Slang meaning of syphilis

syphilis means: A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus.

What is the slang meaning/definition of syphilis ?

syphilis means: A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus.

Slang definition of syphilis

syphilis means: A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus.

More meanings / definitions of A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus. or words, sentences containing A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus.?

Syphilis (n.): The pox, or venereal disease; a chronic, specific, infectious disease, usually communicated by sexual intercourse or by hereditary transmission, and occurring in three stages known as primary, secondary, and tertiary syphilis. See under Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary.

Secondary (a.): Dependent or consequent upon another disease; as, Bright's disease is often secondary to scarlet fever. (b) Occuring in the second stage of a disease; as, the secondary symptoms of syphilis.

Chancre (n.): A venereal sore or ulcer; specifically, the initial lesion of true syphilis, whether forming a distinct ulcer or not; -- called also hard chancre, indurated chancre, and Hunterian chancre.

Pip (n.): A contagious disease of fowls, characterized by hoarseness, discharge from the nostrils and eyes, and an accumulation of mucus in the mouth, forming a "scale" on the tongue. By some the term pip is restricted to this last symptom, the disease being called roup by them.

Chancroid (n.): A venereal sore, resembling a chancre in its seat and some external characters, but differing from it in being the starting point of a purely local process and never of a systemic disease; -- called also soft chancre.

Symptom (n.): Any affection which accompanies disease; a perceptible change in the body or its functions, which indicates disease, or the kind or phases of disease; as, the causes of disease often lie beyond our sight, but we learn their nature by the symptoms exhibited.

Entheic (a.): Caused by a morbifie virus implanted in the system; as, an enthetic disease like syphilis.

Signature (v. t.): A resemblance between the external characters of a disease and those of some physical agent, for instance, that existing between the red skin of scarlet fever and a red cloth; -- supposed to indicate this agent in the treatment of the disease.

Syphilitic (a.): Of or pertaining to syphilis; of the nature of syphilis; affected with syphilis.

Pemphigus (n.): A somewhat rare skin disease, characterized by the development of blebs upon different part of the body.

Tetanus (n.): A painful and usually fatal disease, resulting generally from a wound, and having as its principal symptom persistent spasm of the voluntary muscles. When the muscles of the lower jaw are affected, it is called locked-jaw, or lickjaw, and it takes various names from the various incurvations of the body resulting from the spasm.

Gonorrhoea (n.): A contagious inflammatory disease of the genitourinary tract, affecting especially the urethra and vagina, and characterized by a mucopurulent discharge, pain in urination, and chordee; clap.

Anthrax (n.): An infectious disease of cattle and sheep. It is ascribed to the presence of a rod-shaped bacterium (Bacillus anthracis), the spores of which constitute the contagious matter. It may be transmitted to man by inoculation. The spleen becomes greatly enlarged and filled with bacteria. Called also splenic fever.

Glanders (n.): A highly contagious and very destructive disease of horses, asses, mules, etc., characterized by a constant discharge of sticky matter from the nose, and an enlargement and induration of the glands beneath and within the lower jaw. It may transmitted to dogs, goats, sheep, and to human beings.

Magnetotherapy (n.): The treatment of disease by the application of magnets to the surface of the body.

Cyanopathy (n.): A disease in which the body is colored blue in its surface, arising usually from a malformation of the heart, which causes an imperfect arterialization of the blood; blue jaundice.

Metallotherapy (n.): Treatment of disease by applying metallic plates to the surface of the body.

Pestilence (n.): Specifically, the disease known as the plague; hence, any contagious or infectious epidemic disease that is virulent and devastating.

Contagious (a.): Communicable by contact, by a virus, or by a bodily exhalation; catching; as, a contagious disease.

Lymph (n.): An alkaline colorless fluid, contained in the lymphatic vessels, coagulable like blood, but free from red blood corpuscles. It is absorbed from the various tissues and organs of the body, and is finally discharged by the thoracic and right lymphatic ducts into the great veins near the heart.

Infection (n.): That which infects, or causes the communicated disease; any effluvium, miasm, or pestilential matter by which an infectious disease is caused.

