Slang meaning of shit kickers

shit kickers means: Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere.

What is the slang meaning/definition of shit kickers ?

shit kickers means: Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere.

Slang definition of shit kickers

shit kickers means: Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere.

More meanings / definitions of Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere. or words, sentences containing Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere.?

Spur (n.): A spiked iron worn by seamen upon the bottom of the boot, to enable them to stand upon the carcass of a whale, to strip off the blubber.

Surcoat (n.): A coat worn over the other garments; especially, the long and flowing garment of knights, worn over the armor, and frequently emblazoned with the arms of the wearer.

Boot (v. i.): To boot one's self; to put on one's boots.

Boot (v. t.): To put boots on, esp. for riding.

Tabard (n.): A sort of tunic or mantle formerly worn for protection from the weather. When worn over the armor it was commonly emblazoned with the arms of the wearer, and from this the name was given to the garment adopted for heralds.

Kick (n.): A blow with the foot or feet; a striking or thrust with the foot.

Boot (v. t.): To profit; to advantage; to avail; -- generally followed by it; as, what boots it?

Cracowes (n. pl.): Long-toed boots or shoes formerly worn in many parts of Europe; -- so called from Cracow, in Poland, where they were first worn in the fourteenth century.

Clamper (n.): An instrument of iron, with sharp prongs, attached to a boot or shoe to enable the wearer to walk securely upon ice; a creeper.

Genuine (a.): Belonging to, or proceeding from, the original stock; native; hence, not counterfeit, spurious, false, or adulterated; authentic; real; natural; true; pure; as, a genuine text; a genuine production; genuine materials.

Foot (v. t.): To kick with the foot; to spurn.

Steely (a.): Resembling steel; hard; firm; having the color of steel.

Top-boots (n. pl.): High boots, having generally a band of some kind of light-colored leather around the upper part of the leg; riding boots.

It (pron.): As a demonstrative, especially at the beginning of a sentence, pointing to that which is about to be stated, named, or mentioned, or referring to that which apparent or well known; as, I saw it was John.

Footing (n.): Ground for the foot; place for the foot to rest on; firm foundation to stand on.

Walk (v. i.): To move along on foot; to advance by steps; to go on at a moderate pace; specifically, of two-legged creatures, to proceed at a slower or faster rate, but without running, or lifting one foot entirely before the other touches the ground.

Spurn (n.): A kick; a blow with the foot.

Experiment (v. t.): To make experiment; to operate by test or trial; -- often with on, upon, or in, referring to the subject of an experiment; with, referring to the instrument; and by, referring to the means; as, to experiment upon electricity; he experimented in plowing with ponies, or by steam power.

Kick (v. i.): To thrust out the foot or feet with violence; to strike out with the foot or feet, as in defense or in bad temper; esp., to strike backward, as a horse does, or to have a habit of doing so. Hence, figuratively: To show ugly resistance, opposition, or hostility; to spurn.

Charm (n.): Anything worn for its supposed efficacy to the wearer in averting ill or securing good fortune.

Birrus (n.): A coarse kind of thick woolen cloth, worn by the poor in the Middle Ages; also, a woolen cap or hood worn over the shoulders or over the head.

Spurn (v. t.): To drive back or away, as with the foot; to kick.

Steel (n.): To cover, as an electrotype plate, with a thin layer of iron by electrolysis. The iron thus deposited is very hard, like steel.

Halt (v. i.): To stand in doubt whether to proceed, or what to do; to hesitate; to be uncertain.

Progne (n.): A genus of swallows including the purple martin. See Martin.

Wearer (n.): One who wears or carries as appendant to the body; as, the wearer of a cloak, a sword, a crown, a shackle, etc.

Boothose (n.): Hose made to be worn with boots, as by travelers on horseback.

Sashoon (n.): A kind of pad worn on the leg under the boot.

