Slang meaning of pukka

pukka means: interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies.

What is the slang meaning/definition of pukka ?

pukka means: interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies.

Slang definition of pukka

pukka means: interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies.

More meanings / definitions of interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies. or words, sentences containing interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies.?

Substantial (a.): Having good substance; strong; stout; solid; firm; as, substantial cloth; a substantial fence or wall.

Illegitimate (a.): Not authorized by good usage; not genuine; spurious; as, an illegitimate word.

Genuine (a.): Belonging to, or proceeding from, the original stock; native; hence, not counterfeit, spurious, false, or adulterated; authentic; real; natural; true; pure; as, a genuine text; a genuine production; genuine materials.

Margin (n.): The difference between the cost and the selling price of an article.

Solid (a.): Fig.: Worthy of credit, trust, or esteem; substantial, as opposed to frivolous or fallacious; weighty; firm; strong; valid; just; genuine.

Quid (n.): A portion suitable to be chewed; a cud; as, a quid of tobacco.

Dubious (a.): Occasioning doubt; not clear, or obvious; equivocal; questionable; doubtful; as, a dubious answer.

Dubious (a.): Of uncertain event or issue; as, in dubious battle.

Vocable (n.): A word; a term; a name; specifically, a word considered as composed of certain sounds or letters, without regard to its meaning.

Monopoly (n.): The exclusive power, or privilege of selling a commodity; the exclusive power, right, or privilege of dealing in some article, or of trading in some market; sole command of the traffic in anything, however obtained; as, the proprietor of a patented article is given a monopoly of its sale for a limited time; chartered trading companies have sometimes had a monopoly of trade with remote regions; a combination of traders may get a monopoly of a particular product.

Th (): In Old English, the article the, when the following word began with a vowel, was often written with elision as if a part of the word. Thus in Chaucer, the forms thabsence, tharray, thegle, thend, thingot, etc., are found for the absence, the array, the eagle, the end, etc.

Preposition (n.): A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Expound (v. t.): To lay open the meaning of; to explain; to clear of obscurity; to interpret; as, to expound a text of Scripture, a law, a word, a meaning, or a riddle.

Primitive (n.): An original or primary word; a word not derived from another; -- opposed to derivative.

Abracadabra (n.): A mystical word or collocation of letters written as in the figure. Worn on an amulet it was supposed to ward off fever. At present the word is used chiefly in jest to denote something without meaning; jargon.

Substantial (a.): Possessed of goods or an estate; moderately wealthy; responsible; as, a substantial freeholder.

Substantial (a.): Belonging to substance; actually existing; real; as, substantial life.

Bafta (n.): A coarse stuff, usually of cotton, originally made in India. Also, an imitation of this fabric made for export.

Intercolonial (a.): Between or among colonies; pertaining to the intercourse or mutual relations of colonies; as, intercolonial trade.

Reckon (v. t.): To conclude, as by an enumeration and balancing of chances; hence, to think; to suppose; -- followed by an objective clause; as, I reckon he won't try that again.

Article (n.): One of the three words, a, an, the, used before nouns to limit or define their application. A (or an) is called the indefinite article, the the definite article.

Creole (n.): One born of European parents in the American colonies of France or Spain or in the States which were once such colonies, esp. a person of French or Spanish descent, who is a native inhabitant of Louisiana, or one of the States adjoining, bordering on the Gulf of of Mexico.

Sowens (n. pl.): A nutritious article of food, much used in Scotland, made from the husk of the oat by a process not unlike that by which common starch is made; -- called flummery in England.

Apron (n.): An article of dress, of cloth, leather, or other stuff, worn on the fore part of the body, to keep the clothes clean, to defend them from injury, or as a covering. It is commonly tied at the waist by strings.

Measure (n.): The quantity determined by measuring, especially in buying and selling; as, to give good or full measure.

Unbrewed (a.): Not made by brewing; unmixed; pure; genuine.

Metonymy (n.): A trope in which one word is put for another that suggests it; as, we say, a man keeps a good table instead of good provisions; we read Virgil, that is, his poems; a man has a warm heart, that is, warm affections.

