Slang meaning of pound

pound means: This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!",

What is the slang meaning/definition of pound ?

pound means: This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!",

Slang definition of pound

pound means: This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!",

More meanings / definitions of This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!", or words, sentences containing This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!",?

Difficult (a.): Hard to manage or to please; not easily wrought upon; austere; stubborn; as, a difficult person.

Piece (n.): A definite portion or quantity, as of goods or work; as, a piece of broadcloth; a piece of wall paper.

Borrow (v. t.): To copy or imitate; to adopt; as, to borrow the style, manner, or opinions of another.

Paper (a.): Of or pertaining to paper; made of paper; resembling paper; existing only on paper; unsubstantial; as, a paper box; a paper army.

Teacher (n.): One who teaches or instructs; one whose business or occupation is to instruct others; an instructor; a tutor.

Aspic (n.): A piece of ordnance carrying a 12 pound shot.

Papillote (n.): a small piece of paper on which women roll up their hair to make it curl; a curl paper.

Appeal (v. t.): An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public.

Rabbi (n.): Master; lord; teacher; -- a Jewish title of respect or honor for a teacher or doctor of the law.

Conveyancing (n.): The business of a conveyancer; the act or business of drawing deeds, leases, or other writings, for transferring the title to property from one person to another.

Pound-breach (n.): The breaking of a public pound for releasing impounded animals.

Paper (v. t.): To cover with paper; to furnish with paper hangings; as, to paper a room or a house.

Poundage (n.): A sum deducted from a pound, or a certain sum paid for each pound; a commission.

Carte blanche (): A blank paper, with a person's signature, etc., at the bottom, given to another person, with permission to superscribe what conditions he pleases. Hence: Unconditional terms; unlimited authority.

Pound (v. t.): To comminute and pulverize by beating; to bruise or break into fine particles with a pestle or other heavy instrument; as, to pound spice or salt.

Teach (v. t.): To direct, as an instructor; to manage, as a preceptor; to guide the studies of; to instruct; to inform; to conduct through a course of studies; as, to teach a child or a class.

Auctioneer (n.): A person who sells by auction; a person whose business it is to dispose of goods or lands by public sale to the highest or best bidder.

Ticklish (a.): Difficult; nice; critical; as, a ticklish business.

Paper (n.): A sheet, leaf, or piece of such substance.

Affair (n.): That which is done or is to be done; matter; concern; as, a difficult affair to manage; business of any kind, commercial, professional, or public; -- often in the plural. "At the head of affairs." Junius.

Bailpiece (n.): A piece of parchment, or paper, containing a recognizance or bail bond.

Coma (n.): A state of profound insensibility from which it is difficult or impossible to rouse a person. See Carus.

Pound (v. t.): To confine in, or as in, a pound; to impound.

Execute (v. t.): To perform, as a piece of music, either on an instrument or with the voice; as, to execute a difficult part brilliantly.

Dynam (n.): A unit of measure for dynamical effect or work; a foot pound. See Foot pound.

Plummet (n.): A piece of lead formerly used by school children to rule paper for writing.

Paper (n.): A medicinal preparation spread upon paper, intended for external application; as, cantharides paper.

Commissioner (n.): A person who has a commission or warrant to perform some office, or execute some business, for the government, corporation, or person employing him; as, a commissioner to take affidavits or to adjust claims.

Roll (v.): A document written on a piece of parchment, paper, or other materials which may be rolled up; a scroll.

Docket (n.): A small piece of paper or parchment, containing the heads of a writing; a summary or digest.

Like to add another meaning or definition of This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!",?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!",

Meaning of pound

pound means: This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!",

Meaning of bunking slip

bunking slip means: Piece of paper to be signed by the teacher of every class on your timetable, then returned to the registration teacher the next day to prove you went to all your classes. Given to bunkers when caught bunking off school.

Meaning of hoja

hoja means: paper; piece of paper. (used in Cono del Sur)

Meaning of Elevator Operator

Elevator Operator means: Non-demanding job for education-less/trade-less person.

Meaning of Cross-staff

Cross-staff means: First used for navigation in 1514, the cross-staff is an instrument used for taking the altitude of the sun or a star to find lattitude. The cross-staff pre-dates the octant and the sextant. The vertical piece, the transom, slides along the staff so that the star can be sighted over the upper edge of the transom while the horizon is aligned with the bottom edge. While more difficult to use than a back-staff, they were still around in the 1700s because they were inexpensive and could be used at night whereas the back-staff was difficult and sometimes impossible to use at night.. It was difficult to use on moving ships, especially in bad weather.

Meaning of Cross-staff

Cross-staff means: First used for navigation in 1514, the cross-staff is an instrument used for taking the altitude of the sun or a star to find lattitude. The cross-staff pre-dates the octant and the sextant. The vertical piece, the transom, slides along the staff so that the star can be sighted over the upper edge of the transom while the horizon is aligned with the bottom edge. While more difficult to use than a back-staff, they were still around in the 1700s because they were inexpensive and could be used at night whereas the back-staff was difficult and sometimes impossible to use at night.. It was difficult to use on moving ships, especially in bad weather.

Meaning of kit

kit means: n sports uniform (e.g. rugby kit, football kit). More generally in the U.K., kit refers to the equipment necessary to perform a particular task - usually, though not always, sporting. The boundary is woolly to such a degree that it’s difficult to generalise - I’ve heard all sorts of things from parachutes to computers referred to as “kit.” nice piece of kit an item particularly good at performing its task in hand. Again it could refer to pretty much anything, though I think you’d be more likely to describe your new camera as a nice piece of kit than, say, your fiancé.

Meaning of PAPER BAG JOB

PAPER BAG JOB means: Paper bag job is slang for an ugly person.

