Slang meaning of sannies

sannies means: Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some.

What is the slang meaning/definition of sannies ?

sannies means: Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some.

Slang definition of sannies

sannies means: Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some.

More meanings / definitions of Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some. or words, sentences containing Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some.?

Peg (n.): A small, pointed piece of wood, used in fastening boards together, in attaching the soles of boots or shoes, etc.; as, a shoe peg.

Squeak (n.): A sharp, shrill, disagreeable sound suddenly utered, either of the human voice or of any animal or instrument, such as is made by carriage wheels when dry, by the soles of leather shoes, or by a pipe or reed.

Scraper (n.): An instrument by which the soles of shoes are cleaned from mud and the like, by drawing them across it.

Plaid (n.): A rectangular garment or piece of cloth, usually made of the checkered material called tartan, but sometimes of plain gray, or gray with black stripes. It is worn by both sexes in Scotland.

Hobnail (n.): A short, sharp-pointed, large-headed nail, -- used in shoeing houses and for studding the soles of heavy shoes.

Blacking (n.): Any preparation for making things black; esp. one for giving a black luster to boots and shoes, or to stoves.

Cracowes (n. pl.): Long-toed boots or shoes formerly worn in many parts of Europe; -- so called from Cracow, in Poland, where they were first worn in the fourteenth century.

Shoer (n.): One who fits shoes to the feet; one who furnishes or puts on shoes; as, a shoer of horses.

Japan (v. t.): To give a glossy black to, as shoes.

School (n.): A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school.

Old (superl.): Worn out; weakened or exhausted by use; past usefulness; as, old shoes; old clothes.

Deck (v.): The upper part or top of a mansard roof or curb roof when made nearly flat.

Crampoons (n.): Iron instruments with sharp points, worn on the shoes to assist in gaining or keeping a foothold.

Prunello (n.): A smooth woolen stuff, generally black, used for making shoes; a kind of lasting; -- formerly used also for clergymen's gowns.

Shoe (n.): To furnish with a shoe or shoes; to put a shoe or shoes on; as, to shoe a horse, a sled, an anchor.

Squilgee (n.): Formerly, a small swab for drying a vessel's deck; now, a kind of scraper having a blade or edge of rubber or of leather, -- used for removing superfluous, water or other liquids, as from a vessel's deck after washing, from window panes, photographer's plates, etc.

Galloon (n.): A narrow tapelike fabric used for binding hats, shoes, etc., -- sometimes made ornamental.

Size (n.): A conventional relative measure of dimension, as for shoes, gloves, and other articles made up for sale.

Shirt (n.): A loose under-garment for the upper part of the body, made of cotton, linen, or other material; -- formerly used of the under-garment of either sex, now commonly restricted to that worn by men and boys.

Nucleus (n.): A kernel; hence, a central mass or point about which matter is gathered, or to which accretion is made; the central or material portion; -- used both literally and figuratively.

Mat (n.): A fabric of sedge, rushes, flags, husks, straw, hemp, or similar material, used for wiping and cleaning shoes at the door, for covering the floor of a hall or room, and for other purposes.

Esparto (n.): A species of Spanish grass (Macrochloa tenacissima), of which cordage, shoes, baskets, etc., are made. It is also used for making paper.

Talaria (n. pl.): Small wings or winged shoes represented as fastened to the ankles, -- chiefly used as an attribute of Mercury.

Rosette (n.): Any structure having a flowerlike form; especially, the group of five broad ambulacra on the upper side of the spatangoid and clypeastroid sea urchins. See Illust. of Spicule, and Sand dollar, under Sand.

Waterproof (n.): Cloth made waterproof, or any article made of such cloth, or of other waterproof material, as rubber; esp., an outer garment made of such material.

Poncho (n.): A kind of cloak worn by the Spanish Americans, having the form of a blanket, with a slit in the middle for the head to pass through. A kind of poncho made of rubber or painted cloth is used by the mounted troops in the United States service.

