Slang meaning of Wanker's Cramp

Wanker's Cramp means: A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively.

What is the slang meaning/definition of Wanker's Cramp ?

Wanker's Cramp means: A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively.

Slang definition of Wanker's Cramp

Wanker's Cramp means: A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively.

More meanings / definitions of A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively. or words, sentences containing A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively.?

Cramp (v. t.): To form on a cramp; as, to cramp boot legs.

Joke (v. i.): To do something for sport, or as a joke; to be merry in words or actions; to jest.

Crampet (n.): A cramp iron or cramp ring; a chape, as of a scabbard.

Joke (v. t.): To make merry with; to make jokes upon; to rally; to banter; as, to joke a comrade.

Cramp (n.): A device, usually of iron bent at the ends, used to hold together blocks of stone, timbers, etc.; a cramp iron.

Cramp (v. t.): To fasten or hold with, or as with, a cramp.

Cramp iron (): See Cramp, n., 2.

Cramp (v. t.): To afflict with cramp.

Nay (adv.): No; -- a negative answer to a question asked, or a request made, now superseded by no. See Yes.

Answer (n.): To speak in defense against; to reply to in defense; as, to answer a charge; to answer an accusation.

Answer (n.): A solution, the result of a mathematical operation; as, the answer to a problem.

Answer (v. i.): To render account, or to be responsible; to be accountable; to make amends; as, the man must answer to his employer for the money intrusted to his care.

Answer (v. i.): To be or act as an equivalent, or as adequate or sufficient; as, a very few will answer.

Shall (v. i. & auxiliary.): As an auxiliary, shall indicates a duty or necessity whose obligation is derived from the person speaking; as, you shall go; he shall go; that is, I order or promise your going. It thus ordinarily expresses, in the second and third persons, a command, a threat, or a promise. If the auxillary be emphasized, the command is made more imperative, the promise or that more positive and sure. It is also employed in the language of prophecy; as, "the day shall come when . . . , " since a promise or threat and an authoritative prophecy nearly coincide in significance. In shall with the first person, the necessity of the action is sometimes implied as residing elsewhere than in the speaker; as, I shall suffer; we shall see; and there is always a less distinct and positive assertion of his volition than is indicated by will. "I shall go" implies nearly a simple futurity; more exactly, a foretelling or an expectation of my going, in which, naturally enough, a certain degree of plan or intention may be included; emphasize the shall, and the event is described as certain to occur, and the expression approximates in meaning to our emphatic "I will go." In a question, the relation of speaker and source of obligation is of course transferred to the person addressed; as, "Shall you go?" (answer, "I shall go"); "Shall he go?" i. e., "Do you require or promise his going?" (answer, "He shall go".) The same relation is transferred to either second or third person in such phrases as "You say, or think, you shall go;" "He says, or thinks, he shall go." After a conditional conjunction (as if, whether) shall is used in all persons to express futurity simply; as, if I, you, or he shall say they are right. Should is everywhere used in the same connection and the same senses as shall, as its imperfect. It also expresses duty or moral obligation; as, he should do it whether he will or not. In the early English, and hence in our English Bible, shall is the auxiliary mainly used, in all the persons, to express simple futurity. (Cf. Will, v. t.) Shall may be used elliptically; thus, with an adverb or other word expressive of motion go may be omitted.

Negative (a.): Denying; implying, containing, or asserting denial, negation or refusal; returning the answer no to an inquiry or request; refusing assent; as, a negative answer; a negative opinion; -- opposed to affirmative.

Joked (imp. & p. p.): of Joke

Joking (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Joke

Chestnut (n.): An old joke or story.

Joke (n.): Something not said seriously, or not actually meant; something done in sport.

Dor (n.): A trick, joke, or deception.

Dogtie (n.): A cramp.

Cramped (imp. & p. p.): of Cramp

Cramping (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Cramp

Plea (n.): That which is alleged by a party in support of his cause; in a stricter sense, an allegation of fact in a cause, as distinguished from a demurrer; in a still more limited sense, and in modern practice, the defendant's answer to the plaintiff's declaration and demand. That which the plaintiff alleges in his declaration is answered and repelled or justified by the defendant's plea. In chancery practice, a plea is a special answer showing or relying upon one or more things as a cause why the suit should be either dismissed, delayed, or barred. In criminal practice, the plea is the defendant's formal answer to the indictment or information presented against him.

