Slang meaning of plates of meat

plates of meat means: Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have.

What is the slang meaning/definition of plates of meat ?

plates of meat means: Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have.

Slang definition of plates of meat

plates of meat means: Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have.

More meanings / definitions of Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have. or words, sentences containing Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have.?

Jargon (n.): Confused, unintelligible language; gibberish; hence, an artificial idiom or dialect; cant language; slang.

Anglicism (n.): An English idiom; a phrase or form language peculiar to the English.

Anglicize (v. t.): To make English; to English; to anglify; render conformable to the English idiom, or to English analogies.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Tester (n.): An old French silver coin, originally of the value of about eighteen pence, subsequently reduced to ninepence, and later to sixpence, sterling. Hence, in modern English slang, a sixpence; -- often contracted to tizzy. Called also teston.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Cord (n.): A solid measure, equivalent to 128 cubic feet; a pile of wood, or other coarse material, eight feet long, four feet high, and four feet broad; -- originally measured with a cord or line.

Idiom (n.): The syntactical or structural form peculiar to any language; the genius or cast of a language.

Solecism (n.): An impropriety or incongruity of language in the combination of words or parts of a sentence; esp., deviation from the idiom of a language or from the rules of syntax.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Principal (n.): In English organs the chief open metallic stop, an octave above the open diapason. On the manual it is four feet long, on the pedal eight feet. In Germany this term corresponds to the English open diapason.

Latinism (n.): A Latin idiom; a mode of speech peculiar to Latin; also, a mode of speech in another language, as English, formed on a Latin model.

Sigma (n.): The Greek letter /, /, or / (English S, or s). It originally had the form of the English C.

English (n.): The language of England or of the English nation, and of their descendants in America, India, and other countries.

English (v. t.): To translate into the English language; to Anglicize; hence, to interpret; to explain.

Douay Bible (): A translation of the Scriptures into the English language for the use of English-speaking Roman Catholics; -- done from the Latin Vulgate by English scholars resident in France. The New Testament portion was published at Rheims, A. D. 1582, the Old Testament at Douai, A. D. 1609-10. Various revised editions have since been published.

Cant (n.): Vulgar jargon; slang; the secret language spoker by gipsies, thieves, tramps, or beggars.

Argot (n.): A secret language or conventional slang peculiar to thieves, tramps, and vagabonds; flash.

Germanism (n.): An idiom of the German language.

Acre (n.): A piece of land, containing 160 square rods, or 4,840 square yards, or 43,560 square feet. This is the English statute acre. That of the United States is the same. The Scotch acre was about 1.26 of the English, and the Irish 1.62 of the English.

Grecism (n.): An idiom of the Greek language; a Hellenism.

Arabism (n.): An Arabic idiom peculiarly of language.

Celticism (n.): A custom of the Celts, or an idiom of their language.

Idiom (n.): Dialect; a variant form of a language.

Hebraistic (a.): Pertaining to, or resembling, the Hebrew language or idiom.

Deal (n.): The division of a piece of timber made by sawing; a board or plank; particularly, a board or plank of fir or pine above seven inches in width, and exceeding six feet in length. If narrower than this, it is called a batten; if shorter, a deal end.

Italicism (n.): A phrase or idiom peculiar to the Italian language; to Italianism.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Butcher (v. t.): To kill or slaughter (animals) for food, or for market; as, to butcher hogs.

Idiotism (n.): An idiom; a form, mode of expression, or signification, peculiar to a language.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have.

Meaning of plates of meat

plates of meat means: Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have.

Meaning of BUTCHER'S HOOK

BUTCHER'S HOOK means: Butcher's hook is London Cockney rhyming slang for look.

Meaning of Let's have a butcher's

Let's have a butcher's means: Let me have a look. This was originally butcher's hook to rhyme with look

Meaning of FOREIGN LANGUAGE

FOREIGN LANGUAGE means: Foreign language is London Cockney rhyming slang for sandwich.

Meaning of FEET AND YARDS

FEET AND YARDS means: Feet and yards is London Cockney rhyming slang for playing cards.

Meaning of HANDS AND FEET

HANDS AND FEET means: Hands and feet is London Cockney rhyming slang for meat.

Meaning of BOARD AND PLANK

BOARD AND PLANK means: Board and plank is London Cockney rhyming slang for an American (yank).

Meaning of Cream

Cream means: Originally, to dent a car. Later, to badly damage (hot-rodders, originally)

Meaning of BOARD AND EASEL

BOARD AND EASEL means: Board and easel is London Cockney rhyming slang for diesel.

Meaning of BUTCHER'S

BUTCHER'S means: Butcher's (from Butcher's hook) is British slang for look.

Meaning of Matelot

Matelot means: A sailor, in the French language. English speaking sailors also use this term to describe an ordinary sailor. The term "Matey" was originally derived from this term.

