Slang meaning of potholing

potholing means: n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans.

What is the slang meaning/definition of potholing ?

potholing means: n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans.

Slang definition of potholing

potholing means: n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans.

More meanings / definitions of n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans. or words, sentences containing n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans.?

Causey (n.): A way or road raised above the natural level of the ground, serving as a dry passage over wet or marshy ground.

Cowboy (n.): One of the marauders who, in the Revolutionary War infested the neutral ground between the American and British lines, and committed depredations on the Americans.

Refer (v. t.): Hence: To send or direct away; to send or direct elsewhere, as for treatment, aid, information, decision, etc.; to make over, or pass over, to another; as, to refer a student to an author; to refer a beggar to an officer; to refer a bill to a committee; a court refers a matter of fact to a commissioner for investigation, or refers a question of law to a superior tribunal.

Plat (n.): A small piece or plot of ground laid out with some design, or for a special use; usually, a portion of flat, even ground.

Dibbler (n.): One who, or that which, dibbles, or makes holes in the ground for seed.

Nineholes (n. pl.): A game in which nine holes are made in the ground, into which a ball is bowled.

Refer (v. i.): To have recourse; to apply; to appeal; to betake one's self; as, to refer to a dictionary.

Dibble (v. i.): A pointed implement used to make holes in the ground in which no set out plants or to plant seeds.

Refer (v. t.): To place in or under by a mental or rational process; to assign to, as a class, a cause, source, a motive, reason, or ground of explanation; as, he referred the phenomena to electrical disturbances.

Envelop (n.): A set of limits for the performance capabilities of some type of machine, originally used to refer to aircraft. Now also used metaphorically to refer to capabilities of any system in general, including human organizations, esp. in the phrase push the envelope. It is used to refer to the maximum performance available at the current state of the technology, and therefore refers to a class of machines in general, not a specific machine.

Leap (n.): The act of leaping, or the space passed by leaping; a jump; a spring; a bound.

Remit (v. t.): To send off or away; hence: (a) To refer or direct (one) for information, guidance, help, etc. "Remitting them . . . to the works of Galen." Sir T. Elyot. (b) To submit, refer, or leave (something) for judgment or decision.

Crossroad (n.): A road that crosses another; an obscure road intersecting or avoiding the main road.

Alignment (n.): The ground-plan of a railway or other road, in distinction from the grades or profile.

Special (a.): Appropriate; designed for a particular purpose, occasion, or person; as, a special act of Parliament or of Congress; a special sermon.

Special (a.): Limited in range; confined to a definite field of action, investigation, or discussion; as, a special dictionary of commercial terms; a special branch of study.

Perforated (a.): Pierced with a hole or holes, or with pores; having transparent dots resembling holes.

Pitch (n.): The distance between the centers of holes, as of rivet holes in boiler plates.

Bushing (n.): The operation of fitting bushes, or linings, into holes or places where wear is to be received, or friction diminished, as pivot holes, etc.

Saltatorious (a.): Capable of leaping; formed for leaping; saltatory; as, a saltatorious insect or leg.

Sport (v. t.): To exhibit, or bring out, in public; to use or wear; as, to sport a new equipage.

Viaduct (n.): A structure of considerable magnitude, usually with arches or supported on trestles, for carrying a road, as a railroad, high above the ground or water; a bridge; especially, one for crossing a valley or a gorge. Cf. Trestlework.

Appropriation (n.): The act of setting apart or assigning to a particular use or person, or of taking to one's self, in exclusion of all others; application to a special use or purpose, as of a piece of ground for a park, or of money to carry out some object.

Caving (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Cave

Golf (n.): A game played with a small ball and a bat or club crooked at the lower end. He who drives the ball into each of a series of small holes in the ground and brings it into the last hole with the fewest strokes is the winner.

Uneven (a.): Not even; not level; not uniform; rough; as, an uneven road or way; uneven ground.

Saltatory (a.): Leaping or dancing; having the power of, or used in, leaping or dancing.