Rub (n.): Something grating to the feelings; sarcasm; joke; as, a hard rub.

Crampy (): Affected with cramp.

Cramp (v. t.): to bind together; to unite.

Cramp (n.): Knotty; difficult.

Take (v. t.): To bear without ill humor or resentment; to submit to; to tolerate; to endure; as, to take a joke; he will take an affront from no man.

Reply (v. i.): That which is said, written, or done in answer to what is said, written, or done by another; an answer; a response.

Like to add another meaning or definition of A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively.

Meaning of Wanker's Cramp

Wanker's Cramp means: A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively.

Meaning of CRAMP

CRAMP means: Cramp is Black American slang for an unpleasant, unpopular woman. Cramp is American slang for to annoy.Cramp is American slang for to execute, to kill.

Meaning of get it

get it means: To come to understand, catch on. I told her the joke twice but she just didn't get it.

Meaning of comprendre la plaisanterie

comprendre la plaisanterie means: be able to take a joke; be a good sport (lit.: understand the joke)

Meaning of wagner

wagner means: Used to disguise the word wanker. In this way, you could call someone a wagner in front of a teacher and they couldn't do you, when really you meant wanker. This word is used in schools now. It is mostly used when in class near a teacher or figure of authority.

Meaning of Wanker

Wanker means: a penis. ex. Ya bloody wanker or My wanker is big

Meaning of budget

budget means: Used to describe a situation, an object, a person, or a place that is rubbish/disappointing, or basically shit! For example "This place is Budget!" or "You're so budget!". Basically a derogatory term implying the person is 'cheap rubbish', or hasn't a clue about the truth of an issue. For example if you are telling a joke and the other person doesn't understand the joke, the that person is "Budget" or if a group of friends are watching a film and one person doesn't find it funny, when everyone else does, then that person is "budget".

Meaning of WANKER

WANKER means: Wanker is British slang for a masturbator.Wanker is British slang for a contemptible person.

Meaning of wanker

wanker means: a fairly stupid male ‘What a wanker!’

Meaning of Wanker

Wanker means: - This is a derogatory term used to describe someone who is a bit of a jerk. It actually means someone who masturbates and also has a hand signal that can be done with one hand at people that cannot see you shouting "wanker" at them. This is particularly useful when driving.

Meaning of Wanker

Wanker means: This is a derogatory term used to describe someone who is a bit of a jerk. It actually means someone who masturbates and also has a hand signal that can be done with one hand at people that cannot see you shouting "wanker" at them. This is particularly useful when driving.

Meaning of wanker

wanker means: A penis or someone who masturbates. "He's a wanker".

Meaning of WIND−WANKER

WIND−WANKER means: Wind−wanker is British surfing slang for a wind surfer.

Meaning of No joke!

No joke! means: An interjection of dismissal. The vote was along party lines? No joke!.

Meaning of No joke!

No joke! means: An interjection of emphasis. The vote was along party lines? No joke!.

Meaning of No joke!

No joke! means: An interjection of emphasis. No joke! Ronnie really did let the air out of the tires of the squad car.

Meaning of cramp-and-go-slow

cramp-and-go-slow means: Campagnolo.

Meaning of GOOD ANSWER

GOOD ANSWER means: Good answer is American slang for that's correct.

Meaning of lick a dick a day

lick a dick a day means: From a 6 year old (Charlie): Question: do you lick a dick a day? Answer - yes: OK Answer - no: you wet yourself. (ed: no - I have no idea what it means either)

Meaning of decir en broma

decir en broma means: kid; joke; tease. (lit.: to say (as a) joke)

Meaning of Cramp

Cramp means: To form on a cramp; as, to cramp boot legs.

Meaning of Joke

Joke means: To do something for sport, or as a joke; to be merry in words or actions; to jest.

Meaning of Crampet

Crampet means: A cramp iron or cramp ring; a chape, as of a scabbard.

Meaning of Joke

Joke means: To make merry with; to make jokes upon; to rally; to banter; as, to joke a comrade.

