Slang meaning of FILLET OF VEAL

FILLET OF VEAL means: Fillet of veal is London Cockney rhyming slang for prison (steel).

What is the slang meaning/definition of FILLET OF VEAL ?

FILLET OF VEAL means: Fillet of veal is London Cockney rhyming slang for prison (steel).

Slang definition of FILLET OF VEAL

FILLET OF VEAL means: Fillet of veal is London Cockney rhyming slang for prison (steel).

More meanings / definitions of / dictionary similarities to Fillet of veal is London Cockney rhyming slang for prison (steel). or words, sentences containing Fillet of veal is London Cockney rhyming slang for prison (steel).?

Cockney (n.): A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Little-ease (n.): An old slang name for the pillory, stocks, etc., of a prison.

Vying (): a. & n. from Vie. W () the twenty-third letter of the English alphabet, is usually a consonant, but sometimes it is a vowel, forming the second element of certain diphthongs, as in few, how. It takes its written form and its name from the repetition of a V, this being the original form of the Roman capital letter which we call U. Etymologically it is most related to v and u. See V, and U. Some of the uneducated classes in England, especially in London, confuse w and v, substituting the one for the other, as weal for veal, and veal for weal; wine for vine, and vine for wine, etc. See Guide to Pronunciation, // 266-268.

Counter (v. t.): A prison; either of two prisons formerly in London.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Fricando (n.): A ragout or fricassee of veal; a fancy dish of veal or of boned turkey, served as an entree, -- called also fricandel.

Fleet (v. i.): A former prison in London, which originally stood near a stream, the Fleet (now filled up).

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Bailey (n.): A prison or court of justice; -- used in certain proper names; as, the Old Bailey in London; the New Bailey in Manchester.

Steel (n.): To overlay, point, or edge with steel; as, to steel a razor; to steel an ax.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Fillet (v. t.): To bind, furnish, or adorn with a fillet.

Prison (v. t.): To imprison; to shut up in, or as in, a prison; to confine; to restrain from liberty.

Bocardo (n.): A prison; -- originally the name of the old north gate in Oxford, which was used as a prison.

Quod (n.): A quadrangle or court, as of a prison; hence, a prison.

Flat-cap (n.): A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

Mittimus (n.): A precept or warrant granted by a justice for committing to prison a party charged with crime; a warrant of commitment to prison.

Bastile Bastille (n.): "The Bastille", formerly a castle or fortress in Paris, used as a prison, especially for political offenders; hence, a rhetorical name for a prison.

Siderography (n.): The art or practice of steel engraving; especially, the process, invented by Perkins, of multiplying facsimiles of an engraved steel plate by first rolling over it, when hardened, a soft steel cylinder, and then rolling the cylinder, when hardened, over a soft steel plate, which thus becomes a facsimile of the original. The process has been superseded by electrotypy.

Rhyming (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Rhyme

Triplet (n.): Three verses rhyming together.

Cokenay (n.): A cockney.

Cockneys (pl. ): of Cockney

Steeling (n.): The process of pointing, edging, or overlaying with steel; specifically, acierage. See Steel, v.

Steely (a.): Resembling steel; hard; firm; having the color of steel.

Cockney (a.): Of or relating to, or like, cockneys.

Chalybeous (a.): Steel blue; of the color of tempered steel.

Steel (n.): An instrument of steel (usually a round rod) for sharpening knives.

Steel (n.): A piece of steel for striking sparks from flint.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Fillet of veal is London Cockney rhyming slang for prison (steel).?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Fillet of veal is London Cockney rhyming slang for prison (steel).

Meaning of FILLET OF VEAL

FILLET OF VEAL means: Fillet of veal is London Cockney rhyming slang for prison (steel).

Meaning of FILLET OF PLAICE

FILLET OF PLAICE means: Fillet of plaice is London Cockney rhyming slang for the face.

Meaning of FILLET OF COD

FILLET OF COD means: Fillet of cod is British rhyming slang for an offensive person (sod).

Meaning of IN AND OUT

IN AND OUT means: In and out is British slang for sexual intercourse.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for snout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for spout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for sprout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for stout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for tout.

Meaning of Fillet

Fillet means: That chick is so Fillet (bad to the bone, bad to the T-Bone, bad to the Fillet Mignon.....shortened to just "Fillet")

Meaning of THE STEEL

THE STEEL means: The steel was th century British slang for prison.

Meaning of HARRY LAUDER

HARRY LAUDER means: Harry Lauder is theatre rhyming slang for border.Harry Lauder is British military slang for soldiers of the Border Regiment.Harry Lauder is London Cockney rhyming slang for orderHarry Lauder is London Cockney rhyming slang for a prison warder.

Meaning of BUBBLE AND SQUEAK

BUBBLE AND SQUEAK means: Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for beak (a magistrate). Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Greek.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for speak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for weak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a week.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for to urinate (leak).