Highway (n.): A road or way open to the use of the public; a main road or thoroughfare.

Jinny road (): An inclined road in a coal mine, on which loaded cars descend by gravity, drawing up empty ones.

Sport (v. i.): To assume suddenly a new and different character from the rest of the plant or from the type of the species; -- said of a bud, shoot, plant, or animal. See Sport, n., 6.

Like to add another meaning or definition of n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans.

Meaning of potholing

potholing means: n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans.

Meaning of garden

garden means: n back yard. Americans use the word “garden” to refer to areas where fairly specific things are grown – flowers or vegetables, for example. Brits use the word to refer to the area behind their house which contains some grass, a long-since abandoned attempt at a rockery and a broken plastic tricycle.

Meaning of jam

jam means: n jelly. Sort of. What Americans call “jelly” (fruit preserve without fruity-bits in it), Brits still call jam. What Americans call “jello,” Brits call “jelly.” Oh yes, and what Americans call “jam” is still also called jam in the U.K. I think that’s the jams pretty much covered.

Meaning of bundle

bundle means: Shouted just before 'bundling' someone, generally a younger boy, A bundle is when a group of boys leap on and force to the ground another boy, usually younger. Generally involves at least three people, often leading to more and more people joining, leaping on until a large pile of boys is formed. It is, of course, very painful (hopefully) for whoever is it at the bottom of the bundle. Generally carries on until everone scarpers when the dinner lady or a teacher came around the corner.

Meaning of joint

joint means: n large side of meat, like a Sunday roast. The Brits, like the Americans, also use the word to refer to cannabis spliffs, which means that these days you’d be unlikely to get away with referring to your “Sunday joint” without someone giggling.

Meaning of For the birds

For the birds means: Imagine how this phrase must sound to someone who doesn’t understand that it refers to something that is substandard in some respect. Is it a bag of seeds or some kind of yard ornament reference? The Brits sometimes use the word ‘bird,’ to refer to women, in the same way Americans use ‘chicks.’ So, maybe it comes off like reference to girlishness. Who knows?

Meaning of Solitaire

Solitaire means: n a game played alone on a sort of four-pointed-star board full of pegs in little holes, where the idea is to remove pegs by jumping other pegs over the top of them, ultimately with the intention of ending up with a single peg left on the board in the middle. Traditionally, the Brits refer to card games one plays alone as “patience” rather than “solitaire” but Microsoft has gone a fair way to changing that.

Meaning of square brackets

square brackets means: n brackets. Something went very wrong at some point in history. Nobody knows what it was, but the end result of it was that, to Brits, [these] are square brackets, and (these) are “brackets”. To Americans, [these] are “brackets” and (these) are “parentheses”. Even {these} ended up being “braces” to Americans but “curly braces” to Brits. It’s possible many people have died as a result of these confusions, although I can’t exactly work out how.

Meaning of tarmac

tarmac means: n blacktop. The stuff that covers roads. Perhaps you’d like to hear some road-making history? Hmm? Or perhaps not. Perhaps you’re sitting in bed naked, waiting for your husband to finish in the shower. Perhaps you’re on a train in a strange foreign country, hoping that this stupid book was going to be much more of a tour guide than it turned out to be. Perhaps you’re having a shit. Well, bucko, whatever you’re doing you’re stuck now, and so you’re going to hear a little bit of road-making history. A long time ago, a Scotsman named John Loudon Macadam invented a way of surfacing roads with gravel, this coating being known as “Macadam” - a term also used in the U.S. “What happens when the road aged?,” I hear you say. Well, I’m so glad you asked. Unfortunately as the road aged the gravel tended to grind to dust and so it was coated with a layer of tar - this being “Tar-Macadam,” which was concatenated to tarmac. Somewhere in the mists of time the Americans ended up using this only to describe airport runways, but the Brits still use it to describe the road surface.

Meaning of bunny hop

bunny hop means: v. to lift both wheels off the ground by crouching down and then exploding upward, pulling the bike with you. Useful for clearing obstructions, such as curbs, potholes, logs. Differs from its older BMX & trials meaning - see jump.

