Slang meaning of spuggie

spuggie means: A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents.

What is the slang meaning/definition of spuggie ?

spuggie means: A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents.

Slang definition of spuggie

spuggie means: A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents.

spuggie:

More meanings / definitions of A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents. or words, sentences containing A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents.?

Geordie (n.): A name given by miners to George Stephenson's safety lamp.

Sparrow (n.): One of many species of small singing birds of the family Fringilligae, having conical bills, and feeding chiefly on seeds. Many sparrows are called also finches, and buntings. The common sparrow, or house sparrow, of Europe (Passer domesticus) is noted for its familiarity, its voracity, its attachment to its young, and its fecundity. See House sparrow, under House.

Peabody bird (): An American sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) having a conspicuous white throat. The name is imitative of its note. Called also White-throated sparrow.

Chippy (n.): A small American sparrow (Spizella socialis), very common near dwelling; -- also called chipping bird and chipping sparrow, from its simple note.

Sowens (n. pl.): A nutritious article of food, much used in Scotland, made from the husk of the oat by a process not unlike that by which common starch is made; -- called flummery in England.

Shibboleth (n.): A word which was made the criterion by which to distinguish the Ephraimites from the Gileadites. The Ephraimites, not being able to pronounce sh, called the word sibboleth. See Judges xii.

Southdown (a.): Of or pertaining to the South Downs, a range of pasture hills south of the Thames, in England.

Mark (n.): A character or device put on an article of merchandise by the maker to show by whom it was made; a trade-mark.

Inspeximus (n.): The first word of ancient charters in England, confirming a grant made by a former king; hence, a royal grant.

South (a.): Lying toward the south; situated at the south, or in a southern direction from the point of observation or reckoning; proceeding toward the south, or coming from the south; blowing from the south; southern; as, the south pole.

Canaster (n.): A kind of tobacco for smoking, made of the dried leaves, coarsely broken; -- so called from the rush baskets in which it is packed in South America.

Accent (n.): A mark or character used in writing, and serving to regulate the pronunciation; esp.: (a) a mark to indicate the nature and place of the spoken accent; (b) a mark to indicate the quality of sound of the vowel marked; as, the French accents.

Mosstrooper (n.): One of a class of marauders or bandits that formerly infested the border country between England and Scotland; -- so called in allusion to the mossy or boggy character of much of the border country.

Preposition (n.): A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Philip (n.): The house sparrow. Called also phip.

Bocking (n.): A coarse woolen fabric, used for floor cloths, to cover carpets, etc.; -- so called from the town of Bocking, in England, where it was first made.

Sparrow (n.): Any one of several small singing birds somewhat resembling the true sparrows in form or habits, as the European hedge sparrow. See under Hedge.

Canterbury (n.): A city in England, giving its name various articles. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury (primate of all England), and contains the shrine of Thomas a Becket, to which pilgrimages were formerly made.

Hieroglyphic (a.): A sacred character; a character in picture writing, as of the ancient Egyptians, Mexicans, etc. Specifically, in the plural, the picture writing of the ancient Egyptian priests. It is made up of three, or, as some say, four classes of characters: first, the hieroglyphic proper, or figurative, in which the representation of the object conveys the idea of the object itself; second, the ideographic, consisting of symbols representing ideas, not sounds, as an ostrich feather is a symbol of truth; third, the phonetic, consisting of symbols employed as syllables of a word, or as letters of the alphabet, having a certain sound, as a hawk represented the vowel a.

Wassail (n.): The liquor used for a wassail; esp., a beverage formerly much used in England at Christmas and other festivals, made of ale (or wine) flavored with spices, sugar, toast, roasted apples, etc.; -- called also lamb's wool.

Honiton lace (): A kind of pillow lace, remarkable for the beauty of its figures; -- so called because chiefly made in Honiton, England.

Rupert's drop (): A kind of glass drop with a long tail, made by dropping melted glass into water. It is remarkable for bursting into fragments when the surface is scratched or the tail broken; -- so called from Prince Rupert, nephew of Charles I., by whom they were first brought to England. Called also Rupert's ball, and glass tear.

Burion (n.): The red-breasted house sparrow of California (Carpodacus frontalis); -- called also crimson-fronted bullfinch.

Titling (n.): The hedge sparrow; -- called also titlene. Its nest often chosen by the cuckoo as a place for depositing its own eggs.

Apostrophe (n.): The contraction of a word by the omission of a letter or letters, which omission is marked by the character ['] placed where the letter or letters would have been; as, call'd for called.

Call (v. t.): To show or disclose the class, character, or nationality of.

Ticket (v.): A label to show the character or price of goods.

Example (n.): One or a portion taken to show the character or quality of the whole; a sample; a specimen.

