Slang meaning of OLD SCHOOL/ OLD SCHOOLER

OLD SCHOOL/ OLD SCHOOLER means:  a way of saying Back in the days in the streets, school of hard knocks. A person who was representing the streets back in the days. Early days of the streets.

What is the slang meaning/definition of OLD SCHOOL/ OLD SCHOOLER ?

OLD SCHOOL/ OLD SCHOOLER means:  a way of saying Back in the days in the streets, school of hard knocks. A person who was representing the streets back in the days. Early days of the streets.

Slang definition of OLD SCHOOL/ OLD SCHOOLER

OLD SCHOOL/ OLD SCHOOLER means:  a way of saying Back in the days in the streets, school of hard knocks. A person who was representing the streets back in the days. Early days of the streets.

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More meanings / definitions of  a way of saying Back in the days in the streets, school of hard knocks. A person who was representing the streets back in the days. Early days of the streets. or words, sentences containing  a way of saying Back in the days in the streets, school of hard knocks. A person who was representing the streets back in the days. Early days of the streets.?

Dog days (): A period of from four to six weeks, in the summer, variously placed by almanac makers between the early part of July and the early part of September; canicular days; -- so called in reference to the rising in ancient times of the Dog Star (Sirius) with the sun. Popularly, the sultry, close part of the summer.

Year (n.): The time of the apparent revolution of the sun trough the ecliptic; the period occupied by the earth in making its revolution around the sun, called the astronomical year; also, a period more or less nearly agreeing with this, adopted by various nations as a measure of time, and called the civil year; as, the common lunar year of 354 days, still in use among the Mohammedans; the year of 360 days, etc. In common usage, the year consists of 365 days, and every fourth year (called bissextile, or leap year) of 366 days, a day being added to February on that year, on account of the excess above 365 days (see Bissextile).

Black-letter (a.): Of or pertaining to the days in the calendar not marked with red letters as saints' days. Hence: Unlucky; inauspicious.

Hebdomadary (a.): Consisting of seven days, or occurring at intervals of seven days; weekly.

Cross-days (n. pl.): The three days preceding the Feast of the Ascension.

Tenebrae (n.): The matins and lauds for the last three days of Holy Week, commemorating the sufferings and death of Christ, -- usually sung on the afternoon or evening of Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, instead of on the following days.

Sigillaria (n. pl.): Little images or figures of earthenware exposed for sale, or given as presents, on the last two days of the Saturnalia; hence, the last two, or the sixth and seventh, days of the Saturnalia.

Quadragene (n.): An indulgence of forty days, corresponding to the forty days of ancient canonical penance.

Recall (v. t.): To call back to mind; to revive in memory; to recollect; to remember; as, to recall bygone days.

February (n.): The second month in the year, said to have been introduced into the Roman calendar by Numa. In common years this month contains twenty-eight days; in the bissextile, or leap year, it has twenty-nine days.

Scavenger (v.): A person whose employment is to clean the streets of a city, by scraping or sweeping, and carrying off the filth. The name is also applied to any animal which devours refuse, carrion, or anything injurious to health.

Leap year (): Bissextile; a year containing 366 days; every fourth year which leaps over a day more than a common year, giving to February twenty-nine days. See Bissextile.

Scavenge (v. t.): To cleanse, as streets, from filth.

Paviage (n.): A contribution or a tax for paving streets or highways.

Streetward (n.): An officer, or ward, having the care of the streets.

Stradometrical (a.): Of, or relating to, the measuring of streets or roads.

Obitual (a.): Of or pertaining to obits, or days when obits are celebrated; as, obitual days.

Watchman (n.): Specifically, one who guards a building, or the streets of a city, by night.

Bookstand (n.): A place or stand for the sale of books in the streets; a bookstall.

Douar (n.): A village composed of Arab tents arranged in streets.

Ragpicker (n.): One who gets a living by picking up rags and refuse things in the streets.

Streetwalker (n.): A common prostitute who walks the streets to find customers.

Block (v. t.): A square, or portion of a city inclosed by streets, whether occupied by buildings or not.

Time (n.): The duration of one's life; the hours and days which a person has at his disposal.

Bellman (n.): A man who rings a bell, especially to give notice of anything in the streets. Formerly, also, a night watchman who called the hours.

Youthful (a.): Of or pertaining to the early part of life; suitable to early life; as, youthful days; youthful sports.

Tramway (n.): A railway laid in the streets of a town or city, on which cars for passengers or for freight are drawn by horses; a horse railroad.

Mohawk (n.): One of certain ruffians who infested the streets of London in the time of Addison, and took the name from the Mohawk Indians.