Meaning of SHOVEL AND PICK

SHOVEL AND PICK means: Shovel and pick is London Cockney rhyming slang for an Irish person (Mick). Shovel and pick is London Cockney rhyming slang for prison (nick).

Meaning of KANGAROO

KANGAROO means: Kangaro is London Cockney rhyming slang for a jew.Kangaroo is British and Australian rhyming slang for a prison warder (screw).

Meaning of JACK AND JILL

JACK AND JILL means: Jack and Jill is British slang for a male and female police officer working as a partnership. Jack andJill is London Cockney rhyming slang for hill.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for bill.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for till.Jack and Jill is London Cockney rhyming slang for pill.

Meaning of HARRY TATE

HARRY TATE means: Harry Tate is bingo slang for eight.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for late.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for plate.Harry Tate is London Cockney rhyming slang for a state of agitation or nervousness (state). HarryTate is London Cockney rhyming slang for weight.Harry Tate is British merchant navy slang for mate.

Meaning of DUKE OF YORK

DUKE OF YORK means: Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for chalk. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for cork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for fork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for pork. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for talk. Duke of York is London Cockney rhyming slang for walk.

Meaning of JAM ROLL

JAM ROLL means: Jam roll is London Cockney rhyming slang for unemployment (dole). Jam roll is British prison rhyming slang for parole.

Meaning of DAILY MAIL

DAILY MAIL means: Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for tale. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for ale. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for bail. Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for nail.Daily Mail is London Cockney rhyming slang for the backside, buttocks (tail). Daily Mail is British slang for the sex.

Meaning of LITTLE BOY BLUE

LITTLE BOY BLUE means: Little Boy Blue is London Cockney rhyming slang for a prison warder (screw).

Meaning of JOE GURR

JOE GURR means: Joe Gurr is London Cockney rhyming slang for prison (stir).

Meaning of COW'S LICK

COW'S LICK means: Cow's lick is London Cockney rhyming slang for prison (nick).

Meaning of CARPET BAG

CARPET BAG means: Carpet bag is London Cockney rhyming slang for three−month prison sentence (drag).

Meaning of COW'S CALF

COW'S CALF means: Cow's calf is London Cockney rhyming slang for half, especially pence or a six−month prison sentence.

Meaning of Cockney

Cockney means: A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Meaning of Little-ease

Little-ease means: An old slang name for the pillory, stocks, etc., of a prison.

Meaning of Vying

Vying means: a. & n. from Vie. W () the twenty-third letter of the English alphabet, is usually a consonant, but sometimes it is a vowel, forming the second element of certain diphthongs, as in few, how. It takes its written form and its name from the repetition of a V, this being the original form of the Roman capital letter which we call U. Etymologically it is most related to v and u. See V, and U. Some of the uneducated classes in England, especially in London, confuse w and v, substituting the one for the other, as weal for veal, and veal for weal; wine for vine, and vine for wine, etc. See Guide to Pronunciation, // 266-268.

Meaning of Counter

Counter means: A prison; either of two prisons formerly in London.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Fricando

Fricando means: A ragout or fricassee of veal; a fancy dish of veal or of boned turkey, served as an entree, -- called also fricandel.

Meaning of Fleet

Fleet means: A former prison in London, which originally stood near a stream, the Fleet (now filled up).

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Meaning of Bailey

Bailey means: A prison or court of justice; -- used in certain proper names; as, the Old Bailey in London; the New Bailey in Manchester.

Meaning of Steel

Steel means: To overlay, point, or edge with steel; as, to steel a razor; to steel an ax.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Meaning of Fillet

Fillet means: To bind, furnish, or adorn with a fillet.

Meaning of Prison

Prison means: To imprison; to shut up in, or as in, a prison; to confine; to restrain from liberty.

Meaning of Bocardo

Bocardo means: A prison; -- originally the name of the old north gate in Oxford, which was used as a prison.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Differential

Differential means: An increment, usually an indefinitely small one, which is given to a variable quantity.

Meaning of Hyalophane

Hyalophane means: A species of the feldspar group containing barium. See Feldspar.

Meaning of Sagging

Sagging means: A bending or sinking between the ends of a thing, in consequence of its own, or an imposed, weight; an arching downward in the middle, as of a ship after straining. Cf. Hogging.

Meaning of Silly

Silly means: Weak in intellect; destitute of ordinary strength of mind; foolish; witless; simple; as, a silly woman.

Meaning of Similitude

Similitude means: That which is like or similar; a representation, semblance, or copy; a facsimile.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of CHOKE A DARKIE

CHOKE A DARKIE means: Choke a darkie is Australian slang for to defecate.

Meaning of OUTJIE

OUTJIE means: Outjie is South African slang for a child, a small person.

Meaning of Elliot Ness

Elliot Ness means: Mess. My drum's a right Elliot

Meaning of stool pigeon

stool pigeon means: A squealer, tattletale. Three guys at the party were stoned.

Meaning of gen net/net gen

gen net/net gen means: ten shillings (1/-), backslang from the 1800s (from 'ten gen').

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