Univocal (n.): A word having but one meaning.

Ambi- (): A prefix meaning about, around; -- used in words derived from the Latin.

Subderivative (n.): A word derived from a derivative, and not directly from the root; as, "friendliness" is a subderivative, being derived from "friendly", which is in turn a derivative from "friend."

Like to add another meaning or definition of interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies.

Meaning of pukka

pukka means: interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies.

Meaning of pukka

pukka means: Adj. Excellent, wonderful. Derived from the s.e. use of pukka, meaning genuine, and in itself derived from the Hindi pakka, meaning thorough or substantial.

Meaning of pukka, pukka j, pukka j jenkins

pukka, pukka j, pukka j jenkins means: (1) authentic, good e.g. "Have a pukka day.". not slang as such - transposed indian word used incorrectly. (2) Defined as 'something good', e.g. "That goal was pukka J", "Oh yes! Pukka J". The terms 'pukka j' and 'pukka j jenkins' branched off pukka but meant the same thing. Most people just said pukka j!.

Meaning of score

score means: twenty pounds (£20). From the 1900s, simply from the word 'score' meaning twenty, derived apparently from the ancient practice of counting sheep in lots of twenty, and keeping tally by cutting ('scoring') notches into a stick.

Meaning of quid

quid means: one pound (£1) or a number of pounds sterling. Plural uses singular form, eg., 'Fifteen quid is all I want for it..', or 'I won five hundred quid on the horses yesterday..'. The slang money expression 'quid' seems first to have appeared in late 1600s England, derived from Latin (quid meaning 'what', as in 'quid pro quo' - 'something for something else'). Other intriguing possible origins/influences include a suggested connection with the highly secretive Quidhampton banknote paper-mill, and the term quid as applied (ack D Murray) to chewing tobacco, which are explained in more detail under quid in the cliches, words and slang page.

Meaning of PUKKA

PUKKA means: Pukka is British slang for authentic, first−rate, genuine.

Meaning of pukka

pukka means: Adj. A British slang term used to describe something as great, genuine, or first class.  "Those boots you wearing are pukka my man!" 

Meaning of alvida

alvida means: Used when saying goodbye (ed: I had NO idea what it meant when adding it, but it sounded nice. Since then we've had lots of comment!) The first contributor wrote thusly: It would appear that this word for good-bye is a slang for the German 'auf wiedersehen'. Phonetically, it sounds like 'al vee der zane. Hence, 'alvida'.(ed: wasn't right of course, and then we had more comments??) On the other hand, Sameer (and Anil) wrote, "Alvida is a pure Urdu word which means goodbye. As mentioned on your page it may have some similarity with the german word but that would probably because of the fact that German and Hindi have same origin (Sanskrit) and Urdu is derived from Persian, Hindi and one more language. (ed: so there ya go Bumpuppy (who whinged about one of the previous definitions being in here!!) You live and learn! Yet another comment, this time from Pradeep: "Alvida is a commonly used word in India and it literally means goodbye. It is used in literature quite a lot and is becoming less frequently used word in day to day interaction."

Meaning of quid

quid means: n pound (currency). Quid is to “pound” what “buck” is to “dollar.” The word is very widely recognised and socially acceptable but informal - you could quite easily say: “Well, they offered me ten thousand quid for the car” but you wouldn’t hear any BBC announcers reporting: “The government today authorised a ten million quid increase in health service funding.” This perhaps says more about the BBC than this one particular word, but I digress.

Meaning of Quid

Quid means: Pounds sterling. If something costs £1 you may be asked for a quid; the word doesn't change in the plural, so £50 is fifty quid

Meaning of arse

arse means: n 1 what you sit on. Very close in meaning to the American “ass,” although actually derived from a different root, as arse is an old English word meaning “tail.” I can’t be arsed I can’t be bothered. bunch of arse load of nonsense: I never bothered reading the bible, the whole thing is a bunch of arse. 2 interj rats. Used alone in a similar fashion to bollocks: I’m sorry to tell you, sir, but you’ve missed the last train. / Arse!

