Slang meaning of sod

sod means: 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal).

What is the slang meaning/definition of sod ?

sod means: 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal).

Slang definition of sod

sod means: 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal).

More meanings / definitions of 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal). or words, sentences containing 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal).?

Abbreviation (n.): The form to which a word or phrase is reduced by contraction and omission; a letter or letters, standing for a word or phrase of which they are a part; as, Gen. for Genesis; U.S.A. for United States of America.

Preposition (n.): A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Import (n.): That which a word, phrase, or document contains as its signification or intention or interpretation of a word, action, event, and the like.

Friend (n.): One not inimical or hostile; one not a foe or enemy; also, one of the same nation, party, kin, etc., whose friendly feelings may be assumed. The word is some times used as a term of friendly address.

Relative (n.): A relative pronoun; a word which relates to, or represents, another word or phrase, called its antecedent; as, the relatives "who", "which", "that".

Attributive (n.): A word that denotes an attribute; esp. a modifying word joined to a noun; an adjective or adjective phrase.

Cry (v. i.): A word or phrase caught up by a party or faction and repeated for effect; as, the party cry of the Tories.

Catchword (n.): A word or phrase caught up and repeated for effect; as, the catchword of a political party, etc.

Parenthesis (n.): A word, phrase, or sentence, by way of comment or explanation, inserted in, or attached to, a sentence which would be grammatically complete without it. It is usually inclosed within curved lines (see def. 2 below), or dashes.

Anagram (n.): Literally, the letters of a word read backwards, but in its usual wider sense, the change or one word or phrase into another by the transposition of its letters. Thus Galenus becomes angelus; William Noy (attorney-general to Charles I., and a laborious man) may be turned into I moyl in law.

Derivative (n.): A word formed from another word, by a prefix or suffix, an internal modification, or some other change; a word which takes its origin from a root.

Syllable (n.): An elementary sound, or a combination of elementary sounds, uttered together, or with a single effort or impulse of the voice, and constituting a word or a part of a word. In other terms, it is a vowel or a diphtong, either by itself or flanked by one or more consonants, the whole produced by a single impulse or utterance. One of the liquids, l, m, n, may fill the place of a vowel in a syllable. Adjoining syllables in a word or phrase need not to be marked off by a pause, but only by such an abatement and renewal, or reenforcement, of the stress as to give the feeling of separate impulses. See Guide to Pronunciation, /275.

Reduplication (n.): The doubling of a stem or syllable (more or less modified), with the effect of changing the time expressed, intensifying the meaning, or making the word more imitative; also, the syllable thus added; as, L. tetuli; poposci.

Phrase (n.): A brief expression, sometimes a single word, but usually two or more words forming an expression by themselves, or being a portion of a sentence; as, an adverbial phrase.

Briticism (n.): A word, phrase, or idiom peculiar to Great Britain; any manner of using a word or words that is peculiar to Great Britain.

Verbal (a.): Having word answering to word; word for word; literal; as, a verbal translation.

Word (v. t.): To express in words; to phrase.

Neologism (n.): A new word, phrase, or expression.

Skimmington (n.): A word employed in the phrase, To ride Skimmington; that is to ride on a horse with a woman, but behind her, facing backward, carrying a distaff, and accompanied by a procession of jeering neighbors making mock music; a cavalcade in ridicule of a henpecked man. The custom was in vogue in parts of England.

Enclitical (v. i.): Affixed; subjoined; -- said of a word or particle which leans back upon the preceding word so as to become a part of it, and to lose its own independent accent, generally varying also the accent of the preceding word.

Conversationism (n.): A word or phrase used in conversation; a colloquialism.

Obsoletism (n.): A disused word or phrase; an archaism.

Fro (adv.): From; away; back or backward; -- now used only in opposition to the word to, in the phrase to and fro, that is, to and from. See To and fro under To.

Accent (n.): A word; a significant tone

Affirmative (n.): A word or phrase expressing affirmation or assent; as, yes, that is so, etc.

Americanism (n.): A word or phrase peculiar to the United States.

Fiddledeedee (interj.): An exclamatory word or phrase, equivalent to nonsense!

Neoterism (n.): An innovation or novelty; a neoteric word or phrase.

Rede (n.): A word or phrase; a motto; a proverb; a wise saw.

