Slang meaning of boot

boot means: Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!)

What is the slang meaning/definition of boot ?

boot means: Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!)

Slang definition of boot

boot means: Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!)

More meanings / definitions of Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!) or words, sentences containing Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!)?

Weregild (n.): The price of a man's head; a compensation paid of a man killed, partly to the king for the loss of a subject, partly to the lord of a vassal, and partly to the next of kin. It was paid by the murderer.

Learn (v. t.): To gain knowledge or information of; to ascertain by inquiry, study, or investigation; to receive instruction concerning; to fix in the mind; to acquire understanding of, or skill; as, to learn the way; to learn a lesson; to learn dancing; to learn to skate; to learn the violin; to learn the truth about something.

Amortization (n.): The extinction of a debt, usually by means of a sinking fund; also, the money thus paid.

Understand (v. t.): To be apprised, or have information, of; to learn; to be informed of; to hear; as, I understand that Congress has passed the bill.

Manbote (n.): A sum paid to a lord as a pecuniary compensation for killing his man (that is, his vassal, servant, or tenant).

Price (n. & v.): The sum or amount of money at which a thing is valued, or the value which a seller sets on his goods in market; that for which something is bought or sold, or offered for sale; equivalent in money or other means of exchange; current value or rate paid or demanded in market or in barter; cost.

Bonus (n.): Money paid in addition to a stated compensation.

Hire (n.): The price, reward, or compensation paid, or contracted to be paid, for the temporary use of a thing or a place, for personal service, or for labor; wages; rent; pay.

Reward (n.): Compensation or remuneration for services; a sum of money paid or taken for doing, or forbearing to do, some act.

Half-boot (n.): A boot with a short top covering only the ankle. See Cocker, and Congress boot, under Congress.

Usury (v. t.): A premium or increase paid, or stipulated to be paid, for a loan, as of money; interest.

Anglo-Saxondom (n.): The Anglo-Saxon domain (i. e., Great Britain and the United States, etc.); the Anglo-Saxon race.

Anglo-Saxonism (n.): A characteristic of the Anglo-Saxon race; especially, a word or an idiom of the Anglo-Saxon tongue.

Boottree (n.): An instrument to stretch and widen the leg of a boot, consisting of two pieces, together shaped like a leg, between which, when put into the boot, a wedge is driven.

Rep-silver (n.): Money anciently paid by servile tenants to their lord, in lieu of the customary service of reaping his corn or grain.

Anglo-Saxon (n.): A Saxon of Britain, that is, an English Saxon, or one the Saxons who settled in England, as distinguished from a continental (or "Old") Saxon.

Bottine (n.): A small boot; a lady's boot.

Bootee (n.): A half boot or short boot.

Point (n.): An item of private information; a hint; a tip; a pointer.

Consulage (n.): A duty or tax paid by merchants for the protection of their commerce by means of a consul in a foreign place.

Drawback (n.): Money paid back or remitted; especially, a certain amount of duties or customs, sometimes the whole, and sometimes only a part, remitted or paid back by the government, on the exportation of the commodities on which they were levied.

Payee (n.): The person to whom money is to be, or has been, paid; the person named in a bill or note, to whom, or to whose order, the amount is promised or directed to be paid. See Bill of exchange, under Bill.

Suggestion (n.): Information without oath; an entry of a material fact or circumstance on the record for the information of the court, at the death or insolvency of a party.

Damage (n.): The estimated reparation in money for detriment or injury sustained; a compensation, recompense, or satisfaction to one party, for a wrong or injury actually done to him by another.

Refresher (n.): An extra fee paid to counsel in a case that has been adjourned from one term to another, or that is unusually protracted.

Loss (v. t.): Destruction or diminution of value, if brought about in a manner provided for in the insurance contract (as destruction by fire or wreck, damage by water or smoke), or the death or injury of an insured person; also, the sum paid or payable therefor; as, the losses of the company this year amount to a million of dollars.

Hallage (n.): A fee or toll paid for goods sold in a hall.

Pump (v. t.): Figuratively, to draw out or obtain, as secrets or money, by persistent questioning or plying; to question or ply persistently in order to elicit something, as information, money, etc.

Resource (n.): Pecuniary means; funds; money, or any property that can be converted into supplies; available means or capabilities of any kind.

Boot (v. i.): To boot one's self; to put on one's boots.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!)?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!)

Meaning of boot

boot means: Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!)