Meaning of butchers

butchers means: Noun. A look. From the Cockney rhyming slang butcher's hook. E.g."Let's have a butchers at it before you put it back."

Meaning of ENGLISH CHANNEL

ENGLISH CHANNEL means: English Channel is London Cockney rhyming slang for panel.

Meaning of plates (of meat)

plates (of meat) means: Noun. Feet. Cockney rhyming slang.

Meaning of Allophone

Allophone means: A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.

Meaning of Allophone

Allophone means: A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.

Meaning of Allophone

Allophone means: A resident of Québec who speaks a first language other than English or French. Used only by linguists in other English-speaking countries, this word has come to be used by journalists and broadcasters, and then by the general public, in some parts of Canada.

Meaning of dollar

dollar means: slang for money, commonly used in singular form, eg., 'Got any dollar?..'. In earlier times a dollar was slang for an English Crown, five shillings (5/-). From the 1900s in England and so called because the coin was similar in appearance and size to the American dollar coin, and at one time similar in value too. Brewer's dictionary of 1870 says that the American dollar is '..in English money a little more than four shillings..'. That's about 20p. The word dollar is originally derived from German 'Thaler', and earlier from Low German 'dahler', meaning a valley (from which we also got the word 'dale'). The connection with coinage is that the Counts of Schlick in the late 1400s mined silver from 'Joachim's Thal' (Joachim's Valley), from which was minted the silver ounce coins called Joachim's Thalers, which became standard coinage in that region of what would now be Germany. All later generic versions of the coins were called 'Thalers'. An 'oxford' was cockney rhyming slang for five shillings (5/-) based on the dollar rhyming slang: 'oxford scholar'.

Meaning of Au fait

Au fait means: Another one of those French expressions that have slipped into the English language. This one means to be familiar with something. I'd say at the end of reading all this you'd be au fait with the differences between American and English!

Meaning of Au fait

Au fait means: Another one of those French expressions that have slipped into the English language. This one means to be familiar with something. I'd say at the end of reading all this you'd be au fait with the differences between American and English!

Meaning of Jargon

Jargon means: Confused, unintelligible language; gibberish; hence, an artificial idiom or dialect; cant language; slang.

Meaning of Anglicism

Anglicism means: An English idiom; a phrase or form language peculiar to the English.

Meaning of Anglicize

Anglicize means: To make English; to English; to anglify; render conformable to the English idiom, or to English analogies.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Tester

Tester means: An old French silver coin, originally of the value of about eighteen pence, subsequently reduced to ninepence, and later to sixpence, sterling. Hence, in modern English slang, a sixpence; -- often contracted to tizzy. Called also teston.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Meaning of Cord

Cord means: A solid measure, equivalent to 128 cubic feet; a pile of wood, or other coarse material, eight feet long, four feet high, and four feet broad; -- originally measured with a cord or line.

Meaning of Idiom

Idiom means: The syntactical or structural form peculiar to any language; the genius or cast of a language.

Meaning of Solecism

Solecism means: An impropriety or incongruity of language in the combination of words or parts of a sentence; esp., deviation from the idiom of a language or from the rules of syntax.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Principal

Principal means: In English organs the chief open metallic stop, an octave above the open diapason. On the manual it is four feet long, on the pedal eight feet. In Germany this term corresponds to the English open diapason.

Meaning of Latinism

Latinism means: A Latin idiom; a mode of speech peculiar to Latin; also, a mode of speech in another language, as English, formed on a Latin model.

Meaning of Sigma

Sigma means: The Greek letter /, /, or / (English S, or s). It originally had the form of the English C.

Meaning of English

English means: The language of England or of the English nation, and of their descendants in America, India, and other countries.

Meaning of English

English means: To translate into the English language; to Anglicize; hence, to interpret; to explain.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Abortifacient

Abortifacient means: Producing miscarriage.

Meaning of Loren

Loren means: of Lose.

Meaning of Misdemean

Misdemean means: To behave ill; -- with a reflexive pronoun; as, to misdemean one's self.

Meaning of Potoroo

Potoroo means: Any small kangaroo belonging to Hypsiprymnus, Bettongia, and allied genera, native of Australia and Tasmania. Called also kangaroo rat.

Meaning of Quirk

Quirk means: A smart retort; a quibble; a shallow conceit.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of NITL

NITL means: Not In This Lifetime

Meaning of CASPER THE GHOST

CASPER THE GHOST means: crack

Meaning of DRAG WEED

DRAG WEED means: marijuana

Meaning of spruce up

spruce up means: To dress up. Mike Hunt will tell you he is going to do something then spruce off just when you need it done.

Tags: Slang Meaning of Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have.. The slang definition of Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have.? Please, add a definition of Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have. if you did not find one from a search of Rhyming slang for feet. Originally a Cockney idiom now taken enthusastically on board by Australians who butcher the English language at will - though have never mutilated it as badly as the Americnas have..

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