Meaning of fortnight

fortnight means: n two weeks (from “fourteen nights”). This word is in very common usage in the U.K. As to why the Brits need a term for a time period which the Americans have never felt the urge to name, perhaps it stems from the fact that Americans get so little annual leave that they can never really take a fortnight of holiday anyway.

Meaning of football

football means: n soccer. Americans call a different game “football.” It doesn’t require much involvement from feet, and they don’t have a proper ball. Brits call that “American football.” I have a theory about the relative popularities of soccer in the U.K. and American football in the U.S., upon which I shall now expound. In life in general, British people tend to put up with the status quo and keep their fingers crossed, rather than make any conscious effort towards striving for success. Until success lands miraculously upon their doorstep, Brits will pass the time moaning about how difficult their lives are. Americans, on the other hand, like to feel that they’re entirely in control of their own destiny and can shape it in any way they see fit. Americans will go out actively seeking success, and until it arrives they will mercilessly criticise themselves for not trying hard enough to find it. Bear with me, the point is approaching. Soccer is a game with very low scores – it’s not uncommon for a game to end with no scoring at all by either team. American football, on the other hand, has scoring aplenty. The net result of this is that a fairly poor soccer team can win a game just by being a bit lucky. This proves to Brits that success truly is a random thing, and they just need to keep waiting. A bad American football team will never win a game. This proves to Americans that hard work pays off, and that they should continue to better themselves in whatever way they can.

Meaning of pissed

pissed means: adj drunk. Brits do not use it alone as a contraction of “pissed off,” which means that Americans saying things like “I was really pissed with my boss at work today” leaves Brits wide-eyed. go out on the - venture out drinking. taking the - poking fun at someone. May well be a throwback to the U.S. use of the word.

Meaning of university

university means: n college. As well as having the “University of St. Andrews” in the same way that Americans would have the “University of Oklahoma,” Brits use university as a general term to describe those sorts of institutions: I’m still at university at the moment. Brits do not use the word “college” in that context.

Meaning of interval

interval means: n intermission. The break in a stage performance where the audience can go off to have a pee and get some more beers in. At a stretch it could refer to the period of time in which advertisements are shown on television, though Brits more commonly refer to that as the “break.”

Meaning of colleague

colleague means: n co-worker. In here because Brits do not use the term “co-worker.” Of no relevance at all is the fact that Brits also do not refer to the hosts of television news programmes as “anchors,” which caused my British boss some confusion when he became convinced that the CNN presenter had handed over to her “co-wanker.”

Meaning of Sport

Sport means: A disliked individual. Usually if a person is addressed with the word "sport" it denotes uneasiness, dislike or even hostility towards such one. However, if he is your mate, cobber or friend, then he is a "Good Sport"

Meaning of pudding

pudding means: n dessert: If you keep spitting at your grandfather like that you’re going to bed without any pudding! Brits do also use the word in the same sense as Americans do (Christmas pudding, rice pudding, etc). The word “dessert” is used in the U.K. but really only in restaurants, never in the home. To complicate things further, the Brits have main meal dishes which are described as pudding - black pudding and white pudding. These are revolting subsistence foods from the dark ages made with offal, ground oatmeal, dried pork and rubbish from the kitchen floor. The difference between the black and white puddings is that the black one contains substantial quantities of blood. This, much like haggis, is one of those foodstuffs that modern life has saved us from but that people insist on dredging up because it’s a part of their “cultural heritage.” Bathing once a year and shitting in a bucket was a part of your cultural heritage too, you know. At least be consistent.

Meaning of knock up

knock up means: v bang upon someone’s door, generally to get them out of bed: OK, g’night - can you knock me up in the morning? In U.S. English, “knocking someone up” means getting them pregnant. Although most Brits will feign innocence, they do know the U.S. connotations of the phrase and it adds greatly to the enjoyment of using it. Both Brits and Americans share the term “knocking off,” to mean various other things.