Meaning of Cramp

Cramp means: A device, usually of iron bent at the ends, used to hold together blocks of stone, timbers, etc.; a cramp iron.

Meaning of Cramp

Cramp means: To fasten or hold with, or as with, a cramp.

Meaning of Cramp iron

Cramp iron means: See Cramp, n., 2.

Meaning of Cramp

Cramp means: To afflict with cramp.

Meaning of Nay

Nay means: No; -- a negative answer to a question asked, or a request made, now superseded by no. See Yes.

Meaning of Answer

Answer means: To speak in defense against; to reply to in defense; as, to answer a charge; to answer an accusation.

Meaning of Answer

Answer means: A solution, the result of a mathematical operation; as, the answer to a problem.

Meaning of Answer

Answer means: To render account, or to be responsible; to be accountable; to make amends; as, the man must answer to his employer for the money intrusted to his care.

Meaning of Answer

Answer means: To be or act as an equivalent, or as adequate or sufficient; as, a very few will answer.

Meaning of Shall

Shall means: As an auxiliary, shall indicates a duty or necessity whose obligation is derived from the person speaking; as, you shall go; he shall go; that is, I order or promise your going. It thus ordinarily expresses, in the second and third persons, a command, a threat, or a promise. If the auxillary be emphasized, the command is made more imperative, the promise or that more positive and sure. It is also employed in the language of prophecy; as, "the day shall come when . . . , " since a promise or threat and an authoritative prophecy nearly coincide in significance. In shall with the first person, the necessity of the action is sometimes implied as residing elsewhere than in the speaker; as, I shall suffer; we shall see; and there is always a less distinct and positive assertion of his volition than is indicated by will. "I shall go" implies nearly a simple futurity; more exactly, a foretelling or an expectation of my going, in which, naturally enough, a certain degree of plan or intention may be included; emphasize the shall, and the event is described as certain to occur, and the expression approximates in meaning to our emphatic "I will go." In a question, the relation of speaker and source of obligation is of course transferred to the person addressed; as, "Shall you go?" (answer, "I shall go"); "Shall he go?" i. e., "Do you require or promise his going?" (answer, "He shall go".) The same relation is transferred to either second or third person in such phrases as "You say, or think, you shall go;" "He says, or thinks, he shall go." After a conditional conjunction (as if, whether) shall is used in all persons to express futurity simply; as, if I, you, or he shall say they are right. Should is everywhere used in the same connection and the same senses as shall, as its imperfect. It also expresses duty or moral obligation; as, he should do it whether he will or not. In the early English, and hence in our English Bible, shall is the auxiliary mainly used, in all the persons, to express simple futurity. (Cf. Will, v. t.) Shall may be used elliptically; thus, with an adverb or other word expressive of motion go may be omitted.

Meaning of Negative

Negative means: Denying; implying, containing, or asserting denial, negation or refusal; returning the answer no to an inquiry or request; refusing assent; as, a negative answer; a negative opinion; -- opposed to affirmative.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Envy

Envy means: To show malice or ill will; to rail.

Meaning of Hardship

Hardship means: That which is hard to hear, as toil, privation, injury, injustice, etc.

Meaning of Ichthyosis

Ichthyosis means: A disease in which the skin is thick, rough, and scaly; -- called also fishskin.

Meaning of Sprinkle

Sprinkle means: A small quantity scattered, or sparsely distributed; a sprinkling.

Meaning of Tellurian

Tellurian means: A dweller on the earth.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of TAFFIA

TAFFIA means: Taffia is British slang for a group of Welshmen.

Meaning of rightsize

rightsize means: To fire people. They are rightsizing the company by 1000 jobs.

Meaning of Dog biscuit

Dog biscuit means: Cracker

Meaning of DUROS

DUROS means: marijuana

Tags: Slang Meaning of A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively.. The slang definition of A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively.? Please, add a definition of A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively. if you did not find one from a search of A joke that became inordinately popular in schools. The victim would be asked 'Wanker's cramp - do you get it?', thus placing them into a Catch-22 situation. An, answer of 'no' implied that they do not understand the joke and are thus mentally deficient whilst an answer of 'yes' implies they do indeed get Wanker's Cramp, and thus masturbate excessively..

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