Manufacture (n.): Anything made from raw materials by the hand, by machinery, or by art, as cloths, iron utensils, shoes, machinery, saddlery, etc.

Tangram (n.): A Chinese toy made by cutting a square of thin wood, or other suitable material, into seven pieces, as shown in the cut, these pieces being capable of combination in various ways, so as to form a great number of different figures. It is now often used in primary schools as a means of instruction.

Tharos (n.): A small American butterfly (Phycoides tharos) having the upper surface of the wings variegated with orange and black, the outer margins black with small white crescents; -- called also pearl crescent.

Quarter-deck (n.): That part of the upper deck abaft the mainmast, including the poop deck when there is one.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some.

Meaning of sannies

sannies means: Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some.

Meaning of brothel creepers

brothel creepers means: Popular sort of footwear with very thick flat rubber soles that allow you to walk almost silently. Very useful for creeping up behind people to give them wedgies or cop a feel. Similar to the platform soles favoured by "Baby Spice" but worn (usu.) by males. (ed: I used to wear these in the 1960's and got nicknamed 'creeping jesus' by my mates)

Meaning of LIFTS

LIFTS means: Lifts is American slang for height−enhancing soles worn inside shoes.

Meaning of LIFTIES

LIFTIES means: Lifties is American slang for height−enhancing soles worn inside shoes.

Meaning of plimsolls

plimsolls means: n light canvas shoes with rubber soles. A rather antiquated shoe, and therefore an equally antiquated word. Your grandmother may refer to your trainers as plimsolls, but that doesn’t mean you should too.

Meaning of taps

taps means: soles of shoes

Meaning of unemployment boots

unemployment boots means: rubber boots bought when fishermen started collection unemployment insurance. They were made of green rubber, with 4 holes at the top with yellow laces

Meaning of daps

daps means: Old term for trainers. Also known as plimsoles, deck shoes etc. In school the answer to "What's the fastest thing in the world?" was "Diarrhoea with daps on!".

Meaning of pasties

pasties means: The "a" is pronounced as in "cat". Probably a comparison to the type of flat cheese 'pasty' you could buy at the bakery. These were shoes that were flat-soled and dorky looking, usually made out of soft leather. As an aside, we've just learned that in Australia "Pasties" (Pronounced as paste), is slang for a dry mouth. Usually after smoking pot! as in "I need something to drink, I've got the Pasties." This is pressumably because of the paste like consistency of saliva, when dehydrated. not sure when this started, but possibly in the 1990's.

Meaning of STINGER

STINGER means: Brakeman. Derived from initial B(ee) of Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, or perhaps from some brakemen's habit of arousing hobos by applying a brake club to the soles of their shoes

Meaning of gutties

gutties means: Noun. Rubber soled sports shoes, trainers. (Glasgow use)

Meaning of Thongs

Thongs means: Shoes/flip flops They were considered beach/around the house shoes. Now everybody weres them everywhere.

Meaning of christening

christening means: The ceremony of having people kick the crap out of your new shoes - particularly bad if Dr Marten shoes - seen as a token of hardness.

Meaning of court shoes

court shoes means: n pumps. Lightweight heeled women’s dress shoes with enclosed toes.

Meaning of biscuits

biscuits means: Dirty, worn-out shoes. You never know what that old bird is going to do next.

Meaning of batts

batts means: Pair of worn shoddy boots or shoes.

Meaning of CENTRAL HIGHLANDS

CENTRAL HIGHLANDS means: The Central Highlands, a plateau area at the southern edge of the Truong Son Mountains, was a strategically important region of South Vietnam throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Nearly one million people, primarily Montagnard tribesmen, lived in the 20,000 square miles of the Central Highlands in 1968. The region was economically known for its production of coffee, tea, and vegetables. Pg. 67

Meaning of stottie

stottie means: Noun. A flat coarse bread, made from the scraps of dough leftover in baking. [Scotland/Tyneside/Northern use]

Meaning of clipless

clipless means: adj. misleading name for a pedaland-shoe system where the clips or cleats clip onto the soles of special shoes. Called "clipless" because they replaced toe clips.