Toe (n.): Anything, or any part, corresponding to the toe of the foot; as, the toe of a boot; the toe of a skate.

Frame (n.): A stand to support the type cases for use by the compositor.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere.

Meaning of shit kickers

shit kickers means: Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere.

Meaning of bovver-boots

bovver-boots means: Big boots worn by punks and hard-cases.. most often Dr Martens.

Meaning of boot boys

boot boys means: Tough guy, 'Hard case'. Orginating from the Skin/Suedehead era. The name was orginally another name for a skinhead who wore Doc Marten boots but lasted into the mid to late 70's. For instance a group of young lads who wanted to sound or act tough might call themselves 'The Victoria Park Boot Boys', The book 'Boot boys' by Richard Allen was a big seller in the early 70's, the story of an ex skinhead who still enjoys a spot of aggro.

Meaning of tough shit!

tough shit! means: Exclam. Hard luck! Often expressed with irony. Cf. 'hard-shit'.

Meaning of TOUGH SHIT

TOUGH SHIT means: Tough shit is slang for hard luck.

Meaning of tough titty!

tough titty! means: Exclam. Hard luck! Cf. 'tough shit'.

Meaning of welly

welly means: Verb. To kick forcefully. Noun. 1. A hard kick. 2. Acceleration. E.g."Quick! Turn left here and give it some welly." 3. A wellington boot. Also spelt wellie. {Informal}

Meaning of pig-iron Bob

pig-iron Bob means: nickname for Autralia's Prime Minister,Bob Menzies during the second world war - so named for selling iron to the Japanese only to have it converted to steel against his own country

Meaning of pig-iron Bob

pig-iron Bob means: nickname for Autralia's Prime Minister,Bob Menzies during the second world war - so named for selling iron to the Japanese only to have it converted to steel against his own country

Meaning of pig-iron Bob

pig-iron Bob means: nickname for Autralia's Prime Minister,Bob Menzies during the second world war - so named for selling iron to the Japanese only to have it converted to steel against his own country

Meaning of Bootlip

Bootlip means: During the Industrial boom of the auto industry and OSHA'a requirement of safety precautions, workers were required to wear steel-toed boots. Common steel-toed boots are black in color and have large, bulky toes - referencing the size of black's lips.

Meaning of PUT THE BOOT IN

PUT THE BOOT IN means: Put the boot in is slang for to kick a person, especially when he is already down. Put the boot in is slang for to harass someone or aggravate a problem.Put the boot in is slang for to finish off. something with unnecessary brutality.

Meaning of hard

hard means: adj tough. A “hard man” is a tough guy, someone who won’t take any flack. This amuses Americans, for obvious reasons.

Meaning of T.S.

T.S. means: T.S. is American military slang for tough shit; tough situation; tough stuff; typescript.

Meaning of BOVVER BOOTS

BOVVER BOOTS means: Bovver boots is British slang for heavy boots worn by some teenage youths in Britain, and used in gang fights.

Meaning of ip dip dog shit

ip dip dog shit means: When working out who was "it" for a game, you'd all put your left foot in a circle, and then one of you would say... Ip dip dog shit You are not on it. ... whilst touching each foot in turn. Was an accepted method of choosing who was it . Sophie has expanded on that with the following: For the Ip Dip... there is also a version that goes Ip dip Sky Blue Granny sittin' on the loo Drop a bomb Sing a song Out goes you.

Meaning of KICK

KICK means: Kick is slang for to give up. Usually referring to the giving up of addictive drugs. Kick was oldBritish slang for sixpence.

Meaning of TOUGH

TOUGH means: Tough is slang for stand firm, hold out against. Tough is British slang for a thug.