Paraplegy (n.): Palsy of the lower half of the body on both sides, caused usually by disease of the spinal cord.

Phlebotomy (n.): The act or practice of opening a vein for letting blood, in the treatment of disease; venesection; bloodletting.

Typhus (n.): A contagious continued fever lasting from two to three weeks, attended with great prostration and cerebral disorder, and marked by a copious eruption of red spots upon the body. Also called jail fever, famine fever, putrid fever, spottled fever, etc. See Jail fever, under Jail.

Meniere's disease (): A disease characterized by deafness and vertigo, resulting in incoordination of movement. It is supposed to depend upon a morbid condition of the semicircular canals of the internal ear. Named after Meniere, a French physician.

Basedow's disease (): A disease characterized by enlargement of the thyroid gland, prominence of the eyeballs, and inordinate action of the heart; -- called also exophthalmic goiter.

Dysentery (n.): A disease attended with inflammation and ulceration of the colon and rectum, and characterized by griping pains, constant desire to evacuate the bowels, and the discharge of mucus and blood.

Contagion (n.): That which serves as a medium or agency to transmit disease; a virus produced by, or exhalation proceeding from, a diseased person, and capable of reproducing the disease.

Vitiligo (n.): A rare skin disease consisting in the development of smooth, milk-white spots upon various parts of the body.

Gland (n.): An organ for secreting something to be used in, or eliminated from, the body; as, the sebaceous glands of the skin; the salivary glands of the mouth.

Like to add another meaning or definition of A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus.

Meaning of syphilis

syphilis means: A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus.

Meaning of gonorrhea

gonorrhea means: [gahn-uh-ree'-uh] a specific infection caused by the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, commonly called gonococcus. It is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases. The bacterium can primarily infect only certain parts of the body: the urethra, uterine cervix, rectum, throat, and eyes. The vast majority of cases are acquired by sexual contact. Initial symptoms of gonorrhea appear about 2 to 10 days after infection, although 10 percent of men and as many as 80 percent of women show no symptoms at all. The urethra is the site most infected in men and symptoms include burning urination and a penile discharge. In women, gonorrhea most often attacks the reproductive tract but can also infect the urethra, rectum, throat, and eyes. Symptoms may include burning urination and a vaginal discharge. Infections in the throat or rectum almost never produce symptoms, and infection of the eyes results in pain, redness, and discharge. If the infection is untreated in women, it can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, and subsequently some of these women have difficulty becoming pregnant. The disease may result in infection of the joints (arthritis). During birth, babies may contract gonococcal eye disease from an infected mother. Silver nitrate drops placed into the eyes of newborns kill the gonococcus if present. Antibiotics given to both partners have traditionally been the preferred treatment for gonorrhea. However, recent studies have found that penicillin- and tetracycline-resistant gonorrhea increased alarmingly from 1988 to 1989. Treatment is moving toward the use of more expensive drugs, such as ceftriaxone, to treat the disease. New drugs and a possible vaccine are being developed to combat the disease.

Meaning of sexually-transmitted disease

sexually-transmitted disease means: Any disease such as syphilis, gonorrhea, or AIDS, transmitted primarily by intimate sexual contact, particularly through sexual penetration.

Meaning of penis souvenir

penis souvenir means: A sexually-transmitted disease such as syphilis or AIDS.

Meaning of CD4 count

CD4 count means: The Centers for Disease Control and local health departments consider you to have AIDS if your CD4 count has EVER been below 200.viral load testing, the CD4 count as the principal marker for guiding individual HIV treatment decisions and for evaluating the effectiveness of anti-HIV drugs in clinical studies. With accurate measurements of the amount of HIV in their blood plasma as measured by HIV viral load testing, physicians and patients can make more informed decisions about when to start anti-HIV therapy, when to stop using an ineffective treatment and when to add or switch to a new treatment.

Meaning of HIV

HIV means: Human Immunodeficiency virus. 1959 is earliest documented evidence of infection of the HIV virus was found in an blood sample taken in Zaire. First described by the Centers for Disease Control, [CDC] IN 1981.

