Slang meaning of dirk

dirk means: Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk.

What is the slang meaning/definition of dirk ?

dirk means: Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk.

Slang definition of dirk

dirk means: Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk.

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More meanings / definitions of Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk. or words, sentences containing Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk.?

Dirk (v. t.): To stab with a dirk.

Dirk (a.): Dark.

Dirk (v. t.): To darken.

Dirked (imp. & p. p.): of Dirk

Dirking (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Dirk

Dirk (n.): A kind of dagger or poniard; -- formerly much used by the Scottish Highlander.

Year (n.): The time of the apparent revolution of the sun trough the ecliptic; the period occupied by the earth in making its revolution around the sun, called the astronomical year; also, a period more or less nearly agreeing with this, adopted by various nations as a measure of time, and called the civil year; as, the common lunar year of 354 days, still in use among the Mohammedans; the year of 360 days, etc. In common usage, the year consists of 365 days, and every fourth year (called bissextile, or leap year) of 366 days, a day being added to February on that year, on account of the excess above 365 days (see Bissextile).

Dagger (n.): A short weapon used for stabbing. This is the general term: cf. Poniard, Stiletto, Bowie knife, Dirk, Misericorde, Anlace.

Insulting (a.): Containing, or characterized by, insult or abuse; tending to insult or affront; as, insulting language, treatment, etc.

Taunt (v. t.): To reproach with severe or insulting words; to revile; to upbraid; to jeer at; to flout.

Abuse (v. t.): Vituperative words; coarse, insulting speech; abusive language; virulent condemnation; reviling.

Insolent (a.): Proceeding from or characterized by insolence; insulting; as, insolent words or behavior.

Abusive (a.): Practicing abuse; prone to ill treat by coarse, insulting words or by other ill usage; as, an abusive author; an abusive fellow.

Leap year (): Bissextile; a year containing 366 days; every fourth year which leaps over a day more than a common year, giving to February twenty-nine days. See Bissextile.

Insulting (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Insult

Railing (a.): Expressing reproach; insulting.

Railingly (adv.): With scoffing or insulting language.

Insultation (n.): The act of insulting; abusive or insolent treatment; insult.

Satirical (a.): Censorious; severe in language; sarcastic; insulting.

Taunt (n.): Upbraiding language; bitter or sarcastic reproach; insulting invective.

February (n.): The second month in the year, said to have been introduced into the Roman calendar by Numa. In common years this month contains twenty-eight days; in the bissextile, or leap year, it has twenty-nine days.

Bissextile (n.): Leap year; every fourth year, in which a day is added to the month of February on account of the excess of the tropical year (365 d. 5 h. 48 m. 46 s.) above 365 days. But one day added every four years is equivalent to six hours each year, which is 11 m. 14 s. more than the excess of the real year. Hence, it is necessary to suppress the bissextile day at the end of every century which is not divisible by 400, while it is retained at the end of those which are divisible by 400.

Mockery (n.): Insulting or contemptuous action or speech; contemptuous merriment; derision; ridicule.

Effete (a.): No longer capable of producing young, as an animal, or fruit, as the earth; hence, worn out with age; exhausted of energy; incapable of efficient action; no longer productive; barren; sterile.

Assault (n.): To make an assault upon, as by a sudden rush of armed men; to attack with unlawful or insulting physical violence or menaces.

Calendar (n.): An orderly arrangement of the division of time, adapted to the purposes of civil life, as years, months, weeks, and days; also, a register of the year with its divisions; an almanac.

Effrontery (n.): Impudence or boldness in confronting or in transgressing the bounds of duty or decorum; insulting presumptuousness; shameless boldness; barefaced assurance.

Embolism (n.): Intercalation; the insertion of days, months, or years, in an account of time, to produce regularity; as, the embolism of a lunar month in the Greek year.

Pronounce (v. t.): To utter articulately; to speak out or distinctly; to utter, as words or syllables; to speak with the proper sound and accent as, adults rarely learn to pronounce a foreign language correctly.