Grison (n.): A South American animal of the family Mustelidae (Galictis vittata). It is about two feet long, exclusive of the tail. Its under parts are black. Also called South American glutton.

Show (v. t.): To exhibit or present to view; to place in sight; to display; -- the thing exhibited being the object, and often with an indirect object denoting the person or thing seeing or beholding; as, to show a house; show your colors; shopkeepers show customers goods (show goods to customers).

Like to add another meaning or definition of A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents.

Meaning of spuggie

spuggie means: A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents.

Meaning of GEORDIE

GEORDIE means: Geordie is British slang for someone from Newcastle or Tyneside in north−east England.

Meaning of Toon Army

Toon Army means: Noun. Collectively the supporters of Newcastle United Football Club. Toon meaning town in the Geordie dalect. See 'Geordie'.

Meaning of Geordie

Geordie means: n person from Newcastle, or thereabouts.

Meaning of pallatic

pallatic means: Geordie corruption of 'paralytic', i.e. drunk.

Meaning of hinny

hinny means: Noun. An affectionate form of address. 'Geordie' pronunciation of honey. [Newcastle use]

Meaning of singled out

singled out means: No, not an MTV game show... (Yes a couple of programs even made it to England!) When the bunch has become a single pace line.

Meaning of biffa

biffa means: Pug-ugly. Biffo the Bear was a main character in the Dandy comic, but in VIZ comic in the 1980s there was a character called Biffa Bacon. His family were all particularly ugly. Biffo was actually quite reasonable looking for a cartoon bear! Biffa has also been used in HM Armed Forces for many years. Note: We've been told that in London the more common useage of biffa now, is to describe someone who eats a lot. It draws relevence from the popular brand of dumpster made by a company called 'Biffa'. (ed: would appreciate some feedback on this. I don't remember seeing any such thing when I was last there)

Meaning of shedoeg

shedoeg means: Nasty female, but most often applied literally to a bitch. The "o" in "dog" was a weird vowel like the "ir" in "bird". (ed: you really have to *hear* Geordie spoken to get the full benefit of it)

Meaning of A.C.E.

A.C.E. means: Used to alienate kids who said "ace". People who originally used "ace" to mean "good" suddenly found that the word had been redefined to mean "crap"., This was used in my part of Sheffield, South Yorkshire during the very early 90s and resulted in the total removal of the word "ace" from the school vocabulary because everyone was confused as to the meaning.

Meaning of muckle

muckle means: In standard Scottish and Geordie dialect, this meant "big", but it was corrupted to take on an adjectival meaning of "really" or "very "; for example "That's muckle ex!"

Meaning of swivel on

swivel on means: A Geordie putdown, short for 'Swivel on this!' (i.e. my middle finger)

Meaning of Geordie

Geordie means: Noun. A person from Tyneside or Newcastle, and consequently the dialect of such a person.

Meaning of lonnen

lonnen means: Originally from Scots but also in Geordie. Possibly derived from 'loanin' which might have had to do with an old system for loaning plots of land, or perhaps "a sheltered place where cows were gathered for milking". I think we need some further input on this before we can be definitive.. To the contributor it meant a shortcut that was usually grassy and covered in dog poo, often an old railway line or grassy lane that you'd maybe use as a shortcut to get to school. (ed: on the other hand... Burno tells us that in Georgie, 'Lonnen' just means a lane. Seems there's a road called 'Lonnen' in a town local to him... but he didn't say which one)

Meaning of donnert

donnert means: Stupid, thick. Scots/Geordie. 'He's donnert him man.'.

Meaning of lowp

lowp means: To jump. If the football went over the wall into the field you had to find someone tall who could 'lowp' ower the fence to retrieve it. Geordie contribution, but poss. also Scots.

Meaning of Mickey Mouse

Mickey Mouse means: Adj. 1. Stupid looking, comical. E.g."I'm not wearing that in public! It's a Mickey Mouse hat." 2. Second rate, of poor quality, cheaply made.Noun. A person from Liverpool. Rhyming slang on 'scouse'. Also Mickey Mouser rhyming on 'scouser'. Cf. 'scouse' and 'scouser'.

Meaning of Jim Crow

Jim Crow means: Used a lot during the Civil War. He was a stereotypical minstrel show character, history described here. Also used to describe segregationist laws in the south, but I recently read about a bus driver who was fired for using the term to describe a black person.

