Slang meaning of pikey

pikey means: n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends.

What is the slang meaning/definition of pikey ?

pikey means: n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends.

Slang definition of pikey

pikey means: n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends.

More meanings / definitions of n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends. or words, sentences containing n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends.?

Englishry (n.): A body of English or people of English descent; -- commonly applied to English people in Ireland.

Trash (v. t.): To free from trash, or worthless matter; hence, to lop; to crop, as to trash the rattoons of sugar cane.

Inch (a.): Measurement an inch in any dimension, whether length, breadth, or thickness; -- used in composition; as, a two-inch cable; a four-inch plank.

English (n.): Collectively, the people of England; English people or persons.

Magna Charta (): The great Charter, so called, obtained by the English barons from King John, A. D. 1215. This name is also given to the charter granted to the people of England in the ninth year of Henry III., and confirmed by Edward I.

Track (n.): A mark left by something that has passed along; as, the track, or wake, of a ship; the track of a meteor; the track of a sled or a wheel.

To (prep.): In many phrases, and in connection with many other words, to has a pregnant meaning, or is used elliptically.

Y- (): A prefix of obscure meaning, originally used with verbs, adverbs, adjectives, nouns, and pronouns. In the Middle English period, it was little employed except with verbs, being chiefly used with past participles, though occasionally with the infinitive Ycleped, or yclept, is perhaps the only word not entirely obsolete which shows this use.

Anglo- (): A combining form meaning the same as English; or English and, or English conjoined with; as, Anglo-Turkish treaty, Anglo-German, Anglo-Irish.

Lighting (n.): A name sometimes applied to the process of annealing metals.

People (n.): One's ancestors or family; kindred; relations; as, my people were English.

Yearling (n.): An animal one year old, or in the second year of its age; -- applied chiefly to cattle, sheep, and horses.

Preposition (n.): A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Ascians (n. pl.): Persons who, at certain times of the year, have no shadow at noon; -- applied to the inhabitants of the torrid zone, who have, twice a year, a vertical sun.

Anglo-Saxon (n.): The Teutonic people (Angles, Saxons, Jutes) of England, or the English people, collectively, before the Norman Conquest.

Vocable (n.): A word; a term; a name; specifically, a word considered as composed of certain sounds or letters, without regard to its meaning.

Trash (v. t.): To treat as trash, or worthless matter; hence, to spurn, humiliate, or crush.

Frog (n.): A supporting plate having raised ribs that form continuations of the rails, to guide the wheels where one track branches from another or crosses it.

Expound (v. t.): To lay open the meaning of; to explain; to clear of obscurity; to interpret; as, to expound a text of Scripture, a law, a word, a meaning, or a riddle.

Trash (v. t.): To hold back by a trash or leash, as a dog in pursuing game; hence, to retard, encumber, or restrain; to clog; to hinder vexatiously.

Colored (a.): Of some other color than white; specifically applied to negroes or persons having negro blood; as, a colored man; the colored people.

Trochee (n.): A foot of two syllables, the first long and the second short, as in the Latin word ante, or the first accented and the second unaccented, as in the English word motion; a choreus.

Abracadabra (n.): A mystical word or collocation of letters written as in the figure. Worn on an amulet it was supposed to ward off fever. At present the word is used chiefly in jest to denote something without meaning; jargon.

Rail (n.): A bar of steel or iron, forming part of the track on which the wheels roll. It is usually shaped with reference to vertical strength, and is held in place by chairs, splices, etc.

Anglo-Saxon (n.): The language of the English people before the Conquest (sometimes called Old English). See Saxon.

Bovate (n.): An oxgang, or as much land as an ox can plow in a year; an ancient measure of land, of indefinite quantity, but usually estimated at fifteen acres.

Eighteenth (n.): The quotient of a unit divided by eighteen; one of eighteen equal parts or divisions.

Eighteen (n.): The number greater by a unit than seventeen; eighteen units or objects.

Spruce (n.): Neat, without elegance or dignity; -- formerly applied to things with a serious meaning; now chiefly applied to persons.

Junior (n.): Hence: One of a lower or later standing; specifically, in American colleges, one in the third year of his course, one in the fourth or final year being designated a senior; in some seminaries, one in the first year, in others, one in the second year, of a three years' course.

Like to add another meaning or definition of n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends.

Meaning of pikey

pikey means: n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends.

Meaning of WHITE TRASH

WHITE TRASH means: White trash is slang for poor white people living in the southern USA. White trash is slang for decadent rich white people.

Meaning of white trash

white trash means: Poor people that do not attempt to hide their lack of money. They live in filth (e.g. rusting cars and old kitchen appliances fill the front yard,) they are poorly educated, they don't care about their appearance (e.g. they are poorly groomed and overweight, wear dirty and tattered clothes,) et cetera. Though "white trash" can live anywhere, they are indigenous to the midwestern and southern United States; "90% of my school is white trash.".