Meaning of SA

SA means: Situational Awareness. An allencompassing term for keeping track of what’s happening when flying. SA involves knowing what your airplane is doing relative to its envelope, where your adversary is and what he’s up to, where the ground is, the status of enemy threats on the ground, and hundreds of other variables. Loss of situational awareness is often cited as a contributing factor tomany military-aviation mishaps.

Meaning of Causey

Causey means: A way or road raised above the natural level of the ground, serving as a dry passage over wet or marshy ground.

Meaning of Cowboy

Cowboy means: One of the marauders who, in the Revolutionary War infested the neutral ground between the American and British lines, and committed depredations on the Americans.

Meaning of Refer

Refer means: Hence: To send or direct away; to send or direct elsewhere, as for treatment, aid, information, decision, etc.; to make over, or pass over, to another; as, to refer a student to an author; to refer a beggar to an officer; to refer a bill to a committee; a court refers a matter of fact to a commissioner for investigation, or refers a question of law to a superior tribunal.

Meaning of Plat

Plat means: A small piece or plot of ground laid out with some design, or for a special use; usually, a portion of flat, even ground.

Meaning of Dibbler

Dibbler means: One who, or that which, dibbles, or makes holes in the ground for seed.

Meaning of Nineholes

Nineholes means: A game in which nine holes are made in the ground, into which a ball is bowled.

Meaning of Refer

Refer means: To have recourse; to apply; to appeal; to betake one's self; as, to refer to a dictionary.

Meaning of Dibble

Dibble means: A pointed implement used to make holes in the ground in which no set out plants or to plant seeds.

Meaning of Refer

Refer means: To place in or under by a mental or rational process; to assign to, as a class, a cause, source, a motive, reason, or ground of explanation; as, he referred the phenomena to electrical disturbances.

Meaning of Envelop

Envelop means: A set of limits for the performance capabilities of some type of machine, originally used to refer to aircraft. Now also used metaphorically to refer to capabilities of any system in general, including human organizations, esp. in the phrase push the envelope. It is used to refer to the maximum performance available at the current state of the technology, and therefore refers to a class of machines in general, not a specific machine.

Meaning of Leap

Leap means: The act of leaping, or the space passed by leaping; a jump; a spring; a bound.

Meaning of Remit

Remit means: To send off or away; hence: (a) To refer or direct (one) for information, guidance, help, etc. "Remitting them . . . to the works of Galen." Sir T. Elyot. (b) To submit, refer, or leave (something) for judgment or decision.

Meaning of Crossroad

Crossroad means: A road that crosses another; an obscure road intersecting or avoiding the main road.

Meaning of Alignment

Alignment means: The ground-plan of a railway or other road, in distinction from the grades or profile.

Meaning of Special

Special means: Appropriate; designed for a particular purpose, occasion, or person; as, a special act of Parliament or of Congress; a special sermon.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of fayed

fayed means: of Fay

Meaning of Nonregent

Nonregent means: A master of arts whose regency has ceased. See Regent.

Meaning of Overwork

Overwork means: To fill too full of work; to crowd with labor.

Meaning of Patience

Patience means: Solitaire.

Meaning of Staff

Staff means: A long piece of wood; a stick; the long handle of an instrument or weapon; a pole or srick, used for many purposes; as, a surveyor's staff; the staff of a spear or pike.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of BERNI

BERNI means: Berni is slang for cocaine.

Meaning of GAS

GAS means: Gas is slang for a delightful or successful person or thing. Gas is slang for idle conversation.

Meaning of bint

bint means: Term of derision and insult shouted at at girls/women; "You daft bint" (ed: Roger took us to task for not mentioning that this word has it's origins in Arabic)

Meaning of UNDERGROUND HOG

UNDERGROUND HOG means: Chief engineer

Tags: Slang Meaning of n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans.. The slang definition of n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans.? Please, add a definition of n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans. if you did not find one from a search of n caving; spelunking. The sport that involves leaping down holes in the ground. I’m sure that, in a special way, it’s fun. Brits do still refer to chunks that are missing from the road as potholes, in the same way as Americans..

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