Meaning of lurgi, lurgy

lurgi, lurgy means: Imaginary sickness that 1) girls had and you contracted by kissing them. 2) you had as a matter of course from being smelly or dirty or not like the other kids. The imaginary disease of the lurgi could also be spontaneously developed by someone in order to start a game whereby the afflicted child had to pass it on to someone else by touch. Other children could protect themselves by calling "injected!" and miming using a syringe in their arm. The word originates from an episode of the British 50s radio programme The Goon Show. The episode was called "Lurgi Strikes Britain", telling the story of an epidemic of the fictitious disease - and 45 years later the word is used universally across British schools by children who have never heard of the Goons.

Meaning of Arr!( Arrrh!, Arrgh!)

Arr!( Arrrh!, Arrgh!) means: Aye or yes. A word made famous by Robert Newton in the 1950 production of Treasure Island. The word can be used as a verbal pause or to show excitement. (Think of it as universal "you know" or "alright!" in pirate lingo). This one is pure Hollywood.

Meaning of Geordie

Geordie means: A name given by miners to George Stephenson's safety lamp.

Meaning of Sparrow

Sparrow means: One of many species of small singing birds of the family Fringilligae, having conical bills, and feeding chiefly on seeds. Many sparrows are called also finches, and buntings. The common sparrow, or house sparrow, of Europe (Passer domesticus) is noted for its familiarity, its voracity, its attachment to its young, and its fecundity. See House sparrow, under House.

Meaning of Peabody bird

Peabody bird means: An American sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) having a conspicuous white throat. The name is imitative of its note. Called also White-throated sparrow.

Meaning of Chippy

Chippy means: A small American sparrow (Spizella socialis), very common near dwelling; -- also called chipping bird and chipping sparrow, from its simple note.

Meaning of Sowens

Sowens means: A nutritious article of food, much used in Scotland, made from the husk of the oat by a process not unlike that by which common starch is made; -- called flummery in England.

Meaning of Shibboleth

Shibboleth means: A word which was made the criterion by which to distinguish the Ephraimites from the Gileadites. The Ephraimites, not being able to pronounce sh, called the word sibboleth. See Judges xii.

Meaning of Southdown

Southdown means: Of or pertaining to the South Downs, a range of pasture hills south of the Thames, in England.

Meaning of Mark

Mark means: A character or device put on an article of merchandise by the maker to show by whom it was made; a trade-mark.

Meaning of Inspeximus

Inspeximus means: The first word of ancient charters in England, confirming a grant made by a former king; hence, a royal grant.

Meaning of South

South means: Lying toward the south; situated at the south, or in a southern direction from the point of observation or reckoning; proceeding toward the south, or coming from the south; blowing from the south; southern; as, the south pole.

Meaning of Canaster

Canaster means: A kind of tobacco for smoking, made of the dried leaves, coarsely broken; -- so called from the rush baskets in which it is packed in South America.

Meaning of Accent

Accent means: A mark or character used in writing, and serving to regulate the pronunciation; esp.: (a) a mark to indicate the nature and place of the spoken accent; (b) a mark to indicate the quality of sound of the vowel marked; as, the French accents.

Meaning of Mosstrooper

Mosstrooper means: One of a class of marauders or bandits that formerly infested the border country between England and Scotland; -- so called in allusion to the mossy or boggy character of much of the border country.

Meaning of Preposition

Preposition means: A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Meaning of Philip

Philip means: The house sparrow. Called also phip.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Gather

Gather means: A plait or fold in cloth, made by drawing a thread through it; a pucker.

Meaning of Lease

Lease means: To hold under a lease; to take lease of; as, a tenant leases his land from the owner.

Meaning of Pruning

Pruning means: The act of trimming, or removing what is superfluous.

Meaning of Resistive

Resistive means: Serving to resist.

Meaning of Slowh

Slowh means: imp. of Slee,to slay.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of HILLMAN HUNTER

HILLMAN HUNTER means: Hillman Hunter is London Cockney rhyming slang for a customer (punter).

Meaning of dannies

dannies means: Noun. Hands. [South Yorkshire use]

Meaning of Bung

Bung means: - To bung something means to throw it. For example a street trader might bung something in for free if you pay cash right now! Or you could say "bung my car keys over, mate".

Meaning of HD

HD means: Hold

Meaning of cak, cack, cacky, kak

cak, cack, cacky, kak means: Excrement, e.g. "cack face" Also "He got kakked on for shouting in the passage.",Variations are very common all over the world. Raises difficult questions of whether words used from another language count as slang. For example, this is a direct mutated transposition from the Afrikaans "kak" for "shit" - which of course raises the question of the origin of the colour 'khaki'!

Tags: Slang Meaning of A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents.. The slang definition of A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents.? Please, add a definition of A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents. if you did not find one from a search of A sparrow. Incidentally there was a character on a Geordie-made kids’ TV show in the UK called Spuggie, so kids from the South of England would always use the word to take the mickey out of Geordie accents..

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