Meaning of dubs

dubs means: Rims on car. (ed: still no clue what a 'rim' is but we got the following extra info.:) "She put 20 inch DUBS on her 2002 Lincoln Navigator last week. Custom 20 inch rims (or bigger). Really wide rims. The slang word originated from American Hip Hop culture (1999 or later). Common on Lowriders, SUV's, trucks and expensive sports cars. (ed: so still no real clue what a 'rim' is. Is it the same as a hub cap?). But then Iain sent this in: In the entry "dubs" you say it refers to "rims" and you don't know what that is, what it refers to is the actual wheel on the car/truck/bus not the hubcap, so 18inch rims are wheels with a diameter of 18 inches, tyres go on the outside of the rim. So people would refer to having alloy rims (or just alloys) when they had alloy wheels on the car. Which solves that!

Meaning of knickers

knickers means: n women’s underpants. In old-fashioned English and American English, “knickers” (an abbreviation of the Dutch-derived word “knickerbockers”) are knee-length trousers most often seen nowadays on golfers.

Meaning of white trash

white trash means: deragatory term for poor white people without any class

Meaning of white trash

white trash means: deragatory term for poor white people without any class

Meaning of gold label

gold label means: 12% proof beer which is topped up to a pint with R White's Lemonade and consumed by fifteen year olds in the backroom of the local "safe pub".

Meaning of honkie

honkie means: As far as I know, this is the black american derogatory retaliation for white, or caucasian people calling them niggers. The assumption being 'white' people look, and behave like pigs, therefore honk like pigs! However, the submission we received said it means 'dirty people who mainly are from the west virginian area/the country" It's possible the meaning has mutated so if anyone wants to send in their definition we'd appreciate the help!).

Meaning of farthing

farthing means: a quarter of an old penny (¼d) - not slang, a proper word in use (in slightly different form - feorthung) since the end of the first millenium, and in this list mainly to clarify that the origin of the word is not from 'four things', supposedly and commonly believed from the times when coins were split to make pieces of smaller value, but actually (less excitingly) from Old English feortha, meaning fourth, corresponding to Old Frisian fiardeng, meaning a quarter of a mark, and similar Germanic words meaning four and fourth. The modern form of farthing was first recorded in English around 1280 when it altered from ferthing to farthing.

Meaning of gob

gob means: 1 n mouth. Almost always used in the context “shut your gob.” 2 v spit: The pikey fucker just gobbed down my shirt! It’s possible the word is derived from Gaelic, where it means a bird’s beak, or from the English navy, where it was used widely to refer to the toilet.

Meaning of kibosh/kybosh

kibosh/kybosh means: eighteen pence (i.e., one and six, 1/6, one shilling and sixpence), related to and perhaps derived from the mid-1900s meaning of kibosh for an eighteen month prison sentence. Cassells implies an interesting possible combination of the meanings kibosh (18 month sentence), kibosh (meaning ruin or destroy) - both probably derived from Yiddish (Jewish European/Hebrew dialect) words meaning suppress - with the linking of money and hitting something, as in 'a fourpenny one' (from rhyming slang fourpenny bit

Meaning of nought

nought means: n pron. “nawt” the digit zero. It’s an Old English word meaning “nothing” still used in northern regional English. Also occasionally used in the U.S., along with its more common American sibling, “aught.”

Meaning of guppy

guppy means: A generic term, "guppy" was a bit of wild card insult that could mean almost anything derogatory — thick, stupid, unpopular, unlikable, ugly etc. The comeback was that the real meaning of guppy was a pregnant fish so, when insulted thusly I would adopt a sort of intellectual and moral superiority and sneer "I am *not* a pregnant fish" at my tormentors. When I was 12 (and only just out of the habit of using the word guppy as an insult) I bought myself some tropical fish and was most stunned to find that a guppy *was* actually a fish, though not neccessarily a pregnant one.

Meaning of studdy

studdy means: Large ball bearing over 1 inch diameter used in the game of marbles to trash your opponents lesser glass marbles. There were special rules for bringing studdys into play, which have completely escaped my memory now - it was a long time ago. Sometimes contracted to Stud. Only ever came across this word in Nuneaton.

Meaning of pudding

pudding means: n dessert: If you keep spitting at your grandfather like that you’re going to bed without any pudding! Brits do also use the word in the same sense as Americans do (Christmas pudding, rice pudding, etc). The word “dessert” is used in the U.K. but really only in restaurants, never in the home. To complicate things further, the Brits have main meal dishes which are described as pudding - black pudding and white pudding. These are revolting subsistence foods from the dark ages made with offal, ground oatmeal, dried pork and rubbish from the kitchen floor. The difference between the black and white puddings is that the black one contains substantial quantities of blood. This, much like haggis, is one of those foodstuffs that modern life has saved us from but that people insist on dredging up because it’s a part of their “cultural heritage.” Bathing once a year and shitting in a bucket was a part of your cultural heritage too, you know. At least be consistent.