Meaning of Tippex

Tippex means: n whiteout; Liquid Paper. You know, the stuff that you use to paint over mistakes you’ve made on bits of paper. The stuff that smells good. Fuck, that’s good. Look at the pretty colours. Who wants popcorn?

Meaning of ta

ta means: interj thank you. Often regarded as a little slovenly. May be derived from the Scandinavian “tak,” meaning much the same thing.

Meaning of bice/byce

bice/byce means: two shillings (2/-) or two pounds or twenty pounds - probably from the French bis, meaning twice, which suggests usage is older than the 1900s first recorded and referenced by dictionary sources. Bice could also occur in conjunction with other shilling slang, where the word bice assumes the meaning 'two', as in 'a bice of deaners', pronounced 'bicerdeaners', and with other money slang, for example bice of tenners, pronounced 'bicertenners', meaning twenty pounds.

Meaning of Stuff

Stuff means: A recent headline in the New Statesman read "stuff the millennium". Using stuff in this context is a polite way of saying "f*** the millennium". Who cares! Stuff it! You can also say "stuff him" or "stuff her" meaning they can sod off.

Meaning of Stuff

Stuff means: - A recent headline in the New Statesman read "stuff the millennium". Using stuff in this context is a polite way of saying "f*** the millennium". Who cares! Stuff it! You can also say "stuff him" or "stuff her" meaning they can sod off.

Meaning of toodle-pip

toodle-pip means: interj goodbye; cheerio. Rather old-fashioned. Also toodle-oo. This may be derived from English soldiers attempting to pronounce “a tout à l’heure” (“see you later”) in French during the First World War. Or perhaps toodle-pip is some sort of derivation of that involving the French word “pipe,” which is slang for a blow-job. Whilst this fact is true, the derivation idea is something I’ve just made up off the top of my head right now.

Meaning of bob

bob means: shilling (1/-), although in recent times now means a pound or a dollar in certain regions. Historically bob was slang for a British shilling (Twelve old pence, pre-decimalisation - and twenty shillings to a pound). No plural version; it was 'thirty bob' not 'thirty bobs'. Prior to 1971 bob was one of the most commonly used English slang words. Now sadly gone in the UK for this particular meaning, although lots of other meanings remain (for example the verb or noun meaning of pooh, a haircut, and the verb meaning of cheat). Usage of bob for shilling dates back to the late 1700s. Origin is not known for sure. Possibilities include a connection with the church or bell-ringing since 'bob' meant a set of changes rung on the bells. This would be consistent with one of the possible origins and associations of the root of the word Shilling, (from Proto-Germanic 'skell' meaning to sound or ring). There is possibly an association with plumb-bob, being another symbolic piece of metal, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. Brewer's 1870 Dictionary of Phrase and Fable states that 'bob' could be derived from 'Bawbee', which was 16-19th century slang for a half-penny, in turn derived from: French 'bas billon', meaning debased copper money (coins were commonly cut to make change). Brewer also references the Laird of Sillabawby, a 16th century mintmaster, as a possible origin. Also perhaps a connection with a plumb-bob, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. 'Bob a nob', in the early 1800s meant 'a shilling a head', when estimating costs of meals, etc. In the 18th century 'bobstick' was a shillings-worth of gin. In parts of the US 'bob' was used for the US dollar coin. I am also informed (thanks K Inglott, March 2007) that bob is now slang for a pound in his part of the world (Bath, South-West England), and has also been used as money slang, presumably for Australian dollars, on the Home and Away TV soap series. A popular slang word like bob arguably develops a life of its own. Additionally (ack Martin Symington, Jun 2007) the word 'bob' is still commonly used among the white community of Tanzania in East Africa for the Tanzanian Shilling.

Meaning of RECKON

RECKON means: Reckon is slang for to regard as good.