Energy (n.): Strength of expression; force of utterance; power to impress the mind and arouse the feelings; life; spirit; -- said of speech, language, words, style; as, a style full of energy.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk.

Meaning of dirk

dirk means: Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk.

Meaning of dirk brain

dirk brain means: Extension of Dirk, used when someone has done something stupid or has been particularly slow to pick something up. Similar to Dickhead or knobhead. (ed: I think this is a misheard variation on der brain)

Meaning of dirk

dirk means: Eighteeth-century expressions for penis.

Meaning of Dirk

Dirk means: A long thin knife. It was used for fighting in close quarters, as well as cutting rope.

Meaning of Dirk

Dirk means: (1) Scots word for a short dagger; sometimes a cut-down sword blade mounted on a dagger It was used for fighting in close quarters, as well as cutting rope. (2) A small naval sword worn by midshipmen or their equivalents when in full dress uniform.

Meaning of raghead

raghead means: Vaguely insulting and derogatory terms for anyone who wears a turban - especially if of Arab extraction. The sort of people who use this term pronounce Arab with the emphasis on the 'A' making the word 'A-rab'.

Meaning of gummer

gummer means: Insulting term used to refer to grade nine students. Contributor has no idea about the origin, but knows that gummers were fair game for any manner of hazing in that first (long) year of high school.

Meaning of sherring

sherring means: Refers in an insulting manner to a 'first year' at school. Probably comes from squashing together "fresh herring" originally but nobody seems to know for sure. This might be specific to King Edward's School, Birmingham UK as I've never heard of it used elsewhere. A good word though I think. (ed: indeed it is... got any more?)

Meaning of moo

moo means: Euphamism for 'cow' - as if one was needed! Introduced by the Alf Garnett (Warren Mitchell) character in the 1960's sitcom "For better or worse", as a less offensive way of insulting his wife Else (Dandy Nicholls). From the classic days of British comedy.

Meaning of Toe-Rag

Toe-Rag means: Fag (cigarette). Lend us a sprarsy - I wanna get some toe-rags. Toe-rags refer to the rags people used to wrap around their feet when they didn't have shoes... we used to call our socks toe-rags which is probably the same origin. He also says his old dad used to call some people a toe-rag and suspects it might have been an insult (reference to fag = queer). Toe rag couls also refer to a small time petty thief, in his words "the sort of dirty little toe rag who would live next door and break into your house and nick the Christmas presents", "term is commonly used, at least in Scotland, meaning just a bit stronger than "rascal" and probably spelled without the e: 'You little torag.' I always thought it did come from terms used to refer to travelling people.

Meaning of for coughs and colds, take beechams!

for coughs and colds, take beechams! means: Wordplay-employing phrase based on an advertising slogan. Used as a subversive means of insulting someone. The first two words spoken quickly i.e. 'for coughs', sounds like 'fuck off'). (ed: Beechams - for those who want to be bored - is the name of a cold rememdy in the UK. It used to be sold as 'little pills', then later in powwder form. As I recall it was mainly powdered aspirin)

Meaning of yonks

yonks means: Used, especially in Swansea area of South Wales to signify 'a long time' (says Clem). Also used in Australia with the same meaning.Originated as an army abbreviation for an undefined period of time i.e. "Years, months, weeks, days", in other words "It'll be ready when it's done."

Meaning of gold label

gold label means: 12% proof beer which is topped up to a pint with R White's Lemonade and consumed by fifteen year olds in the backroom of the local "safe pub".

Meaning of Prat

Prat means: mildly insulting name

Meaning of FASSY

FASSY means: - very insulting, e.g. you a big fassyhole.

Meaning of Moo Poo

Moo Poo means: Mildly insulting word for woman.

Meaning of dis | diss

dis | diss means: to show disrespect to someone by saying or doing something insulting

Meaning of myout

myout means: Myout' (pronounced my-yoot) derived from 'my youth' a derogatory term used by older kids when talking to younger (or sometimes older - its even more insulting) kids to call them over. Used as: kid1: myout' get you rassclat over ere kid2: what-a gwan man kid1: notin myout, me jus wan you here!