Number (n.): The distinction of objects, as one, or more than one (in some languages, as one, or two, or more than two), expressed (usually) by a difference in the form of a word; thus, the singular number and the plural number are the names of the forms of a word indicating the objects denoted or referred to by the word as one, or as more than one.

Like to add another meaning or definition of 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal).?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal).

Meaning of sod

sod means: 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal).

Meaning of Damn

Damn means: Stupid, ludicrous or a (popular) word to express mild aggression. However, that the word Damn can be used or spoken in a way that denotes it as a curse or swear word, as generally looked upon in the United States of America. But speaking the word Damn is not considered to be in this category"

Meaning of Underway

Underway means: Not attached to the shore or the ground in any manner. Usually, but not necessarily, moving through or making way through the water.With respect to a vessel, the word "way" means" motion through the water." (1) Underway Making Way: When you are underway, you are said to be "proceeding from one place "toward" another, whether actually in motion through the water or not." The key phrase is "motion through the water." (2) Underway Not Making Way: When you are adrift, you are underway; that is, your vessel is not tied to the dock, anchored or aground.

Meaning of WORD/ WORD UP/ WORD IS BOND

WORD/ WORD UP/ WORD IS BOND means: To get wild in any situation. To act violent at any given moment. To whyle out on someone for no reason. To act wild in fun without violence. This word was new and still underground until a rape in central park where young black and Hispanic teens were found guilty for brutally beating and raping a white woman. And the press got a hold of the word and used it as the catch phrase for the criminal act.

Meaning of WORD/ WORD UP/ WORD IS BOND

WORD/ WORD UP/ WORD IS BOND means: To get wild in any situation. To act violent at any given moment. To whyle out on someone for no reason. To act wild in fun without violence. This word was new and still underground until a rape in central park where young black and Hispanic teens were found guilty for brutally beating and raping a white woman. And the press got a hold of the word and used it as the catch phrase for the criminal act.

Meaning of Chop

Chop means: A Chinese word signifying quality, first introduced to mariners in the China trade. Soon became a common word of seamen applied to fine silks, teas, tobacco, etc.

Meaning of gormless

gormless means: Derogatory term for an individual of lesser intelligence. Often used in conjunction with the word 'pillock' as in 'Gormless Pillock'. Pillock being another word for a doofus. In Geordieland (North East of England) people say "That blowkie has ner gorm!". (ed: someone mailed in the definition for gorm - but I lost it!)

Meaning of hiney, heine, heiney

hiney, heine, heiney means: Buttocks. An unusual word heard on U.S. sitcoms but with an obscure derivation. One guess was of a corruption of the German word "Hind" (similarly with the word "hinterland). Use of the word can be controversial. Parents use it, e.g. to tell a child "You'll get a smack on your hiney!! Also used in a friendly way to refer to a man's butt, When it's used to refer to a woman's (especially attractive, etc.) behind, then it has a very definite sexually suggestive connotation to it ("woman-child"), and the word used in that context appears to be fairly unacceptable. (ed: I asked for any counter arguments). Caroline writes: I think it is a shortening of "hind end", but it's used a lot in Southern USA. Here is a schoolyard rhyme: I see your hiney so black and shiny, You better hide it before I bite it!" The following fairly comprehensive description of the word in use was sent in by John Gaither from Athens Georgia US: It is (or was, when I was in the single-digit years, before 1965) common in south Georgia, in the southeastern US. Among me and my friends (European Americans) the rhyme was: "I see your hiney So black and shiny It makes me giggle To see it wiggle." My wife (African American) recalls it thus: "I see your hiney So bright and shiny. . . ." The occasion for its recitation was when someone's "hind" end was partly or fully exposed, either by circumstance or design. It was slightly pejorative, as if the singer was laughing at or mocking the person exposed; using the word "black" fits in with this, as calling someone black was also a derogatory statement (for Americans of either European or African ancestry). I conjecture an African American origin, or association with African Americans, from the word "black." (As you may or may not know, skin pigmentation among African Americans is in fact usually darker on the buttocks and the back of the thighs; cf. "kiss my black ass."). It was always sung to the same tune, which makes me wonder if the rhyme originated in some kind of vaudeville or minstrel show, where American performers of European ancestry sometimes wore blackface and used the exaggerated mannerisms and accents of African Americans to comic effect. The rhythm and tune are as follows, as best as I can render it. three eighth-notes, quarter note, dotted quarter note three eighth-notes, quarter note, dotted quarter note (repeat) C-C-C-C-A C-C-C-C-G C-C-C-C-A C-C-C-C-G

Meaning of Arr!( Arrrh!, Arrgh!)