Meaning of nick

nick means: v 1 steal. Something you buy from a dodgy bloke over a pint has quite probably been nicked. In a strange paradox, if a person is described as nicked, it means they’ve been arrested and if a person is in the nick, they’re in prison. 2 condition. Commonly used in the phrase “in good nick,” the word nick refers to the sort of state of repair something is in: Think I’ll buy that car; it seems in pretty nice nick.

Meaning of Substantial

Substantial means: Having good substance; strong; stout; solid; firm; as, substantial cloth; a substantial fence or wall.

Meaning of Illegitimate

Illegitimate means: Not authorized by good usage; not genuine; spurious; as, an illegitimate word.

Meaning of Genuine

Genuine means: Belonging to, or proceeding from, the original stock; native; hence, not counterfeit, spurious, false, or adulterated; authentic; real; natural; true; pure; as, a genuine text; a genuine production; genuine materials.

Meaning of Margin

Margin means: The difference between the cost and the selling price of an article.

Meaning of Solid

Solid means: Fig.: Worthy of credit, trust, or esteem; substantial, as opposed to frivolous or fallacious; weighty; firm; strong; valid; just; genuine.

Meaning of Quid

Quid means: A portion suitable to be chewed; a cud; as, a quid of tobacco.

Meaning of Dubious

Dubious means: Occasioning doubt; not clear, or obvious; equivocal; questionable; doubtful; as, a dubious answer.

Meaning of Dubious

Dubious means: Of uncertain event or issue; as, in dubious battle.

Meaning of Vocable

Vocable means: A word; a term; a name; specifically, a word considered as composed of certain sounds or letters, without regard to its meaning.

Meaning of Monopoly

Monopoly means: The exclusive power, or privilege of selling a commodity; the exclusive power, right, or privilege of dealing in some article, or of trading in some market; sole command of the traffic in anything, however obtained; as, the proprietor of a patented article is given a monopoly of its sale for a limited time; chartered trading companies have sometimes had a monopoly of trade with remote regions; a combination of traders may get a monopoly of a particular product.

Meaning of Th

Th means: In Old English, the article the, when the following word began with a vowel, was often written with elision as if a part of the word. Thus in Chaucer, the forms thabsence, tharray, thegle, thend, thingot, etc., are found for the absence, the array, the eagle, the end, etc.

Meaning of Preposition

Preposition means: A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Meaning of Expound

Expound means: To lay open the meaning of; to explain; to clear of obscurity; to interpret; as, to expound a text of Scripture, a law, a word, a meaning, or a riddle.

Meaning of Primitive

Primitive means: An original or primary word; a word not derived from another; -- opposed to derivative.

Meaning of Abracadabra

Abracadabra means: A mystical word or collocation of letters written as in the figure. Worn on an amulet it was supposed to ward off fever. At present the word is used chiefly in jest to denote something without meaning; jargon.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Cauker

Cauker means: See Cawk, Calker.

Meaning of Eking

Eking means: of Eke

Meaning of Horology

Horology means: The science of measuring time, or the principles and art of constructing instruments for measuring and indicating portions of time, as clocks, watches, dials, etc.

Meaning of Kind

Kind means: Having feelings befitting our common nature; congenial; sympathetic; as, a kind man; a kind heart.

Meaning of Suffocation

Suffocation means: The act of suffocating, or the state of being suffocated; death caused by smothering or choking.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of arse antlers

arse antlers means: Noun. A wide tattoo located at the base of the back, which typically look a little like antlers. Cf. 'tramp stamp'. [Orig. Aust.]

Meaning of Wet Back

Wet Back means: Illegal Mexican Immigrant that swam across the Rio Grande into Texas.

Meaning of weatherboard

weatherboard means: wooden house

Meaning of GRASS BROWNIES

GRASS BROWNIES means: marijuana

Meaning of TURF

TURF means: place where drugs are sold

Tags: Slang Meaning of interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies.. The slang definition of interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies.? Please, add a definition of interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies. if you did not find one from a search of interj the genuine article; good stuff: I was a bit dubious when they were selling Levis for twenty quid, but I reckon they’re pukka. It is derived from the Hindi word “pakka,” meaning “substantial,” and made it to the U.K. via the Colonies..

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