Meaning of pencil dick

pencil dick means: Insulting term - self explanatory.

Meaning of slope

slope means: Insulting term for Vietnamese people.

Meaning of Dirk

Dirk means: To stab with a dirk.

Meaning of Dirk

Dirk means: Dark.

Meaning of Dirk

Dirk means: To darken.

Meaning of Dirked

Dirked means: of Dirk

Meaning of Dirking

Dirking means: of Dirk

Meaning of Dirk

Dirk means: A kind of dagger or poniard; -- formerly much used by the Scottish Highlander.

Meaning of Year

Year means: The time of the apparent revolution of the sun trough the ecliptic; the period occupied by the earth in making its revolution around the sun, called the astronomical year; also, a period more or less nearly agreeing with this, adopted by various nations as a measure of time, and called the civil year; as, the common lunar year of 354 days, still in use among the Mohammedans; the year of 360 days, etc. In common usage, the year consists of 365 days, and every fourth year (called bissextile, or leap year) of 366 days, a day being added to February on that year, on account of the excess above 365 days (see Bissextile).

Meaning of Dagger

Dagger means: A short weapon used for stabbing. This is the general term: cf. Poniard, Stiletto, Bowie knife, Dirk, Misericorde, Anlace.

Meaning of Insulting

Insulting means: Containing, or characterized by, insult or abuse; tending to insult or affront; as, insulting language, treatment, etc.

Meaning of Taunt

Taunt means: To reproach with severe or insulting words; to revile; to upbraid; to jeer at; to flout.

Meaning of Abuse

Abuse means: Vituperative words; coarse, insulting speech; abusive language; virulent condemnation; reviling.

Meaning of Insolent

Insolent means: Proceeding from or characterized by insolence; insulting; as, insolent words or behavior.

Meaning of Abusive

Abusive means: Practicing abuse; prone to ill treat by coarse, insulting words or by other ill usage; as, an abusive author; an abusive fellow.

Meaning of Leap year

Leap year means: Bissextile; a year containing 366 days; every fourth year which leaps over a day more than a common year, giving to February twenty-nine days. See Bissextile.

Meaning of Insulting

Insulting means: of Insult

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Decipheress

Decipheress means: A woman who deciphers.

Meaning of Fluted

Fluted means: Decorated with flutes; channeled; grooved; as, a fluted column; a fluted ruffle; a fluted spectrum.

Meaning of Pourer

Pourer means: One who pours.

Meaning of Reliquidate

Reliquidate means: To liquidate anew; to adjust a second time.

Meaning of Sized

Sized means: of Size

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of BUG OUT

BUG OUT means: Bug out is slang for to depart hurriedly; run away; retreat.

Meaning of SNOW

SNOW means: Snow is slang for cocaine.Snow is British slang for silver coins.Snow is Black slang for a white person.Snow is American and Canadian slang for to deceive or overwhelm with elaborate often insinceretalk.

Meaning of Bring Down or Bringdown

Bring Down or Bringdown means: As a verb - to depress. As a noun - one who depresses.Hey, man, don't "bring me down" with all of this crazy talk.Hey, let's get out of here, that guy is a real "bringdown."

Meaning of rockin'

rockin' means: v. to wear something, generally in a ‘show-off’ type of way.  "Did you see Genine rockin’ her skinny jeans yesterday?" 

Meaning of CHINESE MOLASSES

CHINESE MOLASSES means: opium

Tags: Slang Meaning of Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk.. The slang definition of Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk.? Please, add a definition of Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk. if you did not find one from a search of Dirk was used in exactly the same was as knob is this these days, i.e. "You stupid dirk!" Used when you didn't have time or energy to pronounce all the sylables in longer more insulting words (which were probably a bit gay and not at all insulting really - well for 5-8 year olds that is) you would call them a dirk..

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