Slang meaning of honkin

honkin means: honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa

What is the slang meaning/definition of honkin ?

honkin means: honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa

Slang definition of honkin

honkin means: honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa

More meanings / definitions of honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa or words, sentences containing honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa?

Adjective (n.): A word used with a noun, or substantive, to express a quality of the thing named, or something attributed to it, or to limit or define it, or to specify or describe a thing, as distinct from something else. Thus, in phrase, "a wise ruler," wise is the adjective, expressing a property of ruler.

Attributive (n.): A word that denotes an attribute; esp. a modifying word joined to a noun; an adjective or adjective phrase.

Folks (n. collect. & pl.): People in general, or a separate class of people; -- generally used in the plural form, and often with a qualifying adjective; as, the old folks; poor folks.

Adjective (n.): Added to a substantive as an attribute; of the nature of an adjunct; as, an adjective word or sentence.

Syllable (n.): An elementary sound, or a combination of elementary sounds, uttered together, or with a single effort or impulse of the voice, and constituting a word or a part of a word. In other terms, it is a vowel or a diphtong, either by itself or flanked by one or more consonants, the whole produced by a single impulse or utterance. One of the liquids, l, m, n, may fill the place of a vowel in a syllable. Adjoining syllables in a word or phrase need not to be marked off by a pause, but only by such an abatement and renewal, or reenforcement, of the stress as to give the feeling of separate impulses. See Guide to Pronunciation, /275.

Adjective (v. t.): To make an adjective of; to form or change into an adjective.

Depth (n.): The quality of being deep; deepness; perpendicular measurement downward from the surface, or horizontal measurement backward from the front; as, the depth of a river; the depth of a body of troops.

Montem (n.): A custom, formerly practiced by the scholars at Eton school, England, of going every third year, on Whittuesday, to a hillock near the Bath road, and exacting money from all passers-by, to support at the university the senior scholar of the school.

Exact (a.): Precisely agreeing with a standard, a fact, or the truth; perfectly conforming; neither exceeding nor falling short in any respect; true; correct; precise; as, the clock keeps exact time; he paid the exact debt; an exact copy of a letter; exact accounts.

Picnic (v. i.): To go on a picnic, or pleasure excursion; to eat in public fashion.

Bossism (n.): The rule or practices of bosses, esp. political bosses.

Volta-electrometer (n.): An instrument for the exact measurement of electric currents.

Describe (v. t.): To represent by drawing; to draw a plan of; to delineate; to trace or mark out; as, to describe a circle by the compasses; a torch waved about the head in such a way as to describe a circle.

Ampersand (n.): A word used to describe the character /, /, or &.

Case (n.): One of the forms, or the inflections or changes of form, of a noun, pronoun, or adjective, which indicate its relation to other words, and in the aggregate constitute its declension; the relation which a noun or pronoun sustains to some other word.

Target (n.): The pattern or arrangement of a series of hits made by a marksman on a butt or mark; as, he made a good target.

Junior (n.): Hence: One of a lower or later standing; specifically, in American colleges, one in the third year of his course, one in the fourth or final year being designated a senior; in some seminaries, one in the first year, in others, one in the second year, of a three years' course.

Saddlebow (n.): The bow or arch in the front part of a saddle, or the pieces which form the front.

Year (n.): The time of the apparent revolution of the sun trough the ecliptic; the period occupied by the earth in making its revolution around the sun, called the astronomical year; also, a period more or less nearly agreeing with this, adopted by various nations as a measure of time, and called the civil year; as, the common lunar year of 354 days, still in use among the Mohammedans; the year of 360 days, etc. In common usage, the year consists of 365 days, and every fourth year (called bissextile, or leap year) of 366 days, a day being added to February on that year, on account of the excess above 365 days (see Bissextile).

Exact (a.): Habitually careful to agree with a standard, a rule, or a promise; accurate; methodical; punctual; as, a man exact in observing an appointment; in my doings I was exact.

Front (v. t.): To adorn in front; to supply a front to; as, to front a house with marble; to front a head with laurel.

Early (adv.): In advance of the usual or appointed time; in good season; prior in time; among or near the first; -- opposed to late; as, the early bird; an early spring; early fruit.

Butt (v. i.): To join at the butt, end, or outward extremity; to terminate; to be bounded; to abut.

Participle (n.): A part of speech partaking of the nature both verb and adjective; a form of a verb, or verbal adjective, modifying a noun, but taking the adjuncts of the verb from which it is derived. In the sentences: a letter is written; being asleep he did not hear; exhausted by toil he will sleep soundly, -- written, being, and exhaustedare participles.

Term (n.): In universities, schools, etc., a definite continuous period during which instruction is regularly given to students; as, the school year is divided into three terms.

Empeople (v. t.): To form into a people or community; to inhabit; to people.

Bend (n.): The best quality of sole leather; a butt. See Butt.

New Year's Day (): the first day of a calendar year; the first day of January. Often colloquially abbreviated to New year's or new year.