Arr!( Arrrh!, Arrgh!) means: Aye or yes. A word made famous by Robert Newton in the 1950 production of Treasure Island. The word can be used as a verbal pause or to show excitement. (Think of it as universal "you know" or "alright!" in pirate lingo). This one is pure Hollywood.

Meaning of smeg

smeg means: n generic swear word based upon the word “smegma.” Also a popular German kitchen equipment manufacturer, who are no doubt in the process of changing their name. Popularised (and most likely invented) by Rob Naylor, who created the Red Dwarf book and television series.

Meaning of Vamos

Vamos means: A Spanish word signifying let us go.

Meaning of scribs, (skribs, skribsies)

scribs, (skribs, skribsies) means: The crossing of the fingers to provide immunity. An infinitely better word than pax or faynights. It's origins are lost in the mists of time but it's *known* to be one true truce word.

Meaning of git

git means: n a tricky one to define. But, of course, that’s what I’m getting paid the big bucks for. What it doesn’t mean is what The Waltons meant when they said it (“git outta here, John-Boy”). Git is technically an insult but has a twinge of jealousy to it. You’d call someone a git if they’d won the Readers’ Digest Prize Draw, outsmarted you in a battle of wits or been named in Bill Gates’ last will and testament because of a spelling mistake. Like “sod,” it has a friendly tone to it. It may be derived from Arabic, or it may be a contraction of the word “illegitimate.” Or neither.

Meaning of jib (2)

jib (2) means: (1) Describe something that someone does not want to say e.g. a coarse word such as sex or fingering someone. (2) As a word to replace any other word really. An example sentence: did you see that man jibbing along., There are many different forms of the word jibs, including, jibbed, jibbing, jib and jibbified and all of these words are in extensive use in many secondary schools in SE England. Jamie and Adam thought of this word and are proud of how it has been used.

Meaning of scouser

scouser means: n someone from Liverpool. Perhaps more accurately someone with a Liverpool accent. The word comes from “lobscouse,” which was a dish sailors ate, much like Irish Stew - sailors were known as “lobscousers” and the port of Liverpool ended up tagged with the same word. Further back still, the original word may have come from Norway, where today “Lapp Skews” are stewed strips of reindeer meat. Or perhaps it comes from Bangladesh, where “Lump Scouts” is a rare dish made from boy-scouts and served at Christmas. Or from a parallel universe, almost identical to ours, where scousers are people from Birmingham.

Meaning of raghead

raghead means: Vaguely insulting and derogatory terms for anyone who wears a turban - especially if of Arab extraction. The sort of people who use this term pronounce Arab with the emphasis on the 'A' making the word 'A-rab'.

Meaning of piddiful

piddiful means: From the word "pitiful" this word was used as the ultimate put down during lessons when at school. You'd give your best swot-answer, without realising that it was uncool, and hear this murmured "piddiful" from somewhere at the back. You knew you'd lost all street cred for at least a week.

Meaning of berk

berk means: n idiot. Yes, yes, another friendly U.K. word for moron; this one implies a degree of clumsiness: Look, you berk, I said to bend it, not bust it. The word originally derives from the rhyming slang “Berkeley Hunt” (or “Berkshire Hunt”), which rhymes with — well, “punt,” among other words.

Meaning of chuddies

chuddies means: Underwear, usu. female. Contributor believes this word to be a Swahili word for 'knickers' or female underwear. However, it seems the word isn't Swahili at all. In fact it is the Gujarati (an Indian Language) translation of underpants! That's why you say eat my chuddies. It doesnt mean testicles at all! The confusion might have arisen because of Bart Simpson saying it and maybe the Indian comedy 'Goodness Gracious Me' (which hasn't been shown in Australia at least) indianised the phrase to 'Eat my Chuddies'.