Meaning of Wannabe

Wannabe means: (WAN-a-bee) n., adj., Someone who “wants to be” something he/she isn’t, such as an athlete, a strong person, a leader.  “That Eddie is such a wannabe.”  “Yeah, he’s a wannabe rock star.”  [Etym., African American]

Meaning of tin-bum Bob

tin-bum Bob means: nickname for Australian Prime Minister Bob Hawke - so named for his Cornish tin miner ancestors and to match an old enemy's nickname, see "pig-iron Bob" - tin-bum used to refer to someone who was tight with their money

Meaning of Spur

Spur means: A spiked iron worn by seamen upon the bottom of the boot, to enable them to stand upon the carcass of a whale, to strip off the blubber.

Meaning of Surcoat

Surcoat means: A coat worn over the other garments; especially, the long and flowing garment of knights, worn over the armor, and frequently emblazoned with the arms of the wearer.

Meaning of Boot

Boot means: To boot one's self; to put on one's boots.

Meaning of Boot

Boot means: To put boots on, esp. for riding.

Meaning of Tabard

Tabard means: A sort of tunic or mantle formerly worn for protection from the weather. When worn over the armor it was commonly emblazoned with the arms of the wearer, and from this the name was given to the garment adopted for heralds.

Meaning of Kick

Kick means: A blow with the foot or feet; a striking or thrust with the foot.

Meaning of Boot

Boot means: To profit; to advantage; to avail; -- generally followed by it; as, what boots it?

Meaning of Cracowes

Cracowes means: Long-toed boots or shoes formerly worn in many parts of Europe; -- so called from Cracow, in Poland, where they were first worn in the fourteenth century.

Meaning of Clamper

Clamper means: An instrument of iron, with sharp prongs, attached to a boot or shoe to enable the wearer to walk securely upon ice; a creeper.

Meaning of Genuine

Genuine means: Belonging to, or proceeding from, the original stock; native; hence, not counterfeit, spurious, false, or adulterated; authentic; real; natural; true; pure; as, a genuine text; a genuine production; genuine materials.

Meaning of Foot

Foot means: To kick with the foot; to spurn.

Meaning of Steely

Steely means: Resembling steel; hard; firm; having the color of steel.

Meaning of Top-boots

Top-boots means: High boots, having generally a band of some kind of light-colored leather around the upper part of the leg; riding boots.

Meaning of It

It means: As a demonstrative, especially at the beginning of a sentence, pointing to that which is about to be stated, named, or mentioned, or referring to that which apparent or well known; as, I saw it was John.

Meaning of Footing

Footing means: Ground for the foot; place for the foot to rest on; firm foundation to stand on.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Boxkeeper

Boxkeeper means: An attendant at a theater who has charge of the boxes.

Meaning of Oeiliad

Oeiliad means: Alt. of Oeillade

Meaning of Perciformes

Perciformes means: An extensive tribe or suborder of fishes, including the true perches (Percidae); the pondfishes (Centrarchidae); the sciaenoids (Sciaenidae); the sparoids (Sparidae); the serranoids (Serranidae), and some other related families.

Meaning of Phitoness

Phitoness means: Pythoness; witch.

Meaning of Royalty

Royalty means: Hence (Com.), a duty paid by a manufacturer to the owner of a patent or a copyright at a certain rate for each article manufactured; or, a percentage paid to the owner of an article by one who hires the use of it.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of SLOOP OF WAR

SLOOP OF WAR means: Sloop of war is London Cockney rhyming slang for a whore.

Meaning of Taking the biscuit

Taking the biscuit means: If something really takes the biscuit, it means it out-does everything else and cannot be bettered. Some places in America they said takes the cake.

Meaning of hooch

hooch means: alcohol

Tags: Slang Meaning of Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere.. The slang definition of Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere.? Please, add a definition of Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere. if you did not find one from a search of Boots. Usually referring to Doc Martin's with steel toe-caps, but equally appropriate to any really tough boot as worn by genuine hard-cases, or wannabe ones. So named because, they, propelled by the wearer's foot, proceed to kick the shit out of anyone foolish enough to stand in their way. This nickname has, as far as I know, been going for ages, everywhere..

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