Storify (v. t.): To form or tell stories of; to narrate or describe in a story.

Picts (n. pl.): A race of people of uncertain origin, who inhabited Scotland in early times.

Like to add another meaning or definition of honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa

Meaning of honkin

honkin means: honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa

Meaning of honkin

honkin means: Oral sex performed on a male, e.g. "honkin' on bobo". Made popular with an album by Aerosmith.

Meaning of honkin

honkin means: Very, extremely. Lance Sterling has a honkin big condo in Scranton.

Meaning of honkin

honkin means: Very, extremely. We're going over to my crib and honk around.

Meaning of hoo-ha

hoo-ha means: An uproar, commotion. Lance Sterling has a honkin big condo in Scranton.

Meaning of it (do ...)

it (do ...) means: Elementary school euphemism for "sex" or "have sex". As a seven-year-old, the contributor knew that if he ever used the word "it" in its original meaning, He'd be mercilessly teased.

Meaning of two sandwiches short of a picnic

two sandwiches short of a picnic means: Phrs. Eccentric, insane, odd. Also phrased as one sandwich short of a picnic.

Meaning of one sandwich short of a picnic

one sandwich short of a picnic means: Phrs. Eccentric, insane, odd. Also as two sandwiches short of a picnic.

Meaning of M.A.S.H.

M.A.S.H. means: (1)Noun(Acronym for: mansion, apartment, shack, house.) An elementary/middle school game that provided random futures. Example: "Last night I played MASH with Susie and I got Johnny as a husband!"

Meaning of cock of the year, ... school

cock of the year, ... school means: Hardest (that is to say, strongest, most dangerous) member (that is to say pupil) of the year/school. Title usually achieved by a series of fights/ scraps with other word be "hards". Eventually one person would come out as hardest/most solid. This person would be best avoided but would probably never be seen at school anyway (owing to them skiving).

Meaning of Damn

Damn means: Stupid, ludicrous or a (popular) word to express mild aggression. However, that the word Damn can be used or spoken in a way that denotes it as a curse or swear word, as generally looked upon in the United States of America. But speaking the word Damn is not considered to be in this category"

Meaning of A.C.E.

A.C.E. means: Used to alienate kids who said "ace". People who originally used "ace" to mean "good" suddenly found that the word had been redefined to mean "crap"., This was used in my part of Sheffield, South Yorkshire during the very early 90s and resulted in the total removal of the word "ace" from the school vocabulary because everyone was confused as to the meaning.

Meaning of sad, saddo, sad case

sad, saddo, sad case means: Commonly used everywhere to describe people who don't fit in, don't have any style, or wear the right clothes to be part of any faction. These people are the nerds and geeks of the world. Sad people are not necessarily miserable, but are often picked on mercilessly, and so don't have a great time at school. (ed: looks like I had a sad time at school... hey that's right!!)

Meaning of chailey

chailey means: Mentally ambiguous. The word 'Chailey' was used to describe a person in exactly the same way as the word 'Joey' or 'Deacon'would have been. The word 'Chailey' was taken from the name of a Special Needs school called Chailey Heritage based about 10 miles from the school. http://www.chaileyheritage.e-sussex.sch.uk

Meaning of hungro

hungro means: Used to describe a male usually, a dirty old man who has a particular 'look' in his eyes while looking at young girls. Used (with horror in the voice) as "What a Hungro", "I wish that Hungro would stop looking at me that way". Contributor said her and a friend made the word up while in Middle school but it quickly spread though the Southern california area for some reason. Considering they were in middle school the term 'dirty old man' seemed to be anyone over the aprox. age of 28. (ed: oops... )

Meaning of sannies

sannies means: Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some.

Meaning of fag

fag means: 1 n cigarette. In very widespread use. One of the most amusing emails I’ve had concerning this word was from an American who had arrived at her company’s U.K. offices to be told that the person she was looking for was “outside blowing a fag.” 2 n first year senior-school kids who have to perform menial tasks (cleaning boots, running errands and the like) for the seniors (slightly antiquated). Another email tells me of a man who was met with aghast looks when he told a group of New Yorkers that he “was a fag at school last year.” Modern thinking on slavery has seen that the practice of fagging all but die out.

Meaning of mallie

mallie means: Homosexual. Used as term of abuse to describe somebody who was gay (or appeared to be). Also used to describe the act of homosexual intercourse (ie. "He mallied him!") f. Allegedly, the word came into use following an incident with a boy named "Malcolm" and another man, but has since found to be untrue. However, the word remained in use at the contributors school in Durham for many years after the supposed event.