Meaning of bend a pipe on the pisser

bend a pipe on the pisser means: Venereal disease, a sexually-transmitted disease; to have a stinging sensation in the penis when urinating.

Meaning of Black Syph

Black Syph means: The most loathsome venereal disease known to any sailor, where, as legend has it, will cause a man's penis to turn black and fall off. Usually, any venereal disease, whether it be syphilis or not, is often referred to as the "Black Syph".

Meaning of Bill of Health

Bill of Health means: A certificate authenticated by a recognized port authority, certifying that a ship comes from a place where there is no contagious disease, and that none of her crew was infected with such a disease.

Meaning of Pubic Lice

Pubic Lice means: (Pediculosis)also called "crabs" or "cooties.". Pubic lice look like tiny crabs; thus the name crabs. They are pale gray but darken in color when swollen with blood. They attach themselves and their eggs to pubic hair, underarm hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes. Their eggs are white and are deposited in small clumps near the hair roots. Common symptoms * intense itching in the genitals or anus * irritability. * mild fever * feeling run down Pubic Lice Are Spread * intimate and sexual contact. * contact with infected bedding, clothing, upholstered furniture and toilet seats Treatment over-the-counter medication. Some of the brands available are A-200(R),Kwell(R),NIX(R) and RID(R). Follow the directions on the package insert. Repeated head-to-toe applications may be necessary. Everyone who may have been exposed to pubic lice should be treated at the same time. All bedding, towels, and clothing that may have been exposed should be thoroughly washed or dry cleaned. The home should be thoroughly vacuumed.

Meaning of clap

clap means: Gonorrhea (gon-or-e-uh) is a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) caused by a type of bacteria (germ) Gonorrhea is passed from one person to another during vaginal, anal, and oral sex. PID (pelvic inflammatory disease).

Meaning of Cupid's itch

Cupid's itch means: Venereal disease a sexually transmitted disease.

Meaning of Toning

Toning means: An extremely stupid term, mainly used by misinformed women to describe a look they want to achieve in a certain area of the body. This look is usually achieved when you drop body fat and gain muscle mass resulting in a “toned” appearance. The use of this word can be a good litmus test to see which trainers are for real, and which ones are the “trendy trainers”

Meaning of poxy

poxy means: Originally someone who had one of the various pox's, e.g. chicken pox, cow pox, small pox etc. These produce pustules on the skin which can often result in 'pock marks, hence pocky, pocksy or poxy. From that, anyone who has some sort of skin problem would be called 'poxy'... and from that anyone thought to be crap or minging would get the nick as well! The contributor was musing on why the name has persisted for so long since smallpox has been eradicated for so long, but I think he's forgetting that 'the pox' was also a euphemism for any kind of venereal disease, or sexually transmitted infection. So, for as long as *they* persist, being called 'poxy' will be an insult!

Meaning of Quarantine

Quarantine means: A harbor restriction placed on a ship which has an infectious disease on board, or which has arrived from a country where such a disease is prevalent. The crew may not go ashore until the ship is granted pratique.

Meaning of olfactophilia

olfactophilia means: A person with this fetish is sexually aroused by body smells. Actions usually involve inserting a finger in an asshole, vagina, or other body site where strong scents are likely to be found, and smelling it during sex.

Meaning of bugs

bugs means: Mysterious disease or ailment transmitted to you by getting to close to someone who was dirty or smelly, and that you could in turn transmit to other people by touching them. e.g. if you got too close to someone who was dirty you then had 'the bugs'. People who were particularly dirty were called either 'bugsy boy' or 'bugsy girl'. Note. You could protect yourself from the bugs by clutching the top of your arm (I'd imagine this came from holding the area where you had your inoculation jab) and shouting, '1,2,3,4,5 bugs injection all over for life'. This was a primary school practise and died out by the time you got to secondary school.

Meaning of Scurvy

Scurvy means: A disease characterized by general debility of the body, extreme tenderness of the gums, foul breath, subcutaneous eruptions and pains in the limbs, induced by exposure and by a too liberal diet of salted foods; Scorbutus. Now recognized as due to insufficient ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in the diet.