Meaning of Put paid to

Put paid to means: This is an expression which means to put an end to something. For example you could say that rain put paid to the cricket match, meaning it stopped play.

Meaning of Put paid to

Put paid to means: This is an expression which means to put an end to something. For example you could say that rain put paid to the cricket match, meaning it stopped play.

Meaning of Blood Money

Blood Money means: Originally known as bounty money, it was the financial reward for sinking an enemy ship. Today blood money refers to money paid by a killer as compensation to the next of kin of a murder victim or money gained at the cost of another's life or livelihood.

Meaning of Workers Compensation Attorney

Workers Compensation Attorney means: Address : 505 N Tustin Ave #103, Santa Ana, CA 92705

Phone : 949-423-3212

Email : [email protected]

Website : https://www.orangecountyworkerscompensation.com/

Hours : Available 24hrs

Payment : cash, credit/debit cards, cashier's checks, money orders

Keywords : Compensation Attorney at Santa Ana, CA Attorney,Santa Ana at law

Description : At Orange County Workers Compensation Attorney, we understand how many lines of work expose employees to extreme danger of sudden injury and disability OR of chronic injuries through repetitive motions and daily stress. We stand ready to assist you in securing your rightful workers compensation benefits to remove the financial burden that may now be weighing down on you due to a work-related injury.

Meaning of PUT THE BOOT IN

PUT THE BOOT IN means: Put the boot in is slang for to kick a person, especially when he is already down. Put the boot in is slang for to harass someone or aggravate a problem.Put the boot in is slang for to finish off. something with unnecessary brutality.

Meaning of Dawg 

Dawg  means: an expression used to address a close friend or meaningful acquaintance (one Urban Dictionary contributor notes that the expression was so overused by Randy Jackson of American Idol that it's lost popularity)

Meaning of boot

boot means: Noun. 1. An unattractive person. 2. As the boot, meaning the 'sack', termination of employment. See 'give one the boot.'

Meaning of BOOT

BOOT means: Boot is Black−American slang for to explain.Boot is American slang for a navy or marine recruit, especially one in training. Boot is Americanslang for to vomit.

Meaning of boot boys

boot boys means: Tough guy, 'Hard case'. Orginating from the Skin/Suedehead era. The name was orginally another name for a skinhead who wore Doc Marten boots but lasted into the mid to late 70's. For instance a group of young lads who wanted to sound or act tough might call themselves 'The Victoria Park Boot Boys', The book 'Boot boys' by Richard Allen was a big seller in the early 70's, the story of an ex skinhead who still enjoys a spot of aggro.

Meaning of boot

boot means: n trunk of a car. The boot of a car is the part you keep your belongings in. So called because it was originally known as a “boot locker” — whether it used to be commonplace to drive in one’s socks is anyone’s guess.

Meaning of Paid Off

Paid Off means: To decommission a ship, or to terminate its career in. The term "paid off" is used in British Commonwealth contexts. Originated in the age-of-sail practice of ending an ship's commission and paying the crew their wages once the ship had completed its voyage.

Meaning of Primage

Primage means: Money paid by shipper to Master of ship for diligence in care of cargo. Not now paid to Master, but added to freight. Amount was usually about 1% of freight.

Meaning of Gen

Gen means: - Gen means information. If you have the gen then you know what is going on.

Meaning of Gen

Gen means: Gen means information. If you have the gen then you know what is going on.

Meaning of ANGLO

ANGLO means: Anglo is slang for a person of anglo−saxon ethnic origin.

Meaning of Nautical Almanac

Nautical Almanac means: An annual publication that contains tidal information and information about the position of the sun, moon, planets and stars. This information is used for celestial navigation.

Meaning of Peanuts

Peanuts means: - I hated one of my summer jobs as a kid because it paid peanuts. The full expression is that if you pay peanuts, you get monkeys. It is a fairly derogatory way of saying that manual labour doesn't need to be bright and doesn't need a lot of pay. Typically these days peanuts means something is cheap. For example we would say the petrol in the USA is peanuts or costs peanuts. Compared to our prices it is.

Meaning of Peanuts

Peanuts means: I hated one of my summer jobs as a kid because it paid peanuts. The full expression is that if you pay peanuts, you get monkeys. It is a fairly derogatory way of saying that manual labour doesn't need to be bright and doesn't need a lot of pay. Typically these days peanuts means something is cheap. For example we would say the petrol in the USA is peanuts or costs peanuts. Compared to our prices it is.