Meaning of mullet

mullet means: (1) Type of haircut: short on top (possibly spiky) and long at the back. (2) Used to describe white trash. It is usually yelled when someone resembeling whit trash passes by...."Mullllllleeeeeet!!!!!".

Meaning of job

job means: guinea, late 1600s, probably ultimately derived from from the earlier meaning of the word job, a lump or piece (from 14th century English gobbe), which developed into the work-related meaning of job, and thereby came to have general meaning of payment for work, including specific meaning of a guinea. 'Half a job' was half a guinea.

Meaning of dub

dub means: 20 inch chrome rims or wheels. 

Meaning of groat

groat means: an old silver four-penny coin from around 1300 and in use in similar form until c.1662, although Brewer states in his late 1800s revised edition of his 1870 dictionary of slang that 'the modern groat was introduced in 1835, and withdrawn in 1887', which is somewhat confusing. Presumably there were different versions and issues of the groat coin, which seems to have been present in the coinage from the 14th to the 19th centuries. Very occasionally older people, students of English or History, etc., refer to loose change of a small amount of coin money as groats. Sadly the word is almost obsolete now, although the groat coin is kept alive in Maundy Money. The word derives from Middle English and Middle Dutch 'groot' meaning 'great' since this coin was a big one, compared to a penny. The similar German and Austrian coin was the 'Groschen', equivalent to 10 'Pfennigs'. The word can actually be traced back to Roman times, when a 'Denarius Grossus' was a 'thick penny' (equivalent).

Meaning of Englishry

Englishry means: A body of English or people of English descent; -- commonly applied to English people in Ireland.

Meaning of Trash

Trash means: To free from trash, or worthless matter; hence, to lop; to crop, as to trash the rattoons of sugar cane.

Meaning of Inch

Inch means: Measurement an inch in any dimension, whether length, breadth, or thickness; -- used in composition; as, a two-inch cable; a four-inch plank.

Meaning of English

English means: Collectively, the people of England; English people or persons.

Meaning of Magna Charta

Magna Charta means: The great Charter, so called, obtained by the English barons from King John, A. D. 1215. This name is also given to the charter granted to the people of England in the ninth year of Henry III., and confirmed by Edward I.

Meaning of Track

Track means: A mark left by something that has passed along; as, the track, or wake, of a ship; the track of a meteor; the track of a sled or a wheel.

Meaning of To

To means: In many phrases, and in connection with many other words, to has a pregnant meaning, or is used elliptically.

Meaning of Y-

Y- means: A prefix of obscure meaning, originally used with verbs, adverbs, adjectives, nouns, and pronouns. In the Middle English period, it was little employed except with verbs, being chiefly used with past participles, though occasionally with the infinitive Ycleped, or yclept, is perhaps the only word not entirely obsolete which shows this use.

Meaning of Anglo-

Anglo- means: A combining form meaning the same as English; or English and, or English conjoined with; as, Anglo-Turkish treaty, Anglo-German, Anglo-Irish.

Meaning of Lighting

Lighting means: A name sometimes applied to the process of annealing metals.

Meaning of People

People means: One's ancestors or family; kindred; relations; as, my people were English.

Meaning of Yearling

Yearling means: An animal one year old, or in the second year of its age; -- applied chiefly to cattle, sheep, and horses.

Meaning of Preposition

Preposition means: A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Meaning of Ascians

Ascians means: Persons who, at certain times of the year, have no shadow at noon; -- applied to the inhabitants of the torrid zone, who have, twice a year, a vertical sun.

Meaning of Anglo-Saxon

Anglo-Saxon means: The Teutonic people (Angles, Saxons, Jutes) of England, or the English people, collectively, before the Norman Conquest.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Ban

Ban means: An ancient title of the warden of the eastern marches of Hungary; now, a title of the viceroy of Croatia and Slavonia.

Meaning of Logistic

Logistic means: Alt. of Logistical

Meaning of Pray

Pray means: See Pry.

Meaning of Qui vive

Qui vive means: The challenge of a French sentinel, or patrol; -- used like the English challenge: "Who comes there?"

Meaning of Randall grass

Randall grass means: The meadow fescue (Festuca elatior). See under Grass.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of HEAVENLY BLISS

HEAVENLY BLISS means: Heavenly bliss is London Cockney rhyming slang for kiss.

Meaning of tilt

tilt means: (telt) a long house in the woods; a tent; a temporary shelter

Tags: Slang Meaning of n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends.. The slang definition of n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends.? Please, add a definition of n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends. if you did not find one from a search of n adj white trash. It’s an old English word meaning “gipsy,” but nowadays pikey is also applied to people in possession of track suits, Citroen Saxos with eighteen-inch wheels and under-car lighting, and pregnant fifteen-year-old girlfriends..

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