Slang meaning of shop

shop means: n store. What Americans call “shops,” the Brits call “workshops” or “garages.”

What is the slang meaning/definition of shop ?

shop means: n store. What Americans call “shops,” the Brits call “workshops” or “garages.”

Slang definition of shop

shop means: n store. What Americans call “shops,” the Brits call “workshops” or “garages.”

More meanings / definitions of n store. What Americans call “shops,” the Brits call “workshops” or “garages.” or words, sentences containing n store. What Americans call “shops,” the Brits call “workshops” or “garages.”?

Call (v. t.): To utter in a loud or distinct voice; -- often with off; as, to call, or call off, the items of an account; to call the roll of a military company.

Call (n.): The act of calling; -- usually with the voice, but often otherwise, as by signs, the sound of some instrument, or by writing; a summons; an entreaty; an invitation; as, a call for help; the bugle's call.

Reclaim (v. t.): To call back, as a hawk to the wrist in falconry, by a certain customary call.

Reclaim (v. t.): To call back from flight or disorderly action; to call to, for the purpose of subduing or quieting.

Call (n.): A short visit; as, to make a call on a neighbor; also, the daily coming of a tradesman to solicit orders.

Hunt's-up (n.): A tune played on the horn very early in the morning to call out the hunters; hence, any arousing sound or call.

Call (v. t.): To command or request to come or be present; to summon; as, to call a servant.

Challenge (n.): To call to a contest of any kind; to call to answer; to defy.

Cry (v. i.): To make a loud call or cry; to call or exclaim vehemently or earnestly; to shout; to vociferate; to proclaim; to pray; to implore.

Call (v. t.): To invite or command to meet; to convoke; -- often with together; as, the President called Congress together; to appoint and summon; as, to call a meeting of the Board of Aldermen.

Call (v. t.): To state, or estimate, approximately or loosely; to characterize without strict regard to fact; as, they call the distance ten miles; he called it a full day's work.

Cluck (v. t.): To call together, or call to follow, as a hen does her chickens.

Call (v. t.): To summon to the discharge of a particular duty; to designate for an office, or employment, especially of a religious character; -- often used of a divine summons; as, to be called to the ministry; sometimes, to invite; as, to call a minister to be the pastor of a church.

Appeal (v. t.): A call upon a person or an authority for proof or decision, in one's favor; reference to another as witness; a call for help or a favor; entreaty.

Invocation (n.): A call or summons; especially, a judicial call, demand, or order; as, the invocation of papers or evidence into court.

Appeal (v. t.): To call upon another to decide a question controverted, to corroborate a statement, to vindicate one's rights, etc.; as, I appeal to all mankind for the truth of what is alleged. Hence: To call on one for aid; to make earnest request.

Call (n.): The cry of a bird; also a noise or cry in imitation of a bird; or a pipe to call birds by imitating their note or cry.

Provoke (v. t.): To call forth; to call into being or action; esp., to incense to action, a faculty or passion, as love, hate, or ambition; hence, commonly, to incite, as a person, to action by a challenge, by taunts, or by defiance; to exasperate; to irritate; to offend intolerably; to cause to retaliate.

Re- (): A prefix signifying back, against, again, anew; as, recline, to lean back; recall, to call back; recede; remove; reclaim, to call out against; repugn, to fight against; recognition, a knowing again; rejoin, to join again; reiterate; reassure. Combinations containing the prefix re- are readily formed, and are for the most part of obvious signification.

Demand (v. t.): To ask or call for with authority; to claim or seek from, as by authority or right; to claim, as something due; to call for urgently or peremptorily; as, to demand a debt; to demand obedience.

Block (v. t.): A large or long building divided into separate houses or shops, or a number of houses or shops built in contact with each other so as to form one building; a row of houses or shops.

Clepe (v. t.): To call, or name.

Called (imp. & p. p.): of Call

Calling (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Call

Claim (v./.): To call or name.

Threap (v. t.): To call; to name.

Call (n.): See Assessment, 4.

Inquire (v. t.): To call or name.

Nempne (v.): To name or call.

Convocate (v. t.): To convoke; to call together.

Like to add another meaning or definition of n store. What Americans call “shops,” the Brits call “workshops” or “garages.”?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to n store. What Americans call “shops,” the Brits call “workshops” or “garages.”

Meaning of shop

shop means: n store. What Americans call “shops,” the Brits call “workshops” or “garages.”

Meaning of jam

jam means: n jelly. Sort of. What Americans call “jelly” (fruit preserve without fruity-bits in it), Brits still call jam. What Americans call “jello,” Brits call “jelly.” Oh yes, and what Americans call “jam” is still also called jam in the U.K. I think that’s the jams pretty much covered.