Meaning of brothel creepers

brothel creepers means: Noun. Thick rubber soled shoes, fashionable with the Teddy Boys and rockers of the 1950s, and revived in the 1980s.

Meaning of Peg

Peg means: A small, pointed piece of wood, used in fastening boards together, in attaching the soles of boots or shoes, etc.; as, a shoe peg.

Meaning of Squeak

Squeak means: A sharp, shrill, disagreeable sound suddenly utered, either of the human voice or of any animal or instrument, such as is made by carriage wheels when dry, by the soles of leather shoes, or by a pipe or reed.

Meaning of Scraper

Scraper means: An instrument by which the soles of shoes are cleaned from mud and the like, by drawing them across it.

Meaning of Plaid

Plaid means: A rectangular garment or piece of cloth, usually made of the checkered material called tartan, but sometimes of plain gray, or gray with black stripes. It is worn by both sexes in Scotland.

Meaning of Hobnail

Hobnail means: A short, sharp-pointed, large-headed nail, -- used in shoeing houses and for studding the soles of heavy shoes.

Meaning of Blacking

Blacking means: Any preparation for making things black; esp. one for giving a black luster to boots and shoes, or to stoves.

Meaning of Cracowes

Cracowes means: Long-toed boots or shoes formerly worn in many parts of Europe; -- so called from Cracow, in Poland, where they were first worn in the fourteenth century.

Meaning of Shoer

Shoer means: One who fits shoes to the feet; one who furnishes or puts on shoes; as, a shoer of horses.

Meaning of Japan

Japan means: To give a glossy black to, as shoes.

Meaning of School

School means: A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school.

Meaning of Old

Old means: Worn out; weakened or exhausted by use; past usefulness; as, old shoes; old clothes.

Meaning of Deck

Deck means: The upper part or top of a mansard roof or curb roof when made nearly flat.

Meaning of Crampoons

Crampoons means: Iron instruments with sharp points, worn on the shoes to assist in gaining or keeping a foothold.

Meaning of Prunello

Prunello means: A smooth woolen stuff, generally black, used for making shoes; a kind of lasting; -- formerly used also for clergymen's gowns.

Meaning of Shoe

Shoe means: To furnish with a shoe or shoes; to put a shoe or shoes on; as, to shoe a horse, a sled, an anchor.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Deprecatingly

Deprecatingly means: In a deprecating manner.

Meaning of Proliferous

Proliferous means: Producing young by budding.

Meaning of Pyrexia

Pyrexia means: The febrile condition.

Meaning of Underneath

Underneath means: Beneath; below; in a lower place; under; as, a channel underneath the soil.

Meaning of Vital

Vital means: Belonging or relating to life, either animal or vegetable; as, vital energies; vital functions; vital actions.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of SHERMAN

SHERMAN means: Sherman (shortened from Sherman tank) is British rhyming slang for mastrubate.

Meaning of fi'n

fi'n means: v. (derived from "fixin") Getting ready to do something.  "I'm fi'n to tell you what's up wit Sheila and Snoopy." 

Meaning of Hot one

Hot one means: Bowl of chili soup

Meaning of Longers And Lingers

Longers And Lingers means: Fingers

Meaning of Dynamite

Dynamite means: Whiskey.

Tags: Slang Meaning of Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some.. The slang definition of Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some.? Please, add a definition of Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some. if you did not find one from a search of Sand shoes worn for P.E. in primary school. They were made of black material with small upper elasticated bit, and had flat rubber soles; no laces! EVERYBODY had them in 1970s central Scotland! An early form of 'trainer' also known as deck shoes by some..

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