Meaning of Northridge Dental Implant Center

Northridge Dental Implant Center means: Business Name: Northridge Dental Implant Center

Address: 8954 Reseda Boulevard Suite 100-2, Northridge, CA 91324 USA

Phone: (818) 925-9181

Website: https://www.northridgedentalimplant.com

Description: Northridge Dental Implant Center is the premier dental implant destination in the Northridge area. Our board-certified dental implant periodontists and dentists are specialists in all phases of implant dentistry. Dental implants are what we love to do and what we primarily focus on. Due to the volume of dental implant cases we treat, we are able to offer you're the best in class treatment in the heart of Northridge. At Northridge Dental Implant Center, we understand the importance of providing high-quality dental treatment and a level of skill that is unmatched. The health of your teeth, the appearance of your smile, and your personal wellbeing are our top priorities. We enjoy a reputation for clinical excellence, unsurpassed service, and meeting patients' needs. Our satisfaction comes from making quality implants, and seeing patients enjoy their renewed aesthetics, function, and enhanced wellbeing. Whether you require a simple procedure or a complex reconstruction, we strive to make your visits as comfortable and pleasant as possible. We're committed to giving you another second chance to have teeth that look and feel great and help energize your life. We take pride in the level of care we bring our patients. Our diagnosis is thorough, and our treatment takes the most effective and convenient approach. We're experts at helping patients just like you recover from the ravages of dental diseases and tooth loss. We emphasize excellent communication, patient education, and encourage your active participation in making critical decisions. We know that each patient is different, that is the reason we work closely with every patient to provide restoration solutions that fit their needs and lifestyles. If you're looking for sturdy, discreet, and lasting replacement teeth, we at Northridge Dental Implant Center can help. Please don't hesitate to reach us today at 818-925-9181 to understand our dental implant procedures or to book an appointment.

Keywords: Dentist at Northridge, CA

Hour: 24/7

Meaning of SATCHEL−MOUTH

SATCHEL−MOUTH means: Satchel−mouth was early th century Black American slang for a person with a large mouth.

Meaning of Syphilis

Syphilis means: The pox, or venereal disease; a chronic, specific, infectious disease, usually communicated by sexual intercourse or by hereditary transmission, and occurring in three stages known as primary, secondary, and tertiary syphilis. See under Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary.

Meaning of Secondary

Secondary means: Dependent or consequent upon another disease; as, Bright's disease is often secondary to scarlet fever. (b) Occuring in the second stage of a disease; as, the secondary symptoms of syphilis.

Meaning of Chancre

Chancre means: A venereal sore or ulcer; specifically, the initial lesion of true syphilis, whether forming a distinct ulcer or not; -- called also hard chancre, indurated chancre, and Hunterian chancre.

Meaning of Pip

Pip means: A contagious disease of fowls, characterized by hoarseness, discharge from the nostrils and eyes, and an accumulation of mucus in the mouth, forming a "scale" on the tongue. By some the term pip is restricted to this last symptom, the disease being called roup by them.

Meaning of Chancroid

Chancroid means: A venereal sore, resembling a chancre in its seat and some external characters, but differing from it in being the starting point of a purely local process and never of a systemic disease; -- called also soft chancre.

Meaning of Symptom

Symptom means: Any affection which accompanies disease; a perceptible change in the body or its functions, which indicates disease, or the kind or phases of disease; as, the causes of disease often lie beyond our sight, but we learn their nature by the symptoms exhibited.

Meaning of Entheic

Entheic means: Caused by a morbifie virus implanted in the system; as, an enthetic disease like syphilis.

Meaning of Signature

Signature means: A resemblance between the external characters of a disease and those of some physical agent, for instance, that existing between the red skin of scarlet fever and a red cloth; -- supposed to indicate this agent in the treatment of the disease.

Meaning of Syphilitic

Syphilitic means: Of or pertaining to syphilis; of the nature of syphilis; affected with syphilis.