Meaning of moh

moh means: A person who is bald, The word is pronounced like the "mo" in "moth". The action associated with this word is less violent than the slap: the perpetrator covers the victim's 'slap' (forehead) with his hand, palm inwards, and utters the word "MmmmmmmmmOH" in a loud voice, while pushing the victim backwards. However, rapid tapping of the finger-tips on the 'slap' can also be used to perpetrate this assault. A sub-varient of this involves the perpetrator holding his hand in a way that suggests knocking at a door, and making a knocking motion, while saying the word. This may be done by wags sitting at the back of a class being taken by a "chrome-dome" (bald teacher, gender non-specific), or in a hallway behind a teacher that you know that if you say it often enough, they'll start to cry.

Meaning of Abbreviation

Abbreviation means: The form to which a word or phrase is reduced by contraction and omission; a letter or letters, standing for a word or phrase of which they are a part; as, Gen. for Genesis; U.S.A. for United States of America.

Meaning of Preposition

Preposition means: A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Meaning of Import

Import means: That which a word, phrase, or document contains as its signification or intention or interpretation of a word, action, event, and the like.

Meaning of Friend

Friend means: One not inimical or hostile; one not a foe or enemy; also, one of the same nation, party, kin, etc., whose friendly feelings may be assumed. The word is some times used as a term of friendly address.

Meaning of Relative

Relative means: A relative pronoun; a word which relates to, or represents, another word or phrase, called its antecedent; as, the relatives "who", "which", "that".

Meaning of Attributive

Attributive means: A word that denotes an attribute; esp. a modifying word joined to a noun; an adjective or adjective phrase.

Meaning of Cry

Cry means: A word or phrase caught up by a party or faction and repeated for effect; as, the party cry of the Tories.

Meaning of Catchword

Catchword means: A word or phrase caught up and repeated for effect; as, the catchword of a political party, etc.

Meaning of Parenthesis

Parenthesis means: A word, phrase, or sentence, by way of comment or explanation, inserted in, or attached to, a sentence which would be grammatically complete without it. It is usually inclosed within curved lines (see def. 2 below), or dashes.

Meaning of Anagram

Anagram means: Literally, the letters of a word read backwards, but in its usual wider sense, the change or one word or phrase into another by the transposition of its letters. Thus Galenus becomes angelus; William Noy (attorney-general to Charles I., and a laborious man) may be turned into I moyl in law.

Meaning of Derivative

Derivative means: A word formed from another word, by a prefix or suffix, an internal modification, or some other change; a word which takes its origin from a root.

Meaning of Syllable

Syllable means: An elementary sound, or a combination of elementary sounds, uttered together, or with a single effort or impulse of the voice, and constituting a word or a part of a word. In other terms, it is a vowel or a diphtong, either by itself or flanked by one or more consonants, the whole produced by a single impulse or utterance. One of the liquids, l, m, n, may fill the place of a vowel in a syllable. Adjoining syllables in a word or phrase need not to be marked off by a pause, but only by such an abatement and renewal, or reenforcement, of the stress as to give the feeling of separate impulses. See Guide to Pronunciation, /275.

Meaning of Reduplication

Reduplication means: The doubling of a stem or syllable (more or less modified), with the effect of changing the time expressed, intensifying the meaning, or making the word more imitative; also, the syllable thus added; as, L. tetuli; poposci.

Meaning of Phrase

Phrase means: A brief expression, sometimes a single word, but usually two or more words forming an expression by themselves, or being a portion of a sentence; as, an adverbial phrase.

Meaning of Briticism

Briticism means: A word, phrase, or idiom peculiar to Great Britain; any manner of using a word or words that is peculiar to Great Britain.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Deceptory

Deceptory means: Deceptive.

Meaning of Freieslebenite

Freieslebenite means: A sulphide of antimony, lead, and silver, occuring in monoclinic crystals.

Meaning of Hurling

Hurling means: of Hurl

Meaning of Immomentous

Immomentous means: Not momentous; unimportant; insignificant.

Meaning of Unability

Unability means: Inability.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of HASSLE

HASSLE means: Hassle is slang for to subject someone to bother, harrassment; intrusive complications.

Meaning of HAVE IT OFF

HAVE IT OFF means: Have it off is British slang for sexual intercourse. Have it off is British slang for to fight.Have it off is British slang for to be successful.

Meaning of Tail-Race

Tail-Race means: The water course leading from a mill after it has passed the water-wheel.

Meaning of LOUSE CAGE

LOUSE CAGE means: Caboose

Tags: Slang Meaning of 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal).. The slang definition of 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal).. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal).? Please, add a definition of 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal). if you did not find one from a search of 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal)..

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