Meaning of autumn

autumn means: n season between summer and winter. Americans call it “fall.” Americans, of course, also call it “autumn” which might have you wondering why it’s in here at all. Well, my furry friend, it is in here because Brits never call it “fall.” Think of this entry not so much as “autumn,” but more as “not fall.”

Meaning of jumper

jumper means: n sweater. What Americans call a “jumper” (a set of overalls with a skirt instead of trousers), Brits would call a “pinafore.”

Meaning of bum

bum means: 1 n posterior; pretty much the British equivalent of “butt.” 2 v mooch: Mind if I bum a ride home? or perhaps more amusingly: Can I bum a fag? What the Americans call “bums” Brits call “tramps.”

Meaning of vest

vest means: n undershirt. The item of clothing worn under your shirt. What Americans call a “vest,” Brits call a “waistcoat.”

Meaning of Jock

Jock means: n Scottish person. Similar to the use of “Paddy” to mean an Irish person. The people that Americans call “Jocks”, Brits would call “rugger buggers”.

Meaning of squash

squash means: n cordial; diluted fruit drink. It’s a little outdated - you’d be more likely to find your grandmother offering you “lemon squash” than you would your children. The vegetable that Americans call a “squash,” Brits call a “marrow.”

Meaning of pants

pants means: 1 n underpants. What Americans call “pants,” Brits call “trousers.” 2 interj crap. A general derogatory word: We went to see Andy playing in his band but to be honest they were pants.

Meaning of trolley

trolley means: n 1 shopping cart. The device in which you put your shopping while going around the supermarket. 2 refreshment cart, as seen on trains, planes, in offices and such like. What Americans call “trolleys,” the Brits call “trams.”

Meaning of dado

dado means: n decorative wooden track that some people think is nice to have around walls at the height of a chair back. Those people are blithering morons. Brits also know such a thing as a “dado rail;” Americans call it “wainscoating” or “chair rail.” It is, perhaps fittingly, more popular in mobile homes than in normal homes. To confuse things slightly, a dado to an American carpenter is a slot in a piece of wood (usually for fitting shelves or cabinets) which Brits call a “rebate” or “housing.”

Meaning of football

football means: n soccer. Americans call a different game “football.” It doesn’t require much involvement from feet, and they don’t have a proper ball. Brits call that “American football.” I have a theory about the relative popularities of soccer in the U.K. and American football in the U.S., upon which I shall now expound. In life in general, British people tend to put up with the status quo and keep their fingers crossed, rather than make any conscious effort towards striving for success. Until success lands miraculously upon their doorstep, Brits will pass the time moaning about how difficult their lives are. Americans, on the other hand, like to feel that they’re entirely in control of their own destiny and can shape it in any way they see fit. Americans will go out actively seeking success, and until it arrives they will mercilessly criticise themselves for not trying hard enough to find it. Bear with me, the point is approaching. Soccer is a game with very low scores – it’s not uncommon for a game to end with no scoring at all by either team. American football, on the other hand, has scoring aplenty. The net result of this is that a fairly poor soccer team can win a game just by being a bit lucky. This proves to Brits that success truly is a random thing, and they just need to keep waiting. A bad American football team will never win a game. This proves to Americans that hard work pays off, and that they should continue to better themselves in whatever way they can.

Meaning of brackets

brackets means: n parentheses. The things that Americans call “brackets” [these ones], Brits know better as “square brackets.”

Meaning of pavement

pavement means: n sidewalk. Brits call the part that cars drive on “Tarmac.” I wonder how many holidaymakers have been run over as a result of this confusion. Well, probably none really. I digress. Historically, “sidewalk” is in fact an old, now-unused British English word meaning exactly what the Americans take it to mean.

Meaning of Patience

Patience means: n Solitaire. A card game played alone. I once wrote that the Brits would no doubt start calling it “solitaire” eventually, and some bastard half my age wrote to me to tell me that “mainly older people” call it “patience.” So, sadly, I have to add here that this term is used by “mainly older people.” This reminds me of the time my mother came home in tears when a boy scout had tried to help her across the road. Rather oddly, we Brits also call another game “Solitaire.” Just go and look it up like a man.

Meaning of suspenders

suspenders means: n garters. The things used by women to hold up their stockings. They are not used by men to hold up their trousers (Brits call those devices “braces”) or their socks (they call those things, umm, “garters”).

