "piss off" or "get lost" & "sod you" means something like "f*** off". It also means a chunk of lawn of course. You can usually tell the difference!

Meaning of Sod

Sod means: This word has many uses. My father always used to say "Oh Sod!" or "Sod it!" if something went wrong and he didn't want to swear too badly in front of the children. If someone is a sod or an "old sod" then it means they are a bit of a bastard or an old git. "Sod off" is like saying "piss off" or "get lost" & "sod you" means something like "f*** off". It also means a chunk of lawn of course. You can usually tell the difference!

Meaning of Accommodation Ladder

Accommodation Ladder means: A ladder against the side of the ship to provide access when in harbour but not alongside the jetty or if the ship is at anchor.

Meaning of TAN'

TAN' means: to stand; usually used in the sense of "to be". "A so im tan", "that is what he is like"; "tan deh!" or "yu tan deh!" means "just you wait!". "Tan tedy", stand steady, means "hold still".

Meaning of Spoons

Spoons means: Equivalent of money, means or fortune.

Meaning of Ladder

Ladder means: That which resembles a ladder in form or use; hence, that by means of which one attains to eminence.

Meaning of Batrachia

Batrachia means: The order of amphibians which includes the frogs and toads; the Anura. Sometimes the word is used in a wider sense as equivalent to Amphibia.

Meaning of Preposition

Preposition means: A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Meaning of Scale

Scale means: A ladder; a series of steps; a means of ascending.

Meaning of Pound

Pound means: A British denomination of money of account, equivalent to twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about $4.86. There is no coin known by this name, but the gold sovereign is of the same value.

Meaning of Struthiones

Struthiones means: In a wider sense, an extensive group of birds including the ostriches, cassowaries, emus, moas, and allied birds incapable of flight. In this sense it is equivalent to Ratitae, or Dromaeognathae.

Meaning of Turn

Turn means: A fall off the ladder at the gallows; a hanging; -- so called from the practice of causing the criminal to stand on a ladder which was turned over, so throwing him off, when the signal was given.

Meaning of Sense

Sense means: A faculty, possessed by animals, of perceiving external objects by means of impressions made upon certain organs (sensory or sense organs) of the body, or of perceiving changes in the condition of the body; as, the senses of sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch. See Muscular sense, under Muscular, and Temperature sense, under Temperature.

Meaning of Egotism

Egotism means: The practice of too frequently using the word I; hence, a speaking or writing overmuch of one's self; self-exaltation; self-praise; the act or practice of magnifying one's self or parading one's own doings. The word is also used in the sense of egoism.

Meaning of Trope

Trope means: The use of a word or expression in a different sense from that which properly belongs to it; the use of a word or expression as changed from the original signification to another, for the sake of giving life or emphasis to an idea; a figure of speech.

Meaning of Ploughgate

Ploughgate means: The Scotch equivalent of the English word plowland.

Meaning of Fiddledeedee

Fiddledeedee means: An exclamatory word or phrase, equivalent to nonsense!

Meaning of Scale

Scale means: To climb by a ladder, or as if by a ladder; to ascend by steps or by climbing; to clamber up; as, to scale the wall of a fort.

Meaning of With

With means: To denote the accomplishment of cause, means, instrument, etc; -- sometimes equivalent to by.

Meaning of Equivalent

Equivalent means: Something equivalent; that which is equal in value, worth, weight, or force; as, to offer an equivalent for damage done.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Almacantar

Almacantar means: A recently invented instrument for observing the heavenly bodies as they cross a given almacantar circle. See Almucantar.

Meaning of Depurition

Depurition means: See Depuration.

Meaning of Halachoth

Halachoth means: of Halacha

Meaning of Premorse

Premorse means: Terminated abruptly, or as it bitten off.

Meaning of Sentimentally

Sentimentally means: In a sentimental manner.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of DILLIGAF

DILLIGAF means: Do I Look Like I Give A F**k do i look like i care

Meaning of FAP

FAP means: F***ing A Pissed

Meaning of menage de trois

menage de trois means: Term 'borrowed' from the original French now used to describe a situation in which three people are intimately involved. In use it usually refers to a situation where one woman shares herself between two men. This of course leads us naturally to Woddy Allens comment on being asked his opinion on sex between a man and a woman, that it was a wonderful thing, provided you get between the right man and the right woman!

Meaning of cherry

cherry means: Something excellent, outstanding. That new rod of James's is pure cherry.

Tags: Slang Meaning of n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S.. The slang definition of n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S.? Please, add a definition of n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S. if you did not find one from a search of n run. In the sense of a “ladder in your tights” being the British equivalent of a “run in your pantyhose.” In all other circumstances, this word means exactly the same in the U.K. as it does in the U.S..

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