Working-day (a.): Pertaining to, or characteristic of, working days, or workdays; everyday; hence, plodding; hard-working.

Bunter (n.): A woman who picks up rags in the streets; hence, a low, vulgar woman.

Like to add another meaning or definition of  a way of saying Back in the days in the streets, school of hard knocks. A person who was representing the streets back in the days. Early days of the streets.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to  a way of saying Back in the days in the streets, school of hard knocks. A person who was representing the streets back in the days. Early days of the streets.

Meaning of OLD SCHOOL/ OLD SCHOOLER

OLD SCHOOL/ OLD SCHOOLER means:  a way of saying Back in the days in the streets, school of hard knocks. A person who was representing the streets back in the days. Early days of the streets.

Meaning of OLD SCHOOL/ OLD SCHOOLER

OLD SCHOOL/ OLD SCHOOLER means:  a way of saying Back in the days in the streets, school of hard knocks. A person who was representing the streets back in the days. Early days of the streets.

Meaning of Man for Breakfast -

Man for Breakfast - means: A murdered body in the streets at dawn. Commonplace in the early days of

Meaning of bag person (... man, ... woman)

bag person (... man, ... woman) means: Person who wanders around city streets rummaging in rubbish bins and the like. Can often be seen picking up half eaten ice-creams etc and eating them. Occasionally these people collect waste for re-sale, e.g. tin cans and the like. The name "bag-person" derives from them usually carrying their entire worldy posessions in two or more Tesco shopping bags (tho' often as not these days pushing a supermarket trolley with the bags etc inside).

Meaning of (it's) early days

(it's) early days means: Phrs. Too soon to know whether a situation is correct or how things will turn out. E.g."It's early days. We can't possibly know if the war in Iraq will change the country for the better." [Informal]

Meaning of GRITTY

GRITTY means: When a drug dealer is on the streets selling drugs, he's on the grind or grinding. A person who is constantly hittin the streets to find ways to make money to survive in the hood legally or illegally.

Meaning of GRITTY

GRITTY means: When a drug dealer is on the streets selling drugs, he's on the grind or grinding. A person who is constantly hittin the streets to find ways to make money to survive in the hood legally or illegally.

Meaning of Days and a Wake-up

Days and a Wake-up means: When a sailor is counting down the days to an event he might use this counting down term. Example: If a sailor was posted off the ship five days, he might refer to it as "four days and a wake-up."

Meaning of Back In The Day

Back In The Day means: expression. back in the days of..., '90s version of "When I was..." or "Remember when...?"

Meaning of Knock up

Knock up means: This means to wake someone up. Although it seems to have an altogether different meaning in the USA! At one time, in England, a chap was employed to go round the streets to wake the workers up in time to get to work. He knew where everyone lived and tapped on the bedroom windows with a long stick, and was known as a "knocker up". He also turned off the gas street lights on his rounds. Another meaning of this phrase, that is more common these days, is to make something out of odds and ends. For example my Dad knocked up a tree house for us from some planks of wood he had in the garage, or you might knock up a meal from whatever you have hanging around in the fridge.

Meaning of Knock up

Knock up means: This means to wake someone up. Although it seems to have an altogether different meaning in the USA! At one time, in England, a chap was employed to go round the streets to wake the workers up in time to get to work. He knew where everyone lived and tapped on the bedroom windows with a long stick, and was known as a "knocker up". He also turned off the gas street lights on his rounds. Another meaning of this phrase, that is more common these days, is to make something out of odds and ends. For example my Dad knocked up a tree house for us from some planks of wood he had in the garage, or you might knock up a meal from whatever you have hanging around in the fridge.

Meaning of DOWN BY LAW

DOWN BY LAW means: An old school term for a person who is certified, or who has great credentials, great repoir in the streets.

Meaning of DOWN BY LAW

DOWN BY LAW means: An old school term for a person who is certified, or who has great credentials, great repoir in the streets.

Meaning of Money Honey

Money Honey means: nickname for CNBC’s Maria Bartiromo back in the days when the markets were hot and so was she.

Meaning of Money Honey

Money Honey means: nickname for CNBC’s Maria Bartiromo back in the days when the markets were hot and so was she.

Meaning of Mottisa

Mottisa means: Back in slave days the Black servants would ask "Mo tee Sah", which in proper English translates to "More tea Sir?"

Meaning of 'All days'

'All days' means: 24 inch rims for a car.  "Did you see Jr. on them new 'all-days' he got?" 