Meaning of boot

boot means: Someone of legal age who buys liquor for minors. I hear Ken got the boot at work today.

Meaning of Weregild

Weregild means: The price of a man's head; a compensation paid of a man killed, partly to the king for the loss of a subject, partly to the lord of a vassal, and partly to the next of kin. It was paid by the murderer.

Meaning of Learn

Learn means: To gain knowledge or information of; to ascertain by inquiry, study, or investigation; to receive instruction concerning; to fix in the mind; to acquire understanding of, or skill; as, to learn the way; to learn a lesson; to learn dancing; to learn to skate; to learn the violin; to learn the truth about something.

Meaning of Amortization

Amortization means: The extinction of a debt, usually by means of a sinking fund; also, the money thus paid.

Meaning of Understand

Understand means: To be apprised, or have information, of; to learn; to be informed of; to hear; as, I understand that Congress has passed the bill.

Meaning of Manbote

Manbote means: A sum paid to a lord as a pecuniary compensation for killing his man (that is, his vassal, servant, or tenant).

Meaning of Price

Price means: The sum or amount of money at which a thing is valued, or the value which a seller sets on his goods in market; that for which something is bought or sold, or offered for sale; equivalent in money or other means of exchange; current value or rate paid or demanded in market or in barter; cost.

Meaning of Bonus

Bonus means: Money paid in addition to a stated compensation.

Meaning of Hire

Hire means: The price, reward, or compensation paid, or contracted to be paid, for the temporary use of a thing or a place, for personal service, or for labor; wages; rent; pay.

Meaning of Reward

Reward means: Compensation or remuneration for services; a sum of money paid or taken for doing, or forbearing to do, some act.

Meaning of Half-boot

Half-boot means: A boot with a short top covering only the ankle. See Cocker, and Congress boot, under Congress.

Meaning of Usury

Usury means: A premium or increase paid, or stipulated to be paid, for a loan, as of money; interest.

Meaning of Anglo-Saxondom

Anglo-Saxondom means: The Anglo-Saxon domain (i. e., Great Britain and the United States, etc.); the Anglo-Saxon race.

Meaning of Anglo-Saxonism

Anglo-Saxonism means: A characteristic of the Anglo-Saxon race; especially, a word or an idiom of the Anglo-Saxon tongue.

Meaning of Boottree

Boottree means: An instrument to stretch and widen the leg of a boot, consisting of two pieces, together shaped like a leg, between which, when put into the boot, a wedge is driven.

Meaning of Rep-silver

Rep-silver means: Money anciently paid by servile tenants to their lord, in lieu of the customary service of reaping his corn or grain.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Disimbitter

Disimbitter means: To free from bitterness.

Meaning of Myroxylon

Myroxylon means: A genus of leguminous trees of tropical America, the different species of which yield balsamic products, among which are balsam of Peru, and balsam of Tolu. The species were formerly referred to Myrospermum.

Meaning of Sea-green

Sea-green means: Of a beautiful bluish green color, like sea water on soundings.

Meaning of Straight

Straight means: In a straight manner; directly; rightly; forthwith; immediately; as, the arrow went straight to the mark.

Meaning of Ungraceful

Ungraceful means: Not graceful; not marked with ease and dignity; deficient in beauty and elegance; inelegant; awkward; as, ungraceful manners; ungraceful speech.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of SWEET PEA

SWEET PEA means: Sweet pea was old London Cockney rhyming slang for tea.

Meaning of Rap

Rap means: To tattle on someone (Beats)

Meaning of PETER PAN

PETER PAN means: PCP

Meaning of betty

betty means: A girl. Don't get so bent out of shape.

Tags: Slang Meaning of Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!). The slang definition of Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!). Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!)? Please, add a definition of Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!) if you did not find one from a search of Means "as well" but implies an unexpected extra, e.g. "I not only lost my job but they prosecuted me to boot!!", or "Not only did I get into the disco, free - but I won a "spot prize" to boot!" (ed: this is an interesting expression that I've often used - does anyone have any clues where it originated and how?) Notes Serves me right for asking I suppose, but Steve Shervais passed on the following useful information: According to Clark Hall's Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, "bot" is 'compensation for an injury', and "to bot" means "besides, moreover." In a related item, "manbot" was the money paid to the lord for loss of a man,_in_addition_to_ the wergeld paid to his relatives. (ed: I like this job... you learn *such* a lot of useless information!).

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