Meaning of Tube

Tube means: n the London Underground railway. Londoners are clearly not as inspired as Glaswegians, who call theirs the “Clockwork Orange.” In the U.S., these sorts of rail systems are known as “subways” which, no doubt in order to cause confusion, is what the Brits call the walkways which go underneath roads, where tramps live and drunk people urinate.

Meaning of subway

subway means: n underground pedestrian walkway. Built to enable you to cross the road safely, urinate or inject heroin. Brits do not call the London underground train system the “subway.” They call it the “underground.”

Meaning of cot

cot means: n crib. Americans call a sort of frame camp bed a “cot.” Brits don’t. I’d say they just called it a “camp bed,” as God intended. I’m guessing that he intended that. The Bible is fairly ambiguous about which day God chose to create camp beds.

Meaning of bollard

bollard means: n small concrete or metal post generally used to stop cars from driving into certain places. While used only in a nautical context in the U.S., it is accepted universally in the U.K. When not on boats, Americans call them “pylons,” which to Brits are the giant metal structures used to hold up national grid electricity wires.

Meaning of Call

Call means: To utter in a loud or distinct voice; -- often with off; as, to call, or call off, the items of an account; to call the roll of a military company.

Meaning of Call

Call means: The act of calling; -- usually with the voice, but often otherwise, as by signs, the sound of some instrument, or by writing; a summons; an entreaty; an invitation; as, a call for help; the bugle's call.

Meaning of Reclaim

Reclaim means: To call back, as a hawk to the wrist in falconry, by a certain customary call.

Meaning of Reclaim

Reclaim means: To call back from flight or disorderly action; to call to, for the purpose of subduing or quieting.

Meaning of Call

Call means: A short visit; as, to make a call on a neighbor; also, the daily coming of a tradesman to solicit orders.

Meaning of Hunt's-up

Hunt's-up means: A tune played on the horn very early in the morning to call out the hunters; hence, any arousing sound or call.

Meaning of Call

Call means: To command or request to come or be present; to summon; as, to call a servant.

Meaning of Challenge

Challenge means: To call to a contest of any kind; to call to answer; to defy.

Meaning of Cry

Cry means: To make a loud call or cry; to call or exclaim vehemently or earnestly; to shout; to vociferate; to proclaim; to pray; to implore.

Meaning of Call

Call means: To invite or command to meet; to convoke; -- often with together; as, the President called Congress together; to appoint and summon; as, to call a meeting of the Board of Aldermen.

Meaning of Call

Call means: To state, or estimate, approximately or loosely; to characterize without strict regard to fact; as, they call the distance ten miles; he called it a full day's work.

Meaning of Cluck

Cluck means: To call together, or call to follow, as a hen does her chickens.

Meaning of Call

Call means: To summon to the discharge of a particular duty; to designate for an office, or employment, especially of a religious character; -- often used of a divine summons; as, to be called to the ministry; sometimes, to invite; as, to call a minister to be the pastor of a church.

Meaning of Appeal

Appeal means: A call upon a person or an authority for proof or decision, in one's favor; reference to another as witness; a call for help or a favor; entreaty.

Meaning of Invocation

Invocation means: A call or summons; especially, a judicial call, demand, or order; as, the invocation of papers or evidence into court.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Caveator

Caveator means: One who enters a caveat.

Meaning of Coved

Coved means: of Cove

Meaning of Gallop

Gallop means: To cause to gallop.

Meaning of Jar

Jar means: Clash of interest or opinions; collision; discord; debate; slight disagreement.

Meaning of Pentane

Pentane means: Any one of the three metameric hydrocarbons, C5H12, of the methane or paraffin series. They are colorless, volatile liquids, two of which occur in petroleum. So called because of the five carbon atoms in the molecule.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of DEADHEAD

DEADHEAD means: Deadhead is slang for a very stupid, lifeless, boring person. Deadhead is slang for a fan of the rock group 'The Grateful Dead'.Deadhead is American slang for to drive a vehicle empty or without passengers.

Meaning of DO SOMEONE DIRT

DO SOMEONE DIRT means: Do someone dirt is slang for to do something vicious to someone.

Meaning of KOORIE

KOORIE means: Koorie is derogatory New Zealand slang for a Maori.Koorie is New Zealand slang for an unpleasant or unpopular person.Koorie is derogatory Australian slang for an aborigine.

Meaning of STITCH UP

STITCH UP means: Stitch up is slang for cause someone to be convicted, especially by informing on them. Stitch up is slang for secure a deal to one's advantage.Stitch up is slang for a swindle, con or unpleasant situation.

Meaning of mithered

mithered means: Adj. Bothered, hassled. E.g."I can't be mithered to go shopping in town on a Saturday." [North/Midlands use]

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