Meaning of dairy, dairies

dairy, dairies means: This is weird so I've added it verbatim. Comments welcomed: A group of people found extremly annoying or think they are better than everyone else. Also can be called anything that is made out dairy products used this way: "Damn, it smells like (milk, cheese, milkshake, spoiled milk etc...) doesn't it" you say this in front of the dairy so they have no idea what you are talking about,

Meaning of minter

minter means: At school there was a red haired lad who complained that he was being called ginger minger. The teacher, seemingly unaware of what a minge was and slightly hard of hearing, was nevertheless outraged by the upset caused to this boy and held a special assembly n the school hall. He said that it was no longer acceptable to refer to red haired pupils as 'ginger minters'. As a result the word Minter immediately became the most popular word in the school, being used with gay abandon at anyone who had even the merest hint of ginger in their hair. To my knowledge this term of abuse travelled to a number of universities when the boys in that year left school.

Meaning of Adjective

Adjective means: A word used with a noun, or substantive, to express a quality of the thing named, or something attributed to it, or to limit or define it, or to specify or describe a thing, as distinct from something else. Thus, in phrase, "a wise ruler," wise is the adjective, expressing a property of ruler.

Meaning of Attributive

Attributive means: A word that denotes an attribute; esp. a modifying word joined to a noun; an adjective or adjective phrase.

Meaning of Folks

Folks means: People in general, or a separate class of people; -- generally used in the plural form, and often with a qualifying adjective; as, the old folks; poor folks.

Meaning of Adjective

Adjective means: Added to a substantive as an attribute; of the nature of an adjunct; as, an adjective word or sentence.

Meaning of Syllable

Syllable means: An elementary sound, or a combination of elementary sounds, uttered together, or with a single effort or impulse of the voice, and constituting a word or a part of a word. In other terms, it is a vowel or a diphtong, either by itself or flanked by one or more consonants, the whole produced by a single impulse or utterance. One of the liquids, l, m, n, may fill the place of a vowel in a syllable. Adjoining syllables in a word or phrase need not to be marked off by a pause, but only by such an abatement and renewal, or reenforcement, of the stress as to give the feeling of separate impulses. See Guide to Pronunciation, /275.

Meaning of Adjective

Adjective means: To make an adjective of; to form or change into an adjective.

Meaning of Depth

Depth means: The quality of being deep; deepness; perpendicular measurement downward from the surface, or horizontal measurement backward from the front; as, the depth of a river; the depth of a body of troops.

Meaning of Montem

Montem means: A custom, formerly practiced by the scholars at Eton school, England, of going every third year, on Whittuesday, to a hillock near the Bath road, and exacting money from all passers-by, to support at the university the senior scholar of the school.

Meaning of Exact

Exact means: Precisely agreeing with a standard, a fact, or the truth; perfectly conforming; neither exceeding nor falling short in any respect; true; correct; precise; as, the clock keeps exact time; he paid the exact debt; an exact copy of a letter; exact accounts.

Meaning of Picnic

Picnic means: To go on a picnic, or pleasure excursion; to eat in public fashion.

Meaning of Bossism

Bossism means: The rule or practices of bosses, esp. political bosses.

Meaning of Volta-electrometer

Volta-electrometer means: An instrument for the exact measurement of electric currents.

Meaning of Describe

Describe means: To represent by drawing; to draw a plan of; to delineate; to trace or mark out; as, to describe a circle by the compasses; a torch waved about the head in such a way as to describe a circle.

Meaning of Ampersand

Ampersand means: A word used to describe the character /, /, or &.

Meaning of Case

Case means: One of the forms, or the inflections or changes of form, of a noun, pronoun, or adjective, which indicate its relation to other words, and in the aggregate constitute its declension; the relation which a noun or pronoun sustains to some other word.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Alembroth

Alembroth means: The salt of wisdom of the alchemists, a double salt composed of the chlorides of ammonium and mercury. It was formerly used as a stimulant.

Meaning of Cauliflower

Cauliflower means: An annual variety of Brassica oleracea, or cabbage, of which the cluster of young flower stalks and buds is eaten as a vegetable.

Meaning of Characterize

Characterize means: To indicate the character of; to describe.

Meaning of Cyclist

Cyclist means: A cycler.

Meaning of Sylviculture

Sylviculture means: The cultivation of forest trees for timber or other purposes; forestry; arboriculture.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of glad rags

glad rags means: best clothes ‘She’s in her glad rags.’.¬

Meaning of DM

DM means: Direct Message

Meaning of toffo

toffo means: Another term for sexual intercourse. Convoluted if obvious derivation using rhyming slang from a 1960s and earlier, UK Toffee confection called 'Toff-o-Lux'. This was rather like a Rolo, i,e, in 'tube' form, but made of hard Toffee and no Chocolate coating.

Tags: Slang Meaning of honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa. The slang definition of honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa? Please, add a definition of honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa if you did not find one from a search of honkin was used as an adjective to a form of measurement. described a whole lot of something. i've used it as a kid in elementary school and i'm now 33 and still use it, much to the amusement of my husband. used as "my mom made a whole honkin' lot of sandwiches for the picnic." can also be used to describe people "damn! josie has one big honkin' butt!" i used honkin in front of one of my bosses and he laughed because he used the exact same word. used in very early 80's and petered out a year or so later. midwest usa.

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