Meaning of hait, hate

hait, hate means: Love, be attracted to. Reversed term. Used as "I hait you and you hait me so why dont we go out together?" Term mainly used by teenagers now-a-days to confuse each other and adults. . Hait is a contextual word for The contributor says he usually uses it as a relpacement for 'love' when around parents so they dont know what's being talked about. Hait is pronounced just like hate. But with different meanings. Contributor really likes this word because they think it is really funny to see peoples expressions when you say you hait them... Isn't suggesting saying it to a girl/boy friend. The word has just recently become a popular slang term and is used frequently on the streets.

Meaning of BAKRA

BAKRA means: white slavemaster, or member of the ruling class in colonial days. Popular etymology: "back raw" (which he bestowed with a whip.)

Meaning of born-days

born-days means: a life time, ie., “All my born days I never saw anything like that”

Meaning of Dog days

Dog days means: A period of from four to six weeks, in the summer, variously placed by almanac makers between the early part of July and the early part of September; canicular days; -- so called in reference to the rising in ancient times of the Dog Star (Sirius) with the sun. Popularly, the sultry, close part of the summer.

Meaning of Year

Year means: The time of the apparent revolution of the sun trough the ecliptic; the period occupied by the earth in making its revolution around the sun, called the astronomical year; also, a period more or less nearly agreeing with this, adopted by various nations as a measure of time, and called the civil year; as, the common lunar year of 354 days, still in use among the Mohammedans; the year of 360 days, etc. In common usage, the year consists of 365 days, and every fourth year (called bissextile, or leap year) of 366 days, a day being added to February on that year, on account of the excess above 365 days (see Bissextile).

Meaning of Black-letter

Black-letter means: Of or pertaining to the days in the calendar not marked with red letters as saints' days. Hence: Unlucky; inauspicious.

Meaning of Hebdomadary

Hebdomadary means: Consisting of seven days, or occurring at intervals of seven days; weekly.

Meaning of Cross-days

Cross-days means: The three days preceding the Feast of the Ascension.

Meaning of Tenebrae

Tenebrae means: The matins and lauds for the last three days of Holy Week, commemorating the sufferings and death of Christ, -- usually sung on the afternoon or evening of Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, instead of on the following days.

Meaning of Sigillaria

Sigillaria means: Little images or figures of earthenware exposed for sale, or given as presents, on the last two days of the Saturnalia; hence, the last two, or the sixth and seventh, days of the Saturnalia.

Meaning of Quadragene

Quadragene means: An indulgence of forty days, corresponding to the forty days of ancient canonical penance.

Meaning of Recall

Recall means: To call back to mind; to revive in memory; to recollect; to remember; as, to recall bygone days.

Meaning of February

February means: The second month in the year, said to have been introduced into the Roman calendar by Numa. In common years this month contains twenty-eight days; in the bissextile, or leap year, it has twenty-nine days.

Meaning of Scavenger

Scavenger means: A person whose employment is to clean the streets of a city, by scraping or sweeping, and carrying off the filth. The name is also applied to any animal which devours refuse, carrion, or anything injurious to health.

Meaning of Leap year

Leap year means: Bissextile; a year containing 366 days; every fourth year which leaps over a day more than a common year, giving to February twenty-nine days. See Bissextile.

Meaning of Scavenge

Scavenge means: To cleanse, as streets, from filth.

Meaning of Paviage

Paviage means: A contribution or a tax for paving streets or highways.

Meaning of Streetward

Streetward means: An officer, or ward, having the care of the streets.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Adjurer

Adjurer means: One who adjures.

Meaning of Chitterling

Chitterling means: The frill to the breast of a shirt, which when ironed out resembled the small entrails. See Chitterlings.

Meaning of Halt

Halt means: To hold one's self from proceeding; to hold up; to cease progress; to stop for a longer or shorter period; to come to a stop; to stand still.

Meaning of Northerly

Northerly means: Of or pertaining to the north; toward the north, or from the north; northern.

Meaning of Quicken

Quicken means: To move with rapidity or activity; to become accelerated; as, his pulse quickened.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of KISS UP

KISS UP means: Kiss up is American slang for to behave like a sycophant.

Meaning of NOAH'S ARK

NOAH'S ARK means: Noah's ark is London Cockney rhyming slang for park. Noah's ark is London Cockney rhyming slang for nark. Noah's ark is London Cockney rhyming slang for dark. Noah's ark is London Cockney rhyming slang for lark.

Meaning of Yankee

Yankee means: slang term for americans, or baseball team for new york. like canuck for Canadians

Meaning of Dear

Dear means: - If something is dear it means it is expensive. I thought Texan insurance was dear.

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