Meaning of Pemphigus

Pemphigus means: A somewhat rare skin disease, characterized by the development of blebs upon different part of the body.

Meaning of Tetanus

Tetanus means: A painful and usually fatal disease, resulting generally from a wound, and having as its principal symptom persistent spasm of the voluntary muscles. When the muscles of the lower jaw are affected, it is called locked-jaw, or lickjaw, and it takes various names from the various incurvations of the body resulting from the spasm.

Meaning of Gonorrhoea

Gonorrhoea means: A contagious inflammatory disease of the genitourinary tract, affecting especially the urethra and vagina, and characterized by a mucopurulent discharge, pain in urination, and chordee; clap.

Meaning of Anthrax

Anthrax means: An infectious disease of cattle and sheep. It is ascribed to the presence of a rod-shaped bacterium (Bacillus anthracis), the spores of which constitute the contagious matter. It may be transmitted to man by inoculation. The spleen becomes greatly enlarged and filled with bacteria. Called also splenic fever.

Meaning of Glanders

Glanders means: A highly contagious and very destructive disease of horses, asses, mules, etc., characterized by a constant discharge of sticky matter from the nose, and an enlargement and induration of the glands beneath and within the lower jaw. It may transmitted to dogs, goats, sheep, and to human beings.

Meaning of Magnetotherapy

Magnetotherapy means: The treatment of disease by the application of magnets to the surface of the body.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Dryth

Dryth means: Alt. of Drith

Meaning of Incurring

Incurring means: of Incur

Meaning of Istle

Istle means: Same as Ixtle.

Meaning of Pineweed

Pineweed means: A low, bushy, nearly leafless herb (Hypericum Sarothra), common in sandy soil in the Eastern United States.

Meaning of Simulacra

Simulacra means: of Simulacrum

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of GRAHAM GOOCH

GRAHAM GOOCH means: Graham Gooch was London Cockney rhyming slang for the alco−pop drink 'Hooch'.

Meaning of BWTM

BWTM means: But Wait, There's More

Meaning of meh

meh means: Who cares, whatever

Meaning of nook

nook means: A problem. You're facing a tough nook; how are you going to solve it?

Meaning of RED DEVILS

RED DEVILS means: seconal

Tags: Slang Meaning of A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus.. The slang definition of A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus.? Please, add a definition of A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus. if you did not find one from a search of A sexually-transmitted disease. Caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. The spirochete cannot survive outside the body, so contracting the disease by other than intimate sexual contact is rare. The spirochete usually enters the body through invisible breaks in the skin or through intact mucous membranes lining the mouth, rectum, or genital tract. About three weeks later the person develops a sore, called a chancre, at the entry spot. Relatively painless, it is usually found around the genitalia but is sometimes seen on the lips or mouth, on the breasts, or around the rectum. Lymph nodes in the affected area often become enlarged. The chancre contains large numbers of spirochetes and is highly contagious. Even without treatment the chancre slowly heals in several weeks; the spirochetes, however, spread throughout the body, and six weeks to six months later the secondary stage of syphilis occurs, characterized mainly by fever, swollen glands, and a painless, non-itching rash over most of the body, including the genital tract, the mouth, and the palms and soles. Lesions also form in the mouth and around the vagina and anus, and these are highly contagious. Symptoms eventually resolve, and the disease enters its latent phase. Two-thirds of syphilis patients have no further trouble with the disease and are no longer infectious. In some persons, involvement of the brain and spinal cord will occur from several months to years later, causing difficulties with thinking, sensation, and movement. Patients may suffer skin and bone damage or damage to the blood vessels around the heart, resulting in heart failure and sometimes requiring surgery. Some pregnant women transmit the organism to the fetus, resulting in miscarriage, stillbirth, or deformities that may be obvious at birth or may not appear until the child reaches puberty. Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test, and all stages of the disease can be cured with the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Damage that has already been done to affected tissues, however, cannot necessarily be repaired; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore extremely important. Patients who have been treated need to take blood tests periodically for two years thereafter. People with syphilis and other STDs have been found to be more susceptible to infection with the HIV virus..

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