Meaning of BORROW AND BEG

BORROW AND BEG means: Borrow and beg is London Cockney rhyming slang for an egg.

Meaning of floater

floater means: n 1. A corpse found floating in a body of water. 2. A piece of excrement which floats and is difficult to flush down the toilet.

Meaning of Pound sign

Pound sign means: Ever wondered why Brits flounder when voicemail messages say to press the pound sign? What on earth is the British currency doing on a phone anyway? Well, it isn't. To a Brit, the pound sign is the wiggly thing we use to denote the UK pound (or quid), in the same way you have a dollar sign.

Meaning of Pound sign

Pound sign means: Ever wondered why Brits flounder when voicemail messages say to press the pound sign? What on earth is the British currency doing on a phone anyway? Well, it isn't. To a Brit, the pound sign is the wiggly thing we use to denote the UK pound (or quid), in the same way you have a dollar sign.

Meaning of POUND OF BUTTER

POUND OF BUTTER means: Pound of butter is London Cockney rhyming slang for a mad person (nutter).

Meaning of kitchen roll

kitchen roll means: n paper towel. The disposable paper cloth, much akin to a larger, stronger version of toilet paper, that one generally keeps in the kitchen and uses to mop up bits of food and drink that have been inadvertently thrown around. So called, I’d imagine, because Brits keep it in the kitchen and it comes on a roll. Americans call it “paper towel,” no doubt because it’s made of paper and works like a towel.

Meaning of piece

piece means: A disliked individual. Abbreviation of 'piece of shit' or 'piece of work'. Used as e.g. "Adam is such a piece."

Meaning of flim/flimsy

flim/flimsy means: five pounds (£5), early 1900s, so called because of the thin and flimsy paper on which five pound notes of the time were printed.

Meaning of A GRAPE ON THE BUSINESS

A GRAPE ON THE BUSINESS means: A grape on the business is Australian slang for a person whose presence spoils things for others.

Meaning of paper chase

paper chase means: Reading and recording everything on paper. I have to get me some paper if I'm going to the movies tonight.

Meaning of (the) business

(the) business means: Noun. 1. The best. E.g."That new Mini Cooper from BMW is the business." 2. Sexual intercourse. E.g."I was doing the business with her all night."

Meaning of want a piece of...

want a piece of... means: Originally meant to be "attracted to someone", usually in a physical sense; "I want a piece of him.". Since de Niro and 'Taxi Driver' however it's become synonymous with asking if the person you are speaking to wants to fight. ((ed: wasn't that Sly Stallone and Rocky??)

Meaning of Difficult

Difficult means: Hard to manage or to please; not easily wrought upon; austere; stubborn; as, a difficult person.

Meaning of Piece

Piece means: A definite portion or quantity, as of goods or work; as, a piece of broadcloth; a piece of wall paper.

Meaning of Borrow

Borrow means: To copy or imitate; to adopt; as, to borrow the style, manner, or opinions of another.

Meaning of Paper

Paper means: Of or pertaining to paper; made of paper; resembling paper; existing only on paper; unsubstantial; as, a paper box; a paper army.

Meaning of Teacher

Teacher means: One who teaches or instructs; one whose business or occupation is to instruct others; an instructor; a tutor.

Meaning of Aspic

Aspic means: A piece of ordnance carrying a 12 pound shot.

Meaning of Papillote

Papillote means: a small piece of paper on which women roll up their hair to make it curl; a curl paper.

Meaning of Appeal

Appeal means: An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public.

Meaning of Rabbi

Rabbi means: Master; lord; teacher; -- a Jewish title of respect or honor for a teacher or doctor of the law.

Meaning of Conveyancing

Conveyancing means: The business of a conveyancer; the act or business of drawing deeds, leases, or other writings, for transferring the title to property from one person to another.

Meaning of Pound-breach

Pound-breach means: The breaking of a public pound for releasing impounded animals.

Meaning of Paper

Paper means: To cover with paper; to furnish with paper hangings; as, to paper a room or a house.

Meaning of Poundage

Poundage means: A sum deducted from a pound, or a certain sum paid for each pound; a commission.

Meaning of Carte blanche

Carte blanche means: A blank paper, with a person's signature, etc., at the bottom, given to another person, with permission to superscribe what conditions he pleases. Hence: Unconditional terms; unlimited authority.

Meaning of Pound

Pound means: To comminute and pulverize by beating; to bruise or break into fine particles with a pestle or other heavy instrument; as, to pound spice or salt.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Enjoyer

Enjoyer means: One who enjoys.

Meaning of Fresh

Fresh means: Not salt; as, fresh water, in distinction from that which is from the sea, or brackish; fresh meat, in distinction from that which is pickled or salted.

Meaning of Guzzle

Guzzle means: To swallow liquor greedily; to drink much or frequently.

Meaning of Misrehearse

Misrehearse means: To rehearse or quote incorrectly.

Meaning of Ridicule

Ridicule means: Quality of being ridiculous; ridiculousness.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of GEORGE THE THIRD

GEORGE THE THIRD means: George the third is London Cockney rhyming slang for excrement (turd).

Meaning of rat

rat means: A contemptible person. The little rat won't do anything I tell him.

Meaning of all the way

all the way means: To go 'all the way' is to perform/allow sexual intercourse.

Meaning of vogues

vogues means: Wide wheels. Yo, can you give me the vitals on Jims party?

Tags: Slang Meaning of This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!",. The slang definition of This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!",. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!",? Please, add a definition of This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!", if you did not find one from a search of This came from our Business Studies teacher demanding £1 for every piece of paper he photocopied for you. It is used if you want something and the person you're trying to get it from either wants to be difficult, or would rather you not have it. For example: "Can I borrow